Tag: Elon Musk

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Last week, Elon Musk announced he was changing Twitter to the new brand, called simply ‘X’.  The announcement was a surprise, classic Musk, and it came in the form of a letter to employees.  The new X will feature an ‘everything app’, which will include various communication platforms, and ‘financial opportunities including banking. (my bold) […]

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Quote of the Day: On Making Progress

 

“Anyway, it’s hard to iterate though when people are on every mission. You can’t just be blowing stuff up ’cause you’re gonna kill people. Starship does not have anyone on board so we can blow things up. It’s really helpful.” – Elon Musk

The Starship test did not get as far as second-stage ignition. That does not mean it was a failure. Rather it was the first step in testing — using a test to destruction test philosophy. The main goal of the test was to get it off the launch pad and not to get it into orbit. All components in the test were intended to be discarded. Both the first and second stages were early versions of the hardware, which had been replaced by better designs. Rather than scrap them, Musk opted to use them in a launch test. (In fact, newer versions of the two stages already exist, to be expended in the next rounds of tests.) Hardware (even launch pads) can be replaced. Time and lives lost cannot.

It’s media day in our year-end Three Martini Lunch awards and Jim and Greg have plenty to say about how things were covered – if they were covered at all.  Specifically, they look at the stories the mainstream media covered far too much, the ones they conveniently ignored because they didn’t fit their narrative, and they highlight what they saw as the best stories of 2022.

The Character Assassination of Elon Musk

 

There was a time when Elon Musk was the darling of the left. After all, he made a fortune with an internet company (first Zip2, and then X.com/PayPal) and decided to use that fortune to make electric vehicles that would revolutionize the transport industry.  Along the way, he formed a rocket ship company and a satellite internet company.

People became infatuated with Musk, and he reveled in the fame and attention, always looking for the next bigger splash he could make. In some ways, he reminds me of Steve Jobs of Apple, who pushed for computers and devices that people thought were sexy and cool while still being functional and easy to use.

His foray into EVs is a prime example of this. Years before they became commonplace, Musk realized (much like Thomas Edison had realized) that EVs without charging stations were useless. So, he embarked on a program to place charging stations at critical points so that his drivers would be able to recharge while on long trips. This is why there is a Tesla station smack bad in between San Antonio and Houston in a little town called Flatonia, where I often stopped for a drink and/or snack while making that drive myself. Tesla put in a charging station about a mile and a half from my home right off I-35 north of San Antonio, going towards Austin. Many other companies are investing in EVs, but it would not be an exaggeration that Musk and Tesla seemed to capture the imagination of people.  Have you ever heard of a Fisker?

Federalist Radio Hour Host Emily Jashinsky is in for Jim today. Emily and Greg start by dissecting the left’s full meltdown over Twitter suspending several journalists on the left for violating the new doxxing rules. They also discuss the impact Twitter has in exposing media bias and whether Elon Musk’s actions break his pledge to champion free speech. They’re also furious as Philadelphia public schools plan to impose a mask mandate on students when they return in January just as the damage done to poor and minority students in California from being out of school becomes clearer. Finally, they wonder what exactly Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg does following reports he was vacationing in Portugal just a week before the nation was threatened with an economy-crippling railroad strike.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis for blasting Apple’s nauseating practices of silencing American voices it disagrees with and groveling before the Chinese government by making it harder for protesters there to get their messages out. They also groan as the crisis in Haiti is on the brink of collapse and the Biden administration fails to get other nations to take the lead on the response. And they discuss whether Kevin McCarthy will have the 218 votes needed to become speaker after at least two GOP members say they won’t back him on the House floor come January.

Strike a Blow for Free Speech

 

Those people who consider themselves as the prince-electors are aiming to destroy the Elon Musk-owned Twitter unless they are able to bring Musk to heel.  Many advertisers have been pressured into stopping or suspending their advertising on the platform, and Apple is apparently thinking of banning Twitter from the App Store.

As Musk said yesterday: “This is a battle for the future of civilization. If free speech is lost even in America, tyranny is all that lies ahead.”

Twitter Buyout Going Ahead?

 

Despite the ongoing litigation, I’ve remained cautiously optimistic that Elon Musk might yet buy Twitter and clean house. Now there’s word that he may go ahead with it after all.

I’m delighted and hope he continues. I returned to Twitter after a 13-year absence when Musk announced his intention to buy the platform. I’ve remained there in hopes that the sale would eventually go through: failing that, I’ll eventually leave, because it remains a cesspool of censorious leftism — and, yes, there are an awful lot of fake accounts.

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In Robert Heinlein’s 1950 story The Man Who Sold the Moon, the first manned lunar landing is not a government project.  Rather, it is the achievement of entrepreneur/industrialist Delos D Harriman, known to his friends and associates as ‘D.D.”  Some have seen a resemblance between Heinlein’s fictional character and the real-life Elon Musk.   Harriman has […]

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Email exhibits in the litigation against Musk show a breakdown between Musk and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund (PIF) over funding. This may explain Musk’s recent statements defending his tweet: “…Funding secured.” An interesting coincidence may be the relative timing of a PIF investment in Tesla competitor (hated rival) Lucid Motors. Preview […]

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If Musk Takes Over Twitter, What Next?

 

The universe of social media is now seeking to understand Elon Musk’s audacious bid to acquire all the shares of Twitter at a price of $54.20—$44 billion in total—that was initially accepted by the Twitter board of directors on April 25. Many regulatory and business hurdles still lurk between this initial agreement and the completed purchase. And the low break-up fee of $1 billion is seen as a sign that the transaction may yet founder.

The uncertainty over the deal’s future has not stopped, however, the nonstop speculation of what it will mean for the future of social media. By and large, these assessments are divided along sharp political lines. Right-wing stalwarts like Ben Shapiro chortle that the new deal promises to usher in a new age of Internet freedom by reforming how Twitter conducts itself, which in turn will lead to greater transparency. Musk has called himself a free speech “absolutist” who believes that free speech “is the bedrock of a functional democracy, and Twitter is the digital town square where matters vital to the future of humanity are debated.” That optimism has not—to put it mildly—been shared by the political left, which has already outdone itself by denouncing him in an NBC news report—ironically relying on overheated tweets—as “a white nationalist-sympathizingtax-dodginganti-unionanti-free speech, ‘dystopian neocolonialist’ plutocrat tainted by his family’s background in apartheid South Africa, where Musk was born in 1971.”

There is little doubt that part of this fear is based on the simple view that Musk not only contributes to a greener environment, but—gasp­—“is a libertarian edgelord billionaire” who does not toe the progressive line, a climate activist told NBC. This pending takeover has prompted prominent progressive thinkers to forsake their Twitter accounts to protest what looks, at least to them, more like a political coup than a corporate takeover.

TechFreedom Internet policy counsel Corbin K. Barthold joins Brian Anderson to discuss Elon Musk’s successful bid for Twitter and its implications for free speech, tech regulation, and the Internet.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

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Everyone agrees Elon Musk is no dummy.  Like any sentient being, Elon knows Big Tech is much more supportive of left wing causes than right wing causes.  And he’s no left winger.  He also knows the left sees Twitter as “theirs.”  He obviously knows Twitter actively advances leftist causes.   And here are the two Really […]

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Congratulations to the nation’s richest and perhaps its most interesting man, Elon Musk, for his $44 billion purchase of the social media site, Twitter. Launched around 2008 (when I joined) along with Facebook and other “big tech” initiatives, it has transmogrified from a “town hall” to that church scene in the first Kingsman movie, where […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome what appears to be the Biden administration’s grudging admission that there won’t be a new Iran nuclear deal. They also hammer President Biden for reportedly getting ready to pander to his base through massive student loan forgiveness and explain who will really benefit. And they find the timing curious as Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey demands “algorithmic justice” after Elon Musk buys Twitter.

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Jeff Bezos recently touched off a mini firestorm when he suggested that free-speech enthusiast Elon Musk may be vulnerable to pressure from Beijing to put his own finger on the sacred algorithmic scales to protect Chinese Communist Party interests. Bezos later walked it back a bit, but he should have stood his ground. This is […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they mostly welcome Elon Musk’s purchase of Twitter and promises of speech protection and dissect why so many on the left are hysterical about this news. They also sigh as Biden climate envoy John Kerry declares war on natural gas and promises it will be dead within 10 years. And they get a kick out of Utah “independent” U.S. Senate candidate Evan McMullin’s empty vow to caucus with neither Republicans nor Democrats if he is elected this year.

 

Twitter, Elon Musk, and the Great Reset

 

Since Elon Musk made his (very generous) offer to buy Twitter — ostensibly on the basis that it aggressively bans conservative voices (Donald Trump, The Babylon Bee, LibsofTikTok,  Defiant L’s) and suppresses the free exchange of ideas — an interesting Confederacy has emerged in opposition.

  1. Unhinged Leftists
  2. The Left-Wing punditry, who have compared the prospect of free speech on Twitter to Nazi Germany and claimed it opposes a grave threat to freedom and democracy.
  3. Corporate media, which dramatically have declared that the prospect of free speech on Twitter will lead to “massive, life and globe-altering consequences.”
  4. Never-Trumpers employed by corporate media, with Max Boot declaring that social media isn’t censored enough, and David French frets that no longer censoring the Babylon Bee will make Twitter “more toxic” and agrees with Boot that Twitter should be censored more. Ironically, up until last week, both of these were firmly aligned with the “Twitter is a private corporation and can censor whoever it wants and if you don’t like it, start your own Twitter” corporatist, Bush-Republican philosophy.
  5. Gigantic Financial Enterprises including Vanguard, Black Rock, and Saudi Arabian Billionaire Al Waleed bin Talal Al Saud are all moving to block Musk’s acquisition.
  6. The Biden Administration, which has sicced the hounds of the SEC and DOJ on Musk for … (checks notes) … filing the wrong form when he initially purchased his 9 percent share of Twitter.

What do all of these players have in common? Obviously, all of them hate Donald Trump worse than cancer. But the other common factor is all of these groups aligned against Elon Musk — against free speech on the internet, really — are invested in the Great Reset. Twitter, despite being embraced by only about 10% of the American population, has a disproportionate influence in business, media, and politics (which are increasingly the same thing). The global elites whose ultimate objective is to rule over a public that “owns nothing and is happy” feel a need to control this tool and its influence.