Tag: England

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Ash Wednesday, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Paddy

 

You were made from dust…

Had I walked about, and run, this morning topless and with neon purple hair, I think I would have attracted fewer stares than I did today. Growing up in very Catholic Massachusetts, I’m not sure it had ever occurred to me on more than a purely intellectual level what it means to be a religious minority, especially one that (even for a day) was marked out in its physical difference. Which is not to say that I feel the victim; I am perfectly free, as so many martyrs and fathers in ‘priest holes’ were not, to practice my faith, and to giggle at the man who stopped walking his dog and turned around to watch me go by like a latter-day circus attraction. In fact, I left Mass this morning more uplifted than I had been in weeks, embracing something of the Chestertonian paradox that finds the deepest hope in the most profound sadness. On a day of penitence, prayer, and fasting, I found joy.

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I’ve walked in the fields, and I’ve trod light for daysSeems I’ll do that old rag, takes me all kinds of waysExcept the way I’d be headed if I knew where I was goingBut I’m from the country, and it’s better not knowing.  I do not pretend to know much about life. I have read […]

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We have experienced the truth of this prophecy, for England has become the habitation of outsiders and the dominion of foreigners. Today, no Englishman is earl, bishop, or abbot, and newcomers gnaw away at the riches and very innards of England; nor is there any hope for an end of this misery.—William of Malmesbury (c. […]

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On this day (variously given as March 20 and March 21, and making the usual allowances for the Julian Calendar discrepancy), 605 years ago, Henry of Monmouth, Prince of Wales, became King Henry V of England. And it’s a jolly good thing, too. More

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This time of year seems to inspire a closer look at our human condition. As I clean up and organize in preparation for the holidays, tax season, acknowledging another year coming to a close, I seem to reflect on my spiritual condition more closely. Inspired by recent posts by @paddysiochain, @susanquinn, @skipsul, @curtnorth, @gilreich, @midge […]

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The town of Edenbridge, England holds an annual bonfire to commemorate the failure of the 1605 Gunpowder Plot to blow up Parliament. Traditionally they burn Guy Fawkes in effigy plus that of another, more contemporary figure. For 2017 the, uh, winner is Harvey Weinstein. Here is the upper half of the 36-foot painting to get […]

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David French of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America point out former FBI director James Comey’s evaluation of how untrustworthy much of the media was when reporting on Russia and the 2016 elections. They also discuss the major political disaster that befell British conservatives in the snap election Thursday, badly weakening the party and strengthening the […]

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We here in America have a similar problem, dear Englishmen and Englishwomen. We, too, have those in our midst who rage against us and want to kill us and torture us. More

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Somewhere around the time of my eleventh birthday, and just when I would have been entering the sixth grade, had I been living in the USA, my parents unceremoniously dumped me at The Abbey School, Malvern Wells, and my English boarding school experience began. I’m sure they meant well. I’d had a rocky and circuitous […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Powerline’s Steven F. Hayward

 

Steven Hayward joins us at Whiskey Politics to discuss Trump, Russia, the media’s double standard, North Korea, his insider’s perspective of UC Berkeley, single payer healthcare in California, Theresa May and the British election, and of course, James Bond, 007.

Steven F. Hayward is currently senior resident scholar at the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley and a visiting lecturer at Boalt Hall Law School. He was previously the Ronald Reagan Distinguished Visiting Professor at Pepperdine University’s Graduate School of Public Policy, and was the inaugural visiting scholar in conservative thought and policy at the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2013-14. From 2002 to 2012 he was the F.K. Weyerhaeuser Fellow in Law and Economics at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington DC, and has been senior fellow at the Pacific Research Institute in San Francisco since 1991.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Bloody Cross

 

Tradition has it that, on April 23 in AD 303, a young and promising Roman soldier in the army of the Emperor Diocletian was beheaded after gruesome torture, and died professing his Christian faith to the end.

Very little is known of his life, but it’s believed he was born into a devout Christian family, perhaps in Cappadocia, an ancient district of Anatolia, somewhere between AD 270 and 280, and that he was raised at least partly in his mother’s home city of Lydda (Lod), in what is now central Israel.

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A lot of ink has been spilled (digital and otherwise) about the unconscionable abstention of the Obama Administration in the UN Security Council’s condemnation of Israel this past week. What I am not seeing very much of is mention of the perfidy of some of Israel’s other erstwhile “allies” specifically the United Kingdom and New […]

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The Left’s Next Battlefront If you thought the transgender bathroom was the hill upon which the progressive movement would die, get ready for the next outrageous little war the left is waging against common sense. Last week the City of San Francisco passed an amendment (9-2) to lower the voting age to 16 years old. It will appear […]

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First a caveat: I am a British born son of a capitalist who left England with his family for economic policy reasons (pre Thatcher). Second: I am a small business advocate who sees first-hand how ever increasing regulatory atmosphere stifles business owners. While not a total Austrian economist, (I heavily lean toward Milton Friedman & Adam […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. How Would you Vote on Independence for Scotland?

 

AN00090676_001_lTwo views:

Today’s Wall Street Journal editorial page:

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Matthew Yglesias: Not the Sharpest Tool in the Vox

 

Time ZonesLongtime readers are well aware that I do not take Matthew Yglesias seriously as a thinker. Yglesias is one of the sources of inspiration — if not the source — for Yousefzadeh’s Law, which states that “[t]here is no meritocracy in the field of punditry.” (Alternately, one may use the Peter Principle to explain Yglesias’s rise in the punditry world.)

Today, Yglesias gives us yet another reason to wonder whether his entire career in punditry has just been one long attempt to troll the planet. He advocates — dear God, I really don’t believe this! — abolishing all time zones, and having all of us run on Greenwich Mean Time.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. I’m So Gay I Don’t Even Care about Football

 

shutterstock_192275081According to Blue Yeti, if I post a piece under a headline like that I’ll get lots of traffic.

But it’s true. Football — or soccer, as you will insist on calling it — is a yob’s game. I feel no more shamed or embarrassed by England’s premature exit from the World Cup than I would had we, say, been knocked out of the world tiddlywinks championship or, let’s pick an even sillier game, the Super Bowl.

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