Tag: Emergency Preparedness

Cryptic Phone Message is No April Fools

 

Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida issued a stay-at-home order that will go into effect Friday night at midnight. Our roads and byways are already empty, except for grocery shoppers and local labor that is still on job sites (i.e., painters, carpenters, etc.). Restaurants are closed – take-out only if they can. So a few minutes ago, a solemn and serious message came over our landline from our local authorities stating the new order. They said our local sheriff’s office will be making more clarifications available and take questions and answers at a certain time tomorrow. We get messages like this when an impending hurricane is approaching, or other weather hazards like extreme heat, where we are asked to conserve energy. But nothing like this.

I watched on our local PBS station the story of the 1918 Flu — how it started, escalated, the tolls. It was appalling and I couldn’t finish watching it. I was trying to understand how worldwide epidemics begin and how they take the world by storm. It’s a different world since 1918. Even with SARS, Bird Flu, and Swine Flu, the swiftness of this terrible scourge across the world is nothing like we have ever experienced. I’m scared and still working. So is my husband.

I picked up some extra items at the store today – they were out of toilet paper at an early hour. I feel very fortunate and blessed – we have no debt and worked hard the last few years to get there. We have some savings and are frugal.  I have a small garden. I can get through a measly 30 days. I am scared for those that can’t. I’m shocked by a text where our local church asks us to pray for a parishioner who is having a foot amputated and her husband cannot be there because of COVID-19 restrictions. Funerals are limited to only a few family members, so good-byes have to be done from a distance.

Member Post

 

My sister who lives in Maryland told me that she was watching a TV station that is out of Baltimore this morning, when a red ticker tape came across the screen with the following information: There will be a weekly mandatory test of the Emergency Broadcasting System, starting February 18, 2019, lasting for five minutes […]

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Surviving Hurricane Michael – Part One

 

Sunday, October 7th – As a property manager in the Florida Panhandle, I awaken to text from customer, “Can you empty frig of perishables due to the tropical storm?” “Yes – no problem” I answer, then ask myself what tropical storm? I pull up weather.com and see something has just formed in the Caribbean, heading for the Gulf of Mexico. I alert my husband. “Oh? Ok.” And it’s off to visit in-laws in Panama City Beach.

Monday, October 8th, Columbus Day – Tropical storm likely to form into a CAT 1 – head out to prep properties for possible CAT 1 hurricane. I procrastinate going shopping, am out of my usual food, etc. Decide to head to Walmart Santa Rosa Beach early 9:00 AM. Store is packed, employees said water is almost gone, sheriff’s department stocking up. I decide to top off gas – head home and unload groceries – head out to Scenic Highway 30A to prepare properties for storm. Finish late afternoon – pass gas station with long lines and cop directing traffic. Encounter many tourists in golf carts, kids in bathing suits, large groups riding bikes, grills firing up, a jolly mood this holiday weekend, no one concerned, party atmosphere, roads clogged. One woman asks where should I gas up — she hasn’t a drop, her large SUV with Texas tags sits in the driveway. I said go now and fill up – may be evacuations tomorrow. She’s shocked as she walks her dog. Start to see yellow bags covering gas pumps. I go home and start filling plastic bags with ice.

Nicole Gelinas and Brian Anderson discuss recent disaster-relief efforts in the United States, the federal government’s role in such assistance, and how national flood insurance and other recovery programs could be reformed.

Since 2005, Washington has spent nearly $300 billion on disaster recovery, with state and local governments spending billions more. This figure doesn’t even include last year’s devastating storm season, which ravaged Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

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My sister and I were talking over the phone about Just In Time. Her frig flaked out and her not very old stove was working at half capacity, so she decided to bite the bullet and order new appliances. The local Lowes in her area said no problem, we can have these delivered in a […]

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Member Post

 

 I just saw this headline while in a restaurant this evening – it is not in the headlines on MSM today. I didn’t hear a thing about it until seeing the headline this evening on a TV monitor. This may be affecting gas prices or even water supply to your areas – heads up and […]

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