Tag: electoral college

Jim and Greg offer their reactions to demonstrators flooding into the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday in protest of the Electoral Vote counting process. They also examine the president’s response and one good thing that happened in the wake of all the chaos.

Join Jim and Greg to help you through a tough day for conservatives. First, they cringe as it appears Democrats won both Senate races in Georgia because a lot of Republicans didn’t show up. They also discuss how a Chuck Schumer-led Senate means a rough two years are in store for conservatives. And despite a lot of anticipation for dramatic action at today’s Joint Session of Congress on the 2020 Electoral College vote, they explain why there’s not much Vice President Pence or any other Republicans can do to reverse the outcome.

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With all the other stuff, here’s my feel-good moment. It’s very personal. Here are the Indiana Electors casting their votes…and my Dad is among them. In the first shots of the House floor (where I used to work), he is on the right, seated, and topmost. Something to feel good about. Way to go, Dad. […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the first supplies of the new Pfizer coronavirus vaccine being shipped out to inoculate medical personnel and vulnerable citizens. They also get a kick out of CNN and American Urban Radio Networks reporter April Ryan being horrified that someone secretly recorded and leaked a conversation with Joe Biden and then seriously agreeing with another reporter who mockingly suggested that the media should only report things that come from the Biden team. And they discuss the sexual harassment allegations made against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo by his former aide and how the media are instantly demanding proof when the accused is a Democrat.

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This presidential election apparently didn’t go the way I wanted it to, but I’ve spent a lot of time the last few weeks thinking about and discussing how great the Electoral College is—or, rather, how great a small-R republican alternative to a national popular vote is. Here’s a few reasons why I love our system. […]

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For nearly half a decade we have been told that the walls are closing in on the President of the United States. If it wasn’t Stormy Daniels it would be Russian Collusion; if not Russian Collusion then it would be the 25th Amendment; if not the 25th Amendment then the Emoluments Clause; if not the […]

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From American Thinker, https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2020/11/new_election_math_its_not_270_its_2624.html: It is the NEW 2021 Congress which would vote, and due to R house pickups Nov 3, the Democrats have just lost three delegations, and are on the verge of losing a fourth. The Democrats have now lost control of, and are now tied in: MN (now 4R, 4D), and MI (now 7R, 7D) and PA (now […]

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This is from an email I sent to an acquaintance and friends earlier today. One of my acquaintances, a rabid anti-Trump Democrat, called me up earlier to celebrate the news that Joe Biden has been “declared” the winner of the 2020 Presidential election. I hated to burst his bubble. But I told him that Joe […]

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Tara Ross, the nationally recognized author of Why We Need the Electoral College. On the eve of the 2020 election, they discuss the critical and controversial role of the Electoral College in determining which candidate will become the next President of the United States. Tara explains how the Electoral College functions, why the Framers established it, and why this key feature of the U.S. Constitution and electoral system has become such a lightning rod. They explore its historical role in balancing power between small and large states, encouraging candidates to build wide coalitions across numerous states and regions, and checking the excesses of popular passions. They also discuss the role of the Electoral College in helping to isolate closely contested elections to specific states, such as in Florida in 2000; and Tara shares thoughts on the current political landscape.

Stories of the Week: Results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) show troubling declines in grade 12 reading performance – will the results reinforce arguments to end testing? Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced she will no longer enforce the prohibition against religious organizations applying for federal funding for charter schools – opening charters to criticisms that opponents have long leveled, that these schools are not truly public.

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This isn’t so much an “article” as a conservation starter. I can’t help but imagine some election scenarios. Unfortunately, I can’t think of a single on that doesn’t result in major riots. I’ll just start the ball rolling, and I’ll read all replies, but it’s unlikely I will have the time to comment on them. […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Beware of Faithless Electors

 

As part of their populist platforms, Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders have vowed to get rid of the Electoral College, so that the U.S. President is chosen by a direct popular vote. Likewise, Pete Buttigieg has also pledged support for the initiative, with Amy Klobuchar indicating her openness to the proposal. That structural change, if made, would profoundly impact all future political campaigns, as candidates would ignore former swing states in order to run up tallies in populous places like California, Florida, New York, and Texas. The consequences that would follow from such a dramatic realignment of voting power would greatly increase the risk of election fraud, such that the ensuing nationwide recounts would make Bush v. Gore look like a modest political skirmish.

Progressives are highly unlikely to gain sufficient support to implement this major reform through constitutional amendment. But right now, two major Supreme Court cases—Colorado Department of State v. Baca and Chiafalo v. Washington—pose the serious risk of undermining the integrity of the Electoral College by changing the long-established practice that all electors must vote as a bloc to support the presidential nominee of their party. In 48 states, the entire state follows that winner-take-all mandate. In Maine and Nebraska, the winner-take-all system is done by congressional district.

But in the aftermath of the November 2016 election, which Trump won by 306 to 232 electoral votes, both of the named electors in each aforementioned case were committed to Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton but did not vote for her. In Colorado, Michael Baca, a Clinton elector, cast his ballot for then Ohio governor John Kasich; in Washington, Peter Bret Chiafalo voted for Republican Colin Powell. These two votes were not isolated events, as ten electors followed the same path in an attempt to block Donald Trump from becoming president by persuading enough Republican electors to defect so that Trump’s total would fall below 270 votes. Their acts of defiant independence brought forth prompt responses. Colorado replaced Baca with a new elector who voted for Clinton; Washington fined Chiafalo $1,000 for his action.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Anti-Tobacco Fanatics Lie like a Cheap Rug

 

Yes. They lie. Their lies, coming from allegedly left and right (social conservative) positions, are swathed in “good intentions” and focus on “the children.” Yet, any citizen, any member of Congress, any judge, Article II or Article III, and any president who has merely been alert to their environment as they walked past, at least, a hotel bar, knows the basic claim is a flat-out lie. Why? See for yourself:

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The U.S. Constitution is the greatest political document ever produced. Its durability has made the U.S. Government the longest surviving republic in the world. What makes the constitution durable – an intricate system of divided power – is also what makes it vulnerable. It is a carefully constructed system that only works well if all […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America break down the news of Maine and Nevada refusing to join the popular vote pact to change presidential elections. Michael Avenatti is on his way to losing his license to practice law. And Baltimore’s Mayor wants criminals to swap bullets for boxing gloves.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America admit that it’s good politics for President Trump and Republicans to postpone another effort to dismantle Obamacare until after the 2020 election but are frustrated that the GOP still doesn’t have a coherent plan almost a decade after Obamacare as passed. They also blast Beto O’Rourke as he calls for the abolishing of the electoral college because it goes all the way back to the founding and claims that it somehow perpetuates racial discrimination. And they get a kick out of reports that former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is reconsidering a 2020 presidential bid if Joe Biden decides not to run or becomes too damaged to have a decent shot at winning.

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Democrats have long been warm to the idea of eliminating the Electoral College simply due to their preference for centralization of power over granting power to the individual states. The outcomes of the 2000 and 2016 elections, wherein a GOP candidate won the Electoral College, and, accordingly, the election, despite running a deficit to the […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Reviewing “The Great Revolt” in the Context of Five Countrywide Types

 

Salena Zito and Brad Todd’s new book The Great Revolt is a great read, based on extensive interviews with Trump voters as well as a Great Revolt survey. It’s important to note, though, that in the survey and later for the book, there are only interviews with Trump supporters from a specific geographical region: Trump supporters hailing from the five “Rust Belt” states of Michigan, Ohio, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania; and even more specifically, from ten electorally-significant counties within these states.

Zito and Todd’s focus on Trump voters from behind the “Blue Wall” of rust-belt counties, which had been stubbornly blue before Trump, ought to be treasured for what it is: neither a description of American Trump voters in general, nor the final word on America’s new populist-conservative coalition, but a testament to the power of geography in our electoral process, and to the strategic importance of not overlooking those who might otherwise go overlooked.

In The Great Revolt, Zito and Todd identify “seven clusters of voters integral to [Trump’s] winning coalition.” These clusters are not meant to describe all types of Trump voters, or even the bulk of Trump voters; instead, they’re meant to describe crucial Trump voters: voters Zito and Todd believe were vital to Trump’s storming of the “Blue Wall” to achieve electoral victory. While Zito and Todd also argue that these seven types of voters serve as bellwethers for a more general populist-conservative realignment, it would be a mistake to lose sight of the fact that the “great” in The Great Revolt refers not to our country as a whole, but to the power of people in places which have lately been overlooked to make a great difference in our politics.