Tag: Employment Law

Richard Epstein discusses the history behind America’s anti-discrimination laws and explains why they’re not well-suited for the modern economy

Richard Epstein examines the deregulatory progress being made by the Trump Administration, explains the new tax law’s implication for blue states, and imagines the consequences of a world in which the US withdraws from NAFTA.

Member Post

 

Back in the summer, the Department of Labor announced a proposed rule change to overtime / hourly wages – effectively forcing all businesses to put any employee under their arbitrary threshold (Approx $50,500) on an hourly pay scale, regardless of their exemption status.  This was targeted to start in 2016.  Is this rule actually going […]

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The NLRB’s Labor Market Mischief

 

shutterstock_62462134Under last week’s decision by the Democratic majority on the National Labor Relations Board, we are about to see a dramatic shift in what constitutes an “employer.” Before this ruling, that term covered firms that hire their own workers, and the NLRB subjected those firms to the collective bargaining obligations under the National Labor Relations Act. Under its new definition, the majority expanded that term to cover any firm that outsources the hiring and management of employees to a second firm over which it retains some oversight function. In its decision, the NLRB refers to such firms and those to whom they outsource the hiring as “joint employers.” No longer, the majority says, must the employer’s control be exercised “directly and immediately.” Now “control exercised indirectly—such as through an intermediary—may establish joint-employer status.” As I note in my new column for Defining Ideas:

…[T]he new joint employer rules will likely batter today’s already grim labor market, as they will not only disrupt the traditional workplace but will completely wreck the well established franchise model for restaurants and hotels. As the majority conceded, the so-called joint employer does not even know so much as the social security number of its ostensible employees. It has no direct control over the way in which the current employer treats its workers, and yet could be hauled into court for its alleged unfair labor practices. That second firm knows little or nothing about the conditions on the ground in the many businesses with which it has forged these alliances, which eases the operations for both. Those advantages will be lost if the joint employer rule holds up in court. At the very least, the majority’s decision would require each and every one of these contracts and business relationships to be reworked to handle the huge new burden that will come as a matter of course, leaving everyone but the union worse off than before.

It would be one thing, perhaps, if the majority saw the light at the end of the tunnel. But over and over again it disclaims any grand pronouncements, making the legal question of who counts as an employer a work in progress that will be finished no time soon. Against this background it is irresponsible to undo the current relationships by a party-line vote. That point should also be clear to the courts and to Congress. The quicker this unfortunate decision is scrubbed from the law books, the better.

The Libertarian Podcast: Uber, Lyft, and the Future of Independent Contractors

 

The left, increasingly unwilling to tolerate any social arrangements not tailored to the exact specifications of the state, has recently set its sights on dramatically narrowing businesses’ abilities to classify workers as independent contractors. In this week’s episode of The Libertarian Podcast, Professor Epstein looks at how a pair of California lawsuits against car services Uber and Lyft are advancing that goal — and what it might mean for the broader economy. Come for the legal and economic analysis, stay to hear Richard try his hardest to restrain his contempt at the mention of Robert Reich’s name.