Tag: elitism

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Via Ace of Spades, this headline from the Washington Post is unintentionally hilarious: “It’s time to give the elites a bigger say in choosing the president.” If it were truly honest, it would say, “It’s time to give the elites back their bigger say in choosing the president.” For a couple of centuries now we’ve been […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QOTD: Calvin Coolidge and the Declaration of Independence

 

Calvin Coolidge, born on July 4, 1872, was known as “Silent Cal,” but wasn’t afraid to speak out about his Conservative values. He clearly rejected the revisionist approach to the Declaration of Independence and demonstrated his beliefs in an exemplary way. In fact, he believed that changing the meaning of the Declaration was not progress, but a step backward in our understanding of the Founders, and the values that we hold.

How unfortunate that the Progressives of today don’t realize they are trying to take us back to more primitive, tribal times when people insisted they were superior to others, based on their intellect, education and the color of their skin. They clearly do not believe that we are created equal (since Conservatives are a different species), that the wishes of the governed should direct the work of the government (since the government knows best), and the more government, the better (which ensures the massive growth of the administrative state). After all, the government and its elites are quite prepared to tell us how to do everything: how to live our lives, what to invest in, and what to believe.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

An article on parking tickets by Stephen L. Carter at Bloomberg punched my buttons today, particularly the brazen condescension in its final paragraph. Mr. Carter begins with a personal anecdote, one truly shared by many in his and this audience — (slow) paying a parking ticket. He adds scattered statistics on the public’s propensity for […]

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Victor Davis Hanson argues that the best way to upend insular elites is to relocate political institutions out of cosmopolitan settings.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. When Elites Slip Up and Say What They Really Think

 

While speaking before an audience of wealthy oligarchs in Dubai, George W. Bush opened his yap and told us what he really thought about illegal immigrants.

“Americans don’t want to pick cotton at 105 degrees, but there are people who want [to] put food on their family’s tables and are willing to do that. We ought to say thank you and welcome them.”

In an era of technology and automation, does tough physical work still matter? Victor Davis Hanson says the answer is yes — and that, in fact, we have an innate desire to do work with our own two hands. Listen as he explores the cultural, intellectual, and psychological reasons that we should be wary of a future that promises the end of manual labor.

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New York Times columnist Bret Stephens wants millions and millions of immigrants to flood into America; because Americans are lazy, no-good, and don’t make enough babies. His column is equal parts praise for immigrants, all of whom are amazing; and diatribe against his fellow Americans, all of whom are terrible, apparently.  A study by the […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America groan as Aetna announces it will pull out of Virginia and Iowa’s last insurer is leaving most of the state for the individual marketplace. They’re stunned as more Republicans tell pollsters they trust the government to do the right thing more than Democrats do. And they react as an MSNBC contributor declares that anyone who doesn’t rely on government is elitist.

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April is the cruelest month in many ways, including being the anniversary of a terrible act of savagery. In this case, the savage act also led to the creation of one of the best known paintings of the Modern era, 80 years ago. In the late 1930s, Spain was undergoing the turmoil of civil war. […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

In his 1922 book, American Individualism, Herbert Hoover, then Secretary of Commerce in the Harding administration, wrote of his cabinet colleagues: That our system has avoided the establishment and domination of class has a significant proof in the present Administration in Washington, Of the twelve men comprising the President, Vice-President, and Cabinet, nine have earned […]

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Victor Davis Hanson examines the constituent parts of Donald Trump’s political beliefs and attempts to deduce the animating principles of Trumpism.

Victor Davis Hanson provides cultural and historical context for Donald Trump’s presidential victory and speculates on what the early days of the new administration may yield.

Victor Davis Hanson explains why many Americans are increasingly removed from the nation’s core political, economic, and cultural institutions.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. We Are Not Racists, Hillary

 

Hillary Clinton’s recent disparagement of Trump supporters as a “basket of deplorables” was an error on many levels. It was a political error, worthy indeed of Donald Trump at his most vain, where Hillary chose to slander a segment of the American electorate in order to bask in the laughter of her audience – thereby violating the sound political principle that you are best to criticize your opponent, not his supporters.

Her joke was a moral error in its condescension and hatred toward a distant and largely unknown rabble upon whom she and her howling acolytes projected their own hatred in the form of a mostly imagined racism.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. PowerNoonan

 

nailgunWhat is this a picture of? It is a nail gun, a high-quality piece of equipment that will put nail after nail into board after board. Whatever you need nailed, this thing will nail it, consistently and accurately. And that is precisely why it should be called a Noonanator. Or a PowerNoonan. Or a Pneumatic Noonanizer. To understand why, here’s an article in the Wall Street Journal by its namesake titled “How Global Elites Forsake Their Countrymen:”

The challenge of integrating different cultures, negotiating daily tensions, dealing with crime and extremism and fearfulness on the street—that was put on those with comparatively little, whom I’ve called the unprotected. They were left to struggle, not gradually and over the years but suddenly and in an air of ongoing crisis that shows no signs of ending—because nobody cares about them enough to stop it.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. In the Art World, They Think They Are Better Than You

 
Albert Barr's Infamous Modern Art Flow Chart of 1936
Albert Barr’s Infamous Modern Art Flow Chart of 1936

There’s nothing new under the sun. “The Boston Manifesto,” a statement from concerned members of that city’s Institute of Contemporary Art in 1948, provided an accurate prophecy of the bubble of exclusion, irrelevance, and big money hypocrisy that today’s establishment art world encourages:

“Modern art, the manifesto declared, had become ‘a cult of bewilderment’; the gap between critics and artists and the public had produced ‘a … playground for double-talk, opportunism, and chicanery at the public expense.’ Modern art had ‘come to signify for millions something unintelligible, even meaningless…’”

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What is provocative art in a hyper-politicized age? Read More View Post

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Science: Your Kid’s Not Special

 

OK, I may have taken a little bit of a shortcut there in the headline. What Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck is actually saying in the pages of Scientific American is that if you actually want your children to be special, just about the worst thing you can do is tell them that they already are:

Our society worships talent, and many people assume that possessing superior intelligence or ability—along with confidence in that ability—is a recipe for success. In fact, however, more than 35 years of scientific investigation suggests that an overemphasis on intellect or talent leaves people vulnerable to failure, fearful of challenges and unwilling to remedy their shortcomings.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. “Hey Gruber – Who’s Stupid Now?”

 

Just when you’ve convinced yourself that those crazy conspiracy theories are the effects of an overactive imagination, just an an exaggerated and unjustifiable paranoia, someone posts something like Gruber’s confession, confirming everything the counselors and analysts told us to ignore, forcing us right back into the political looney bin. We gasp and say, “we were right all along.” Obamacare is the Soylent Green of leftist political strategy. Democrats are manipulative and disrespectful, even contemptuous of the electorate. It is a party that really is led by Czars, snarky, egotistical, academic intellectuals who have no desire to lead, not even to convince. These people have such contempt for the public that their intentions from the outset are to mislead, deceive and even coerce to achieve the outcomes they desire.

When Mitt Romney was filmed deprecating the other 47% of Americans, those who pay no income tax and those who rely on the government for welfare, housing, food stamps and other subsidies, this was an “a-ha!” moment for Democrats. “See! He does hate the poor!” they cried. No doubt that was galvanizing, but the point Romney was making generally was based in logic and fact – folks who rely on government transfer payments are incentivized to support those who support continuation of those payments, not those (Republicans) who question the economic reality that underlies them. This fact provides a built-in advantage for Democrats who promote the welfare state and court its beneficiaries.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Conservatism, Meritocracy, and the New Elite

 

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal…

I would argue that this self-evident truth is actually only half true. Certainly, all men are entitled to equal human dignity and equal standing before the law, but it is also self-evidently untrue that all men are created equal in ability.