Tag: Egypt

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Turkish Trick or Treat?

 

A young veteran reminded me of the truly ancient roots of conflict in the Middle East, pointing to lines we do not even see on the sand and soil. This prompted me to return to a summary sketch I laid aside months ago, after fleshing out an account of what we now call Iran. Then the House of Representatives passed a non-binding resolution condemning the Ottoman Empire for committing the first genocide of the 20th Century…and 12 Republicans joined Rep. Ilhan Omar in opposing the resolution! What? Why? What follows is a single summary of the other three big players, historically, now known as Turkey, Egypt, and Saudi Arabia.

Iran and Egypt can point to the most ancient civilizations, as their progenitors were contemporary regional powers. The clash between them was captured in the ancient Hebrew texts, as the Jewish people were caught in the middle. Saudi Arabia comes next, with claims to punching far above their weight with armies fired by the fervor of a new faith, and more recently of being the secular and religious guardians of the faith. Finally, the Turks can claim to have been the most successful and latest power to rule the region for centuries after imposing final defeat on the (Christian) Eastern Roman empire.

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Killing time in an airport earlier this year, I noticed on the departures board a flight to San Juan. This was probably in Houston, as I see now that Austin has no such direct flights; but either way, I was intrigued. And I was surprised, by this feeling I mean, because I’d been to Puerto […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Tale of Two Tales Following Morsi’s Death

 

Mohammad Morsi, who was elected president of Egypt leading an Islamist party, died in court late Monday. He had been deposed by the military after imposing an Islamist constitution and showing his ties to the Muslim Brotherhood more clearly. The military acted after a second wave of popular unrest showed people wanted change, but not quite the change Morsi seemed to be delivering.

France24 reports Morsi was buried Tuesday, in keeping with the custom of burial as soon after death as possible:

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In light of the latest bout of protests in Iran, perhaps it is worth looking back at the “Arab Spring” generally. How does the Middle East look these days? What is the Arab Spring’s greatest success story? What is its worst failure?  More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Middle East: Are Ominous Clouds Forming?

 

It’s no surprise that disruptive situations are developing in the Middle East; that seems to be the normal state of affairs. Lately I’ve noticed some situations that independently would barely raise eyebrows; collectively, however, I’m concerned that the area is heating up more than usual, and I believe these events will affect not only the region, but will have implications for the US.

It’s been widely reported that Qatar supports terrorism, but you may not be aware of the level of that support.

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I remember when I was in Egypt for a brief visit three years ago how our ambassador there, Ann Patterson, was widely held in contempt by President Al-Sisi and a wide swath of the public for her support of the Muslim Brotherhood government of Mohamed Morsi that had just been deposed by a popular reaction […]

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There is a tension in every family between the older child and all the subsequent children, an assumption that being “the first born” comes with an inherent status. The idea in English Law (and in many ancient legal codes as well, including parts of Ancient Egyptian history) of primogeniture is tied to this: the first-born […]

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To hold President Barack Obama’s sealed college transcripts, of course. I know this opinion goes against the grain. More

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. ISIS vs. Russia?

 

Yesterday, CNN reported that US intelligence believes ISIS brought down Kogalymavia Flight 9268 — the Russian airline out of Egypt — with a bomb. This morning, the WSJ reports that the United Kingdom has come to the same conclusion and has grounded all flights out of Sharm El Sheikh, where the flight originated (there are thousands of Brits there currently on holiday). Several people on Ricochet have previously speculated that the plane was taken out by a bomb near its tail and the Islamic State has already claimed credit for this deed.

My question is this: what does it all mean? Is this the beginning of a broader campaign by ISIS against Russia? Will Chechnya once again explode in violence and terrorism? Will Russia become more involved against battling ISIS, at least to save face?

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A Russian airline has crashed in Egypt, leaving no survivors. Here are the facts so far: The aircraft was flying from Sharm al-Sheikh to St. Petersburg There were 224 people on board, almost all Russians, plus a few Ukrainians The aircraft was an 18 year old Airbus 321  The pilot sent a radio message about […]

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During the festival of Sukkot, we live in huts (“sukkot” means “booths”). Why? Because G-d commanded us to do so: You will dwell in booths for seven days; all natives of Israel shall dwell in booths. –Lev. 23:42. This is to remember, the Torah tells us, that we lived in booths in the wilderness between […]

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This post is a brief follow-up to a story I shared previously. El-Sisi, on the eve of the Al-Adha holiday and a visit to the UN, announced 100 pardons, mainly of people jailed under a law controlling protests. This includes a couple of Al-Jazeera journalists (one with Canadian citizenship) and some young human-rights activists (Sanaa Seif and […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Egypt Jails Al-Jazeera Journalists

 
"Abdel Fattah el-Sisi-عبد الفتاح السيسي" by Kremlin.ru. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
Abdel Fattah el-Sisi.” Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Over the weekend, an Egyptian court sentenced three Al-Jazeera journalists to three years in prison. One of them, Peter Greste, an Australian citizen, is back in Australia and was sentenced in absentia. One of the others, Mohamed Fahmy, is a Canadian citizen.

The charges against them are directly related to their journalistic activities, including not having proper licensing and reporting false news damaging to public security. I believe these charges were motivated by Al-Jazeera’s reporting that was favorable toward the Muslim Brotherhood. Egyptian President El-Sisi has said he favors deporting rather than jailing the foreigners, but will not interfere with the courts.

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In 1818, Percy Shelley & Horace Smith published their Ozymandias sonnets. Each sonnet is some kind of reflection on man’s situation & predicament in the world. Being that our own Dime has hindsight on the brain & Mr. Koler has reminded us of the wonders of Egypt, what say you we read these old sonnets again? […]

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The following comes from reading this book, Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt: Advanced Engineering in the Temple of the Pharaohs by Christopher Dunn. How good a sculptor do you have to be to chisel a face that is perfectly symmetrical? Well, it’s evidently pretty much impossible. In order to perform the perfection that was attained with […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Uncommon Knowledge: James Mattis on Political Islam and the Hope for Reform

 

In this newest excerpt from my conversation with James Mattis for Uncommon Knowledge, the retired general lays out the historical continuity of what he calls “political Islam” — and notes that there may yet be hope for reformers in the Middle East:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Libya and Egypt: United Arab Republic 2.0?

 

This was my first post on Ricochet, on February 23, 2011. In light of the latest savagery in the Maghreb, perhaps it’s time to revisit it. I edited the post to correct some formatting errors introduced when it was imported into Ricochet, which bumped it to the top of the Member Feed. That was not my intent; I just planned on a short post linking to the original article.

With the ongoing unrest in Egypt, there has been speculation that the military, which is now in charge, might be tempted to launch a military adventure in order to unite the country behind them and position those advocating a pluralistic society as unpatriotic in a time of crisis. Most of the worry has been about a potential conflict with Israel, but with the rapidly deteriorating situation in Libya, what if Egypt’s present rulers decided to roll the tanks West instead of East? This move would be taken “in order to secure the oil fields” and “in solidarity with our Arab brethren, who deserve protection from the tyrannical regime that has exploited them for so long”.

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This story by Roger Simon referencing the speech given by Egypt’s president, Al-Sisi, is a great example of how US aid, specifically military training and partnerships, can work out. The guy is effectively calling for a reformation in Islam. Who has had a great amount of contact and influence on how this guy thinks? The […]

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Egypt considers Gaza wall to block Hamas terror attacks The success of Israel’s controversial West Bank separation barrier in lowering suicide attacks on the Jewish state by as much as 90 percent, appears to have not gone unnoticed by Egypt which is now facing a comparable problem from Gaza-based Palestinian terrorists. Egypt appears to be […]

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The horrific images we’re seeing in the Middle East belie the larger truth. The Middle East is at its most promising moment since at least the fall of the Ottoman Empire a century ago. Most in the MidEast are primarily concerned with protecting themselves from Jihadists. This includes the Sunni and Shiite Jihadists themselves, who […]

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