Tag: Education

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

From Andrea Widburg, American Thinker: The San Francisco Unified School District is using the Wuhan virus as an excuse to finish destroying what was once one of the best public high schools in the country. Those who object have gotten a snootful of Critical Race Theory (CRT) for daring to believe in academic excellence. Preview […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Revoke the Pulitzer Prize for the 1619 Project: Too Little, Too Late?

 

I felt vindicated for my early attacks on the 1619 Project when I learned that the National Association of Scholars signed a letter that directed the Pulitzer Prize Board to revoke its award of the Prize to The 1619 Project. But my appreciation of the news was short-lived.

The NAS acted nobly in criticizing the 1619 Project. As they said in their letter to the Board:

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Hybrid Teaching Hell: From the Trenches

 

Back in August I wrote a post about my first day back to school, “Why Teachers Think About Quitting“. It feels like it’s been years since I wrote it and it seemed like an appropriate moment to step back and take stock of how things have developed since then in this bizarre “hybrid” teaching world. Some of the issues I mentioned in my post from the first day have been resolved in practical terms- but there are other issues that deserve some attention.

Students

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Over 200 rare and very valuable books that were stolen over three years ago, were recovered under a floor at a Romanian house in recent days. Some of these books included first editions by Sir Issac Newton and Galileo. They were stolen from a postal transit warehouse in West London en-route to a Las Vegas […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they get a kick out of New York Democrat Rep. Max Rose posting a six-second ad just to bash deeply unpopular Mayor Bill de Blasio and hope it means Rep. Rose is feeling nervous. They also wade into the supposedly explosive revelations about President Trump’s coronavirus approach in Bob Woodward’s new book. And they fume as our tax dollars help pay for an event calling for an end to capitalism and even the United States itself.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and guest co-host Kerry McDonald are joined by Michelle Rhee, founder and former CEO of StudentsFirst and prior to that, former chancellor of the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS). Michelle shares how her liberal arts background and Teach for America experience prepared her for a career in education leadership. Michelle reflects on the reforms she initiated at DCPS, the challenges she faced navigating notoriously difficult D.C. politics, and the rewards of working with her successor, Kaya Henderson, to implement lasting reforms and deliver great results for kids. She offers recommendations for restructuring K-12 schools, especially in larger, urban districts. They also discuss the ways in which schools and districts are being radically decentralized during COVID-19, with virtual schooling, homeschooling, and pandemic pods.

Stories of the Week: Through pandemic pods, parents without a lot of financial resources or home space are getting creative to set up meaningful learning environments across the country. A study on school responses to COVID-19 that appeared in EducationNext shows that leading charter school networks shifted seamlessly to remote learning, within days of the mid-March shutdowns. How did they succeed, and is it replicable?

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Why Teachers Think About Quitting

 

Yesterday was the first day of school and I thought about quitting for most of it. Mostly I’m just relieved it’s Saturday today.

I work at a small independent Catholic school. Our admin decided that we would reopen for in-person instruction (which is clearly preferable to remote for all the obvious reasons), but offer a remote option to students who preferred to stay home — “hybrid” instruction. Leave it to admin to give it a name that makes it sound like it’s a perfected model. Herein lies the problem. Our school’s remote experience last spring worked pretty well mostly because everyone was remote at the same time so there was no balancing act required, at least for school.

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“He alone, who owns the youth, gains the future.” Preview Open

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Marxist agitators and leaders are stepping forward and owning up to who they are. But they have been quietly in the shadows among us for a long time. I was disturbed to learn the degree to which they literally have taken over our education system. They have made such overwhelming inroads that it’s questionable whether […]

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The latest COVID-19 data out of Sweden suggests that not only is the country approaching zero deaths on a daily basis, they are also approaching zero new cases. Has Sweden reached herd immunity, and if so, how long until we do so here in the U.S.?

Avik Roy of the Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity and Scott Immergut of Ricochet discuss this topic and more—including new orders on school reopenings in Texas and whether we should delay the presidential election due to COVID—on today’s episode of COVID in 19.

Join host Joe Selvaggi and co-host Rebekah Paxton of Pioneer Institute as they talk with Harvard Medical School Professor Benjamin Sommers on the most current scientific observations regarding the health and safety of reopening schools. The episode looks at the risks to students, teachers, administrators, and the public at large from the novel coronavirus, and offers ideas for optimizing outcomes in the fall.

Dr. Benjamin Sommers is a practicing primary care internist, and he is also Professor of Medicine at Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. From 2011-2012, he served as a Senior Advisor in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and he served part-time in an advisory role from 2013-2015. His current research projects focus on barriers to health care access among low-income adults, insurance markets, and the health and economic effects of state Medicaid policies. He received a PhD in Health Policy from Harvard and an MD from Harvard Medical School.

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I stood looking down at a pair of new Mary Jane’s, black with yellow linings. My sister and I were to go to Thai school, now that we had moved to town from the village, and we were both to be enrolled in Kindergarten 2. The first thing my mother saw to was our uniforms: […]

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Economist Donald J. Boudreaux joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the long-lasting economic impact of the government shutdown. Boudreaux is a Professor of Economics at George Washington University, and serves as a Senior Fellow at the Mercatus Center and The Fund for American Studies.

Boudreaux wrote an article earlier this week titled “Who is Making Decisions About Our Lives?” in which he outlined the limited knowledge American leaders have. The American people also don’t understand, he argued, the government’s decision to have the Federal Reserve print money doesn’t create actual wealth in the form of any goods and services.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. How Have You Been Changed by 2020?

 

I realize that we are only halfway through 2020, but there has been so much disruption and confusion, it seems as if six years have passed. So, I think it’s worthwhile to see if and how we are in the process of reassessing our attitudes and beliefs following this chaotic time. First, I’m curious about the impact of the Leftist disruption and violence on you. Second, COVID-19 has had an impact with the demands made on citizens, from lockdowns to masks. I’ll share some of my own thinking and I hope it will inspire you to share yours.

Regarding the civil unrest, I am far less optimistic than I once was regarding the ability and even interest in this country to “set things right.” I once thought almost everyone believed in the rule of law; I don’t know if that’s true anymore. I also thought that in spite of the incursions of Marxist thought into our public schools, I could imagine that damage being turned around at some point; I don’t know if that’s possible anymore. I have also committed to concealed carry; a year ago, I would not have considered that possibility, and to some degree I resent feeling the need to do it now.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Trump Speed

 

President Trump and his administration are running at “Trump speed.” This Friday, as the Supremes ending their annual tour, with a finale on tax records that is no Beatles hit, the White House thanked the court in passing. The administration also found time to court Hispanic American voters, all families with school-age children, veterans, and women in need, while backing the blue.

Statement from the Press Secretary
LAW & JUSTICE Issued on: July 9, 2020

What better way to celebrate our country’s independence than by getting your first gun? Teri did just that — and she thinks her Sig Sauer is pretty cool. And Stacy is looking to break her family out of New Jersey for a vacation at an undisclosed location.

Also, Teri’s tweet goes viral, Bush 43 alumni go all in for Biden and schools are going to screw everything up this Fall.

The time for doing nothing is far behind us. On this week’s show, Teri and Stacy talk about the need for the right to fight back. Teri goes on a rant about the local high school changing its mascot and why the school doesn’t deserve her kids. The ladies also take on Karen Attiah, the WaPo editor whose tweet got Stacy steaming mad. And, finally, tips on shedding the ‘rona weight we’ve all put on.

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This week, in a special segment of “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are honored to be joined by Kendra Espinoza, lead plaintiff in the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, just decided yesterday, Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, and Erica Smith, an attorney with the Institute for Justice, which represented the plaintiffs. Kendra shares what motivated her and her daughters, Naomi and Sarah, to take such a courageous stand for school choice and religious liberty, and describes her experience being the lead plaintiff in a high-profile Supreme Court case. She also discusses the other Montana moms involved in the case, their reaction to the successful outcome, and the realization of the impact it will have on so many families across the country. Erica shares her thoughts on the decision’s wide-ranging constitutional implications; some surprising aspects of the decision that may prompt future legal battles; and a preview of a state-by-state analysis on which states are best positioned to expand access to school choice now.

Story of the Week: Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the plaintiffs in the Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue case, involving Montana parents who were denied access to a state tax credit program when they sought to use it to send their children to religious schools. The Court held that Montana’s Blaine Amendment cannot be used to exclude religious school parents from the state education tax credit program. In the majority opinion, Chief Justice Roberts wrote: “A State need not subsidize private education. But once a State decides to do so, it cannot disqualify some private schools solely because they are religious.”

Join Charlotte as she discusses how we can all help non-profits that are helping people who have been hurt by the coronavirus.

Learn all about how Memorial Day started and why it’s so important to celebrate those who have given their lives defending our freedom.