Tag: electoral college

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https://www.change.org/p/electoral-college-electors-electoral-college-make-hillary-clinton-president-on-december-19 Hahahaha  More

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[Edit: This is not an attack on the Electoral College. It’s an attack on using the “national popular vote” numbers as being representative of the will of the American people.]   More

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When a presidential candidate loses the popular vote but wins the electoral vote, it is seen as a “flaw” in the electoral system. That’s incorrect. It is by design. The electoral college was created before Presidents were chosen, almost directly, by voters. One principle still applies. The founders wanted to protect the small states from […]

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Simple question. I always wonder “why is New Mexico always blue”? None of its neighbors is reliably blue and only one is what we might call “purple” (Colorado). Every year since 1992 it has gone Dem except for 2004. So, what gives? More

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My conservative California friends are pretty comfortable with not voting for Trump. They know they are outmatched, and California will be sending Democrat delegates to the Electoral College this winter. But what if we determined the Presidency by popular vote? Would it change the way people played the political game, and would it reinvigorate conservative […]

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How can Trump win? By losing! The trick? Faithless electors. Here’s one right here: http://www.politico.com/story/2016/10/electoral-college-trump-clinton-229406 More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. If New Mexico Voters Want Trump to Be President, They Should Vote for Johnson

 

Gary-Johnson-New-MexicoIn a recent poll by the Albuquerque Journal, New Mexico voters were asked which candidate they support: 35% said Hillary Clinton, 31% said Donald Trump, 24% said Gary Johnson, and 2% said Jill Stein.

As these numbers suggest, if a significant share of Trump supporters were to vote for Johnson, then this would give Johnson a plurality of New Mexico’s voters, which by New Mexico law, would give Johnson all five of New Mexico’s electoral votes.

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It has been suggested from time to time that the institution of the Electoral College be abolished as the mechanism for selecting the President of the United States. Most advocates of eliminating the Electoral College support some form of national election, a “one-person-one-vote” direct democracy. Simple, right? The candidate with the most votes nationwide wins. […]

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How would you have voted in your state’s primary election if you knew the final choice would be between Cruz and Trump? The GOP shot itself in the foot yet again. Through its foolish and unjust system of staggered primaries, it not only refuses voters in later states the opportunity to vote for a full […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Electoral Opponent Which Cannot Be Defeated: Math

 

270 to winThe website 270towin.com has a fascinating interactive tool for looking at how the Electoral College has voted and conceivably will vote in the near future.

You can look at the 2012 election results and see where Mitt Romney needed to win in order to get to 270 electoral votes (click individual states to change how they voted). He needed to take some 63 electoral votes away from Obama in order to win, by the way.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Preserve the Constitution by Fixing the Electoral College

 
1200px-Scene_at_the_Signing_of_the_Constitution_of_the_United_States
Aha! Perfect!

The American Founders set up a very successful system of government, a constitutional order that has outlasted most other governments. This makes the Constitution a document worth preserving, and any proposed change demands close scrutiny. However, there is a world of difference between changes that fundamentally alter the relationship between the government and the people, and changes that update the Constitution’s ability to accomplish its original purpose. The first types of change — championed by Wilson and the Roosevelts — has failed at almost every turn. The second type is provided for in the Constitution itself by its amendment process (Article V), and was used by the Founders themselves following the Election of 1800 to improve the process by which a president is chosen. It is this type of change that we ought to consider valid and reasonable to keep a functioning Constitution. And today, we may need to again consider changing the means by which Presidents are selected.

Unfortunately, too many conservatives remain obstinately opposed to any structural changes. This, doubtlessly, comes from a admirable and rightful respect for the original document, but betrays a failure to distinguish between the types of changes. As such, conservatives tend to get caught-up with the defense of the Electoral College on the grounds that the Founders did not want the general public to choose the president, and wanted an elite layer between the populace and the selection of the chief executive. This is a good argument on the basis of the theory of the Electoral College, but it ignores its reality. And through it, many misguided conservatives are led to do a disservice to the Constitution by refusing to rescue its original intended ends by correcting the imperfect means it describes to achieve them.

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I’m aware of the difficulties of starting a third party run this late in the process. However, the circumstances are extraordinary this year. If a conservative candidate (e.g., Ben Sasse) ran third party as a write-in candidate, would it be possible for that candidate to get enough electoral votes to deny 270 electoral votes to […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Jon Gabriel on Superdelegates

 

Ricochet Editor-in-Chief Jon Gabriel talks with OANN host Liz Wheeler about undemocratic Democrats and the tough primary math for Bernie Sanders. They also cover superdelegates, the electoral college, and differences between the party conventions. Jon will appear every Thursday on “Tipping Point with Liz Wheeler“.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Five Ways Rubio’s the GOP’s White House Ticket

 

1) That post-Iowa caucus speech:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Electoral College Tweak?

 

ElectoralCollege2012.svgLast week, Peter linked to an excellent Prager University video describing the electoral college and describing the benefits of this (admittedly) arcane part of the American Constitution. For anyone rusty on the subject, I recommend it as an excellent primer, though some additional reading brings out a lot of details that didn’t fit into the video.

In another Prager video, the same presenter rightly excoriates the National Popular Vote Compact, which is a truly terrible idea that (unfortunately) has gained a lot of momentum. It’s not, however, the only constitutional alternative to the current system. Indeed, states have incredible discretion over how to award their votes, and the current near-consensus is unusual and not what was originally in place: during the early days of the Republic, a common method was for state legislatures to choose their state’s electors (a system I rather like, though it could result in some really nasty politics).

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My husband and I came up with this on the 15 mile trip to work this morning. We talked the pros and cons of eliminating the current two-party system. I’m sure the Ricochetti has other ideas, but this is what we developed so far. Pros More

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It’s the last class of our summer session and Troy Senik and Professors Yoo and Epstein are not letting class out early. This week, they ponder Romney as a judge picker (is that a legal term?), Richard and John give an advice to those offered federal appointments — and in the process inspire the title for this week’s episode, a frank discussion on the electoral college (is there any other kind?), and we wrap up with a look at Apple v. Samsung.

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