Tag: Education

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Like Claire, I also noticed yesterday on the Silent Members thread that we seem to have a large number of homeschoolers on Ricochet. I am always on the lookout for new curriculum and ideas to incorporate into our homeschooling routine. Anyway, this is our second year of our second round of homeschooling (taught the older […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Virtual Education

 

Imagine “walking” through the Louvre or Vatican City, exploring every nook and being able to examine every aspect in detail. The next day, you might explore the ruins of Vietnam or even the now-destroyed ancient monuments of Iraq and Syria. Or look all around you at the copious sea life of the Great Barrier Reef without need of SCUBA gear.

Since this video is produced by a video game publisher (and development software leader), it references games. But the future of Virtual Reality, if this truly does get off the ground at last, isn’t just gaming.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Killing History

 

Patrick HenryI have but one lamp by which my feet are guided; and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging of the future but by the past. — Patrick Henry, 1775

Nearly twenty years ago, Australian historian Keith Windschuttle wrote a scathing indictment of contemporary historiography. He attacked the prevailing post-modern analysis as little more than “Parisian labels and designer concepts.” The book, Killing History, established the basic argument against history written in a way that was divorced from empirical evidence and a sense of universal standards.

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In California it is possible to become a lawyer without going to law school. There is a program that is sometimes referred to as “reading the law” or “law office study program” (LOSP). Details are available on the State Bar of California website. While doing some online research about this program, I came across a […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Washington State Constitutional Crisis

 

imageA few months back, I wrote about the crazy battle between Washington State’s supreme court and state legislature over education funding. The short version of the story is that the state constitution imposes the “paramount” duty on the legislature “to make ample provision for the education of all children.” The state has been sued repeatedly over a supposed failure to live up to this duty, and the court has sided against the legislature, demanding it square itself away. Last September, the legislature was found in contempt of the court. Now that the legislative session has ended, the court has evaluated their work and found it wanting:

After the close of the session and following several special sessions, the State has offered no plan for achieving full constitutional compliance by the deadline the legislature itself adopted. Accordingly, this court must take immediate action to enforce its order. Effective today, the court imposes a $100,000 per day penalty on the State for each day it remains in violation of this court’s order…this penalty may be abated in part if a special session is called and results in full compliance.

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Below I have outlined a vision for a year-long unit to use in one of my courses. Can you awesome, visionary idea people think of ways to make it better? Can you put them in the comments? Don’t worry about all the things I, the teacher, must worry about. I’ll take care of those myself. You […]

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Interesting point from Canada’s Institute of Marriage and Family: About 88 percent of Canadian teens say they expect to marry someday. This is a good thing since there is ample evidence that marriage remains the gold standard for family formation, offering benefits to adults and children alike. More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Hello, all, here’s the first of a long series of podcasts on poetry. You know me. My Virgil here is Mr. Ashok Karra–here’s where he writes–& we are talking about a poem today. Next, soon, will come a discussion of the Pound piece, The study in aesthetics, which Midge was so gracious to send to […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. In School, C is the new D

 

d-minus-grade The debasement of American education system continues:

The solution, Simmons suggests, is to eliminate Ds altogether, because he believes many of those barely getting by will up their game to avoid failure. He pointed to a New Jersey charter school that’s already made the transition. […] “Ds are simply not useful in society,” Larrie Reynolds, superintendent at the Mount Olive, N.J. charter school Simmons referenced, told the New York Times in 2010. “It’s a throwaway grade. No one wants to hire a D-anything, so why would we have D-students and give them credit for it?”

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Hello all,  I recently posted on my current lament over becoming a teacher and upon some reflection and reading, I believe that is due in large part to my not having a project or goal that really motivates me and that some of the content I have to teach has become stale. To that end, […]

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According to an article in The Atlantic: Once financial concerns have been covered by their parents, children have more latitude to study less pragmatic things in school. Kim Weeden, a sociologist at Cornell, looked at National Center for Education Statistics data for me after I asked her about this phenomenon, and her analysis revealed that, […]

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As I begin to bask in the glow (and the boredom) that is summer vacation, I find myself once again at a crossroads. I have little to no desire to go back the classroom this fall. By all accounts, I am fairly good at my job both in terms of student reviews, administrator observations, and […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

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With apologies to Claire, I’m turning her challenge inside-out. Not because I don’t have five or ten or twenty things to share — oh, do I ever! — but because, frankly, I’m curious. Hopefully, at the beginning of the year, your teacher gives you a chance to share anything you think she ought to know. You learn […]

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But now that I have your attention, let’s talk about education. God has just spoken to you, as unto Solomon. God will grant you one request for fixing the nation’s education system. Which of these do you choose? More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Secretly Rational

 

shutterstock_230756299Like many who aren’t born fashionistas, I found myself needing advice on how to not dress like a schlub (or in my case, schlubbette). Trolling the interwebs several years ago, I ran across GoFugYourself.com, a website devoted to demonstrating that making others’ eyes bleed with your attire is not the unique domain of the fat and poor, but that Hollywood’s richest and fittest can do it, too. It gave great lessons in what not to do. But the Fug Girls also have a category for fashion explosions so spectacular that they transcend all ugliness to create their own kind of beauty: “secretly awesome!”. This, along with Bernie Sanders’s recent meditation on deodorant – got me thinking about all those activities in life that are secretly rational. Meaning, they look irrational to outsiders, but from the perspective of the one doing the activity, they are at least as rational as, say a tree is when “deciding” where to put its leaves:

For example, consider the trendy idea of The Framing Effect – the observation that people respond differently to the same situation if it’s simply framed differently. In The Why Axis, a spirited journey into the exciting realm of economic fieldwork, authors Gneezy and List experimentally verified that giving children money before an exam, then taking it away if they score badly, improves exam scores more than promising them money if they score well.* They call this an example of loss-framing, and framing is supposed to be a “cognitive bias” – one of those things humans do that’s not quite rational. But as any child might know – and as researchers discovered when they revisited the marshmallow test – a reward promised at some point in the future really is worth less than the same reward now, because there’s less chance you’ll actually receive it. These children aren’t responding differently to the same situation depending on how it’s framed: they’re responding to genuinely different situations. And quite rationally, too! – especially considering these particular children’s impoverished, chaotic environment, where adult inability to make good on promises to children may be quite common.

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1. “It’s Bailey’s birthday today, and her mom’s bringing in cupcakes at two thirty.” 2. From a five-year-old: “There are three Jordans in this class.”  More

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Just close your eyes and it will go away. Canada legalized same-sex “marriage” in 2005 [….] More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. From Doolittle to Big Daddy

 

There were two things this week, a tweet that dropped my jaw and a column about an old movie I have always loved, that somehow connected for me.

Julie_Andrews_Rex_Harrison_My_Fair_LadyThe movie is My Fair Lady, the Hollywood version of Pygmalion, in which Eliza Doolittle get Professor Higgins to teach her proper (Queen’s) English so that she can be “a lady in a flow’r shop, ’stead of sellin’ at the corner of Tottenham Court Road.” William McGurn observes the assumptions of Ms Doolittle’s request and study of language:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Is the US Economy Immoral?

 

shutterstock_259200614When Democrat Jerry Brown ran a long shot presidential campaign back in 1992, he snarkily referred to Bill and Hillary Clinton as “Bonnie and Clyde,” the Depression-era bank robbers. Brown, now the governor of California, thought he had a legitimate chance to win the nomination. He wasn’t going to let some delicate notion of political etiquette stand in his way.

Don’t expect that kind of tough talk from Bernie Sanders, another longshot Democratic presidential candidate challenging a Clinton. During his announcement Tuesday, all the socialist Vermont senator had to say about Hillary Clinton was that his campaign “is not about Hillary Clinton.”

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