Tag: Education

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Roger Ascham, the teacher to Queen Elizabeth, about 1565, in discussing this question, wrote: “And it is pity that commonly more care is had, yea and that among very wise men, to find out rather a cunning man for their horse than a cunning man for their children. They say nay in word, but they […]

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California Recall

 

Last Wednesday, June 23, 2021, the California Secretary of State Shirley Weber announced that the recall petition against Governor Newsom had the requisite number of valid signatures and was thus certified. This sets the stage for a recall election within the next six months. For those unaware of California recall procedures, the recall election will involve two questions on the same ballot, first, should the governor be recalled, yes or no, and the second vote for one candidate from a list of candidates to replace the governor. If 50% plus one vote to recall the governor, then the candidate who receives the most votes on the second question will be the new governor; otherwise, Governor Newsom will remain governor until the end of his term.

I live in California and will vote to recall Newsom. As to the second question, who to replace him with, that remains an open question. However, the candidate most likely to get my vote will need to espouse conservative principles (hopefully with a record to back up those principles) and I hope will take positions like the following;

A Boarding School Education, Part I: Hard Choices

 

After I was excused from lunch one afternoon at boarding school, I stood out in the side yard whacking at the tether ball, trying to  give it enough momentum to whip around the pole a few times.  Solitude was time for a nine-year-old to do some thinking, and on my mind was this: What if I had been born somewhere else, like in the States? And just grew up ordinary, went to a regular school, didn’t get to travel and stuff?  How boring would that be?  I’m sure glad I’m me.

Boarding school is a controversial topic on the missionary kid (MK) Facebook group I’ve joined. One’s experience really depended on individual circumstances: how your parents handled challenges, who your dorm parents were, how old you were, how far away from family, and so on. MK’s often express that their years in boarding school were painful ones, that they were too young, felt misunderstood, and shaped by approaches to discipline that were often harsh.  For me, in spite of some difficult semesters, the three years I spent at school were overall positive ones. They developed my mind in both expected and unlooked-for ways, providing exposure to American culture, time with peers, classroom experiences, and a long list of enrichments that included music and swimming lessons.

Ayaan speaks with Christopher Rufo about his first encounter with critical race theory (CRT), why it is so dangerous, and what is really going on in American schools. They also discuss Christopher’s experience as a documentary film maker, homelessness in San Francisco, and the decline of cities in America.

Christopher Rufo is a senior fellow and director of the initiative on critical race theory at the Manhattan Institute. He is also a contributing editor at City Journal where his writing explores a range of issues including critical race theory, homelessness, addiction, crime, and the decline of cities on America’s west coast.

The Platinum Rule

 

The Golden Rule, “Whoever has the gold makes the rule,” has turned into the Platinum Rule: “He who has the government’s American Excess Platinum Card makes the rules.” Because state politicians lack the power to spend significantly in excess of annual revenues, thanks to state constitutional balanced budget provisions, they turn to Uncle Sugar. The first taste may be free, but then come the demands. This bipartisan political dynamic has pernicious effects on the constitutional balance between states and the federal government. nationalizing much of our policy, right down to local government and so right down to where you live.

But wait, we hear all the time about states in debt, what is this state constitutional limit talk?

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President Trump spoke at the North Carolina GOP convention dinner on June 5, 2021. His platforms do a poor job of generating transcripts, but Rev.com is on the job. Additionally, a local CBS affiliate got the raw video, in two parts. President Trump introduced and endorsed Republican members of Congress, the lieutenant governor, and a […]

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QotD – Freedom

 

Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same.

– Ronald Reagan

Mr. Darwin Can’t Get a Break

 

It can’t be easy to be Charles Darwin right now. (I mean, for reasons beyond the obvious.) A meticulous researcher and a serious and deeply respectful man, Mr. Darwin spent years carefully documenting and refining his seminal* theory of evolution through natural selection, delaying its presentation until similar discoveries by fellow British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace prompted him to go public and secure his claim as the father of evolutionary theory.

(And what is it with our British cousins, that they should produce simultaneously two men of such insight?)

From ‘No Child Left Behind’ to ‘No Child Gets Ahead’

 

A slippery slope no longer, our public schools are in a disastrous tumble. Every time we think it cannot get worse, it does.

With disbelief, I saw recent headlines about the public schools in Virginia potentially delaying advanced courses in mathematics until the eleventh grade. Headlines give false pictures, so I read on, hoping to find a shred of redemption in the story.

No Fate: Ohio

 

Ohio need not go the way of Minnesota. Republicans and Trump voters, the forgotten Americans, have it in their power under Ohio’s state constitution to smash the Marxist BLM and Critical Race Theory lies. Fortune will favor the bold in Ohio who take up President Trump’s torch for the forgotten Americans of our inner cities. Someone must champion the African Americans who are being shoved back into dependency and constant physical danger by Democrats, with Congressional RepubliCAN’T complicity. John Hinderaker did us a valuable service by summarizing the latest encounter between police and a black criminal who expected to defy lawful interference in her life-threatening armed assault on two African American girls. However, his gloomy prognostication about “the latest anti-police fraud” need not come to pass:

We all know where this is going. The would-be murderer Ma’Khia Bryant will be lionized with fulsome tributes. Her relatives will become multi-millionaires. The intended victim may side with her would-be murderer; there is plenty of money to go around.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome Arizona Democratic Sen.  Mark Kelly opposing expansion of the U.S. Supreme Court under any circumstances. They also wince as Virginia announces there will be no accelerated high school math classes until the 11th grade. And they have very different reactions to the news that Caitlyn Jenner is running for governor in California.

 

Angel Eduardo is a writer, musician, photographer and artist. He and Bridget discuss the discipline of being a professional artist, the moral panic around art these days, self-censorship and the fear of being cancelled, victimhood culture, exercise & discipline, Bridget’s ideal super power, why mistakes are like wrapping paper, what to do when you’re lost, and the ground we’re losing in the equality movement. Angel explains his concept of “star-manning,” a way of engaging in discourse with each other that acknowledges a person’s point of view and their intentions in a conversation as a means of finding common ground, making them feel heard, and making them more likely to listen to you in return. He believes that most people mean well, and we often lose sight of that fact and depersonalize them in a disagreement, particularly over social media. Learn more about Angel on his website, angeleduardo.com.

Joe Selvaggi discusses a recently released survey from Pioneer Institute and Emerson Polling, “Massachusetts Residents’ Perceptions of K-12 Education During the Covid-19 Pandemic,” with Emerson’s lead analyst, Isabel Holloway, and Pioneer Institute’s Charlie Chieppo. Read the poll here.

Guests:

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Jay Mathews, an education columnist for The Washington Post and author of the recent book, An Optimist’s Guide to American Public Education. Jay describes the three key trends in K-12 schooling that he views as cause for hope. They also discuss the tensions between high-profile, college prep-centered school reformers and the dominant pedagogical outlook found across many of the major schools of education. They explore teacher-driven school reforms, whether led by legendary figures such as Jaime Escalante in traditional public schools, or in charter networks such as KIPP, which have established high-caliber teacher preparation programs. Drawing on his decades spent covering K-12 education for The Washington Post, he shares observations about the quality and success of the U.S. Department of Education’s policymaking, and the strengths and weaknesses of federal education efforts in contrast to what he has observed in states, districts, and schools. They also talk about the most effective ways to spend the massive infusion of federal money school districts are receiving through COVID relief. Next, he offers insights on American journalism, print media’s struggles to adapt to a digital world, the impact on K-12 education coverage, and suggestions for improvement. As someone whose education background and early career focused on Asia, he offers thoughts on U.S.-China relations and the wider implications for America’s global competitiveness in K-12 school reform. He concludes with a reading from his new book.

Stories of the Week: Are unnecessarily severe middle school discipline policies and practices that disproportionately target students of color exacerbating the school-to-prison pipeline? Writing in The Wall Street JournalEducation Next‘s Ira Stoll explores the debate in Boston about changing admissions policies at exam schools, and whether outside organizations, such as the Red Sox baseball team, should weigh in on the issue.

Parenting Postscript: Our Best and Worst Decisions

 

In 1994, my dad introduced me to a friend of his and mentioned that I was engaged. My dad’s friend, with humor and kindness, told me, “Ah, yes. Marriage.  There’s nothing like marriage to show you who you really are.  Smokes you right out.”  All these years, I’ve  retained the image of a small frenzied mammal running back and forth in his tunnel until he finally pops out of his back door–heaving, exposed, and vulnerable–to gulp the fresh air.  Except in my case, it was not marriage, but parenthood that really smoked me out.

Christian blogger and author Tim Challies expressed it best when he described some challenges of being a parent as “muddling through.”  Yes–we can read all the books, survey parents we admire, attend Love and Logic conferences, determine to be kinder and gentler, ask for help on Facebook.  Yet, few children arrive as a neat, predictable package.  Each comes as a unique little creature, a complete person, yet pre-loaded with potential to be nurtured and developed over years.

The Best of YouTube

 

I know — I should ditch YouTube because it’s anathema to those fighting to preserve what’s left of free speech. I ditched Facebook for this very reason and experienced an inner peace I’d been lacking since Skynet became self-aware. But I still use YouTube all the time for two main reasons:

  1. Unlike Facebook, a good alternative fails to exist. Rumble just doesn’t cut it yet.
  2. Most of the good guys’ channels are still up and dishing it, despite YouTube’s best efforts to silence them.

I have plenty of channels I subscribe to, almost all of which have nothing to do with politics. I subscribe to several ministries (Todd WhiteDutch SheetsFlashpointmy church), a bunch of movie and film channels, channels with nerd stuff, and a couple of NFL ones. They show up on my feed and I watch them in the quiet hour after the kids are finally in bed, or at three in the morning while trying to get the toddler back into his bed. If you’re looking for a soothing balm to mitigate the news of the latest atrocity against our country, or just want a break to kill the time in a waiting room somewhere, here are my latest favorites. (Note: unless noted, these are not always appropriate for kids.)

Rousseau

Member Post

 

Seemingly overnight, a large segment of America has gone insane. We’re not talking about the culture of paranoia and safety that has metastasized in the wake of COVID-19 hysteria. We’re talking about the ideological shift, particularly on cultural issues, that has occurred since the start of the Obama Administration. To pick an easy example, it would […]

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If Math Is White Supremacy, Civilization Is Finished

 

Two plus two equals four. No controversy there, right? Because in this universe, which happens to be governed by immutable laws of physics, which are expressed through unalterable mathematics, two plus two must always equal four, there’s only one right answer. And no one could possibly quibble with that, right?

Wrong! Reality-denying leftists insist that two plus two is deviously misleading and adds up to a whole lot more than four, if it even adds up to that. It’s all part of the larger equation of – and you know what’s coming – the dastardly, ubiquitous, never-ending, all-encompassing . . . drum roll, please . . . white supremacy!

School Diary: How to Anger a Budding SJW

 
A small eruption of social justice warfare erupted today at the start of class. Thoughts, critiques, suggestions, etc…all warmly welcomed.My class was waiting to begin when a chatty Hispanic student- call her K- said: “well, I read this article in the Washington Post…but I shouldn’t talk about it now…”

K has been my student for a year and a half so I should have known better than to take the bait. Most of her tuition is paid by a fund that sends “promising” students from public schools to independent/private schools in the state. We know this because she speaks about it constantly, to everyone. She’s generally cheerful, inarticulate, and uninformed (“Ok, so this Helen Keller person… I don’t really know who she was, but anyhoo, so… my sister said that she was blind and deaf. And she couldn’t talk either? But how… like I don’t wanna be mean or, like….well mean I guess but I mean how is that possible? Like at the same time?”)