Tag: Education

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Teachers and medical health professionals are mandatory reporters. They are required to learn about abuse, what abuse looks like, and how children may present when they have physical or psychological abuse. They are required to take a test and have a certification demonstrating competency. Some of us must even complete these competencies yearly. Perhaps it […]

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Liz Warren 2020!

 

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for February 16, 2018, it’s number 162, the Liz Warren 2020! edition of the show with your humble hosts, Todd Feinburg, radio guy and Mike Stopa nanophysicist. This week, in anticipation of her nomination, election and coronation in 2020, is our all Liz week! What’s the point of swimming upstream? Socialism is nigh. We didn’t build it! Who doesn’t need a shrill school marm to keep us all in line? Who doesn’t yearn for that Patron Saint of people who can’t read the fine print on their credit card application?

We will reveal some things you never knew about Granny Warren and discuss some things you know only too well.

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Question: To Stay or Leave Teaching in Public Schools?

 

I’m thinking about this question, and I’m curious what the Ricochetti might answer: Is it time to for this teacher to abandon the Public School system? Here’s some of the circumstances relating to the question:

  1. I hold K-8 multiple-subject and secondary Biology certificates, and I have over 20 years of classroom experience in grades 6 through 12.
  2. I’m also an evangelical Christian, white male, politically and socially conservative.
  3. My school district has adopted the Progressive doctrine of “Cultural Competence” based upon the philosophy that all social inequalities are the result of institutional “privilege.” Correcting this “privilege” means seeking “equity,” a short-hand term meaning equality of outcome on behalf of identified victims of “privilege.”
  4. I work in a state that allows the teachers union to withhold 100% of apportioned membership dues from my paycheck, and then forcing me to request to be reimbursed of whatever portion the union decides wasn’t spent advocating on my behalf (typically about 30% of the total withheld).
  5. I am required by law to teach district-approved curriculum and content. As a science teacher, this has included such scientifically dubious subjects as man-generated global climate change (and the associated advocacy for progressive solutions) and contentious social issues such as acceptance of transgender behavior.

So … here’s where I’m at: A local private Christian school has a job posting for a junior high/high school science position for next year. Do I pursue it? Or, do I stick with the public schools, on the basis that as a Christian, I have been called to be “salt and light” to the world?

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California, the land of anti-Trump “resistance”, has its own problems both irresistible and intractable – mounting public pension debt, underfunded schools, and a revenue stream too dependent upon capital gains. David Crane, a Stanford lecturer, past economic aide to Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and co-founder of Govern for California, weighs the health of the state so […]

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I saw a couple of things this past weekend that concern me about where we are headed: A “Rocket Mortgage” commercial, promoting approval for a mortgage in seconds/just a few clicks! Articles about a new “Amazon store”, where the customer basically walks in, takes what they want, and their Amazon account is charged. Here’s my […]

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On this episode of Viewpoint, AEI’s Katharine Stevens sits down with photographer Chris Arnade. Arnade has a PhD in physics and was a Wall Street trader. After a crisis of conscience following the 2008 financial crash [3:02], Chris abandoned his banking job to travel the country and chronicle the lives of America’s forgotten masses. But […]

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Dear Fellow Conservatives: I love conservatism for its informed, logical view of the world. Yet when it comes to public education, I am dismayed at the tenor of the conservative conversation. Because conservatives maintain principled opposition to federally funded education for all, they frequently over-generalize, speak dismissively, and dispense unwarranted criticism about institutions and practices […]

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Max Eden joins Seth Barron to discuss student discipline and suspension policies, and how discipline “reform” has led to chaos in many classrooms. In January 2014, in an attempt to reduce out-of-school suspensions, an Obama administration directive forced thousands of American schools to change their discipline policies. Proponents of the new discipline rules say that teachers and school administrators have been racially discriminatory in […]

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What is Alabama football? What does the leadership of Bear Bryant and Nick Saban have in common? Focus on discipline and execution.  More

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In Banter’s seventh installment of the “Bridging the Dignity Divide” series, AEI Morgridge Fellow in Education Studies Andy Smarick joins the show to discuss the unique challenges and opportunities facing rural education in America. In addition to his role at AEI, Smarick also serves as president of the Maryland State Board of Education. With AEI […]

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Quote of the Day: Education and Barbarism

 

“Each new generation born is in effect an invasion of civilization by little barbarians, who must be civilized before it is too late.” – Thomas Sowell

I have to admit, there are times I wonder if it is now too late. The Weather Underground tried to break the United States through violent means in the 1960s and 1970s. They failed miserably. But they chose to infiltrate the education system and seem to have raised a bumper crop of little barbarians. We are going through our own Cultural Revolution led by spoiled children in adult bodies.

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Bill explains why he thinks Pres. Trump’s first year has been one of the most consequential years of a presidency in modern history. Then, he dissects Pres. Trump’s new national security strategy with Brian Kennedy, president of the American Strategy Group. Next, Bill reviews the highs and lows of American education in 2017 with education […]

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What History Will They Read, If Any?

 

As I sit here pouring over an account of Elihu Washburne — the onetime friend and confidant of Presidents Lincoln and Grant, and ambassador to France during a time of tremendous tumult and drama in the streets of Paris — I find myself marveling at how unaware we are of what is an undeniably riveting story of American honor and personal sacrifice, embodied in the valiant actions of a dutiful public servant in a hotbed of chaos and disorder.

If I had ever even heard of Elihu Washburne in my youth, I have long since forgotten it. Yet here I am in my mid-40s, and had I not encountered the story in the chapters of David McCullough’s The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris and my current reading of Michael Hill’s biography of Mr. Washburne (taken much from the latter’s own diary and dispatches during the Parisian tumult of the 1870’s), I would still know nothing of this remarkable piece of American history.

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On this episode of the AEI Events Podcast, AEI’s Katharine B. Stevens hosts a discussion with retired military leaders from Mission: Readiness about how high-quality early childhood programs can help prepare more children for success in school and in life, including in the military for those who choose to serve. Current and retired military leaders […]

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Why Study Novels in English Class?

 

When we love literature, and reading comes easily to us, we tend to assume that the purpose for studying novels is self-evident. We’d be missing out on the romance of Jane Eyre, the brilliance of Achebe, and the wit of Twain. Besides, how could one object to reading stories as a required activity for school? We may as well get credit for eating cookies or binge-watching our favorite shows.

But not all students are eager to crack open that musty Gothic work, especially when there are friends to text and movies to watch at the touch of a screen. Besides, some students find reading to be laborious, a limitation that isn’t necessarily their fault. Because reluctant readers tend to be the exception and not the rule, English teachers need to establish a clear case for the benefits of novel reading. (They should also provide tools to help students get the most out of what they read, but that’s a different discussion.) At the beginning of the school year, all students should understand the “why” of literature:

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For many residents of Pennsylvania, and anyone interested in tax policies and how public schools are run, the result of a November 7th referendum vote on a PA Constitutional Amendment Question resulted in what I believe is good news. Pennsylvania is joining other states in trying to get a handle on escalating property taxes, with […]

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The Proletariat Is Getting Counter-Revolutionary

 

This piece in the Atlantic is a very good read. Reed College, in Portland, OR, has endured 13 months of outrage over Humanities 110, the college’s signature humanities course. In the course, students are trained to engage in critical reading of various ancient works from the perspective of different disciplines. A group of snowflakes formed themselves into “Reedies against Racism” in response to a call to protest police violence against blacks. Of the list of demands, one was reforming Hum 110.

But for RAR, Hum 110 is all about oppression. “We believe that the first lesson that freshmen should learn about Hum 110 is that it perpetuates white supremacy—by centering ‘whiteness’ as the only required class at Reed,” according to a RAR statement delivered to all new freshmen. The texts that make up the Hum 110 syllabus—from the ancient Mediterranean, Mesopotamia, Persia, and Egypt regions—are “Eurocentric,” “Caucasoid,” and thus “oppressive,” RAR leaders have stated. Hum 110 “feels like a cruel test for students of color,” one leader remarked on public radio. “It traumatized my peers.”

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In Defense of Men

 

This morning I read an excellent article by DC McAllister in The Federalist and came away with a feeling of despair. I appreciated what she wrote, but I felt there was even more to say about the abyss that has deepened between men and women as the result of the latest onslaught of accusations by women against men.

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My Body, My Life, My Death, My Choice: Mine!

 

Perpetuating Moral Childhood and the Decline of the West

The West is losing its religion, and, perhaps, there’s no greater indication of it than the clamor for “my rights!”

“My right” to off my offspring.

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Frustrations of a Homeschooling Dad

 

Here is something I wrote for our local homeschooler’s support group newsletter about 20 years ago. It may be too dated but I think it expresses the frustration a Dad can have when he tries too hard to be relevant in the Home School Environment.

It’s Time

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