Tag: Donald Trump

On this episode of “The Federalist Radio Hour,” Federalist Western Correspondent Tristan Justice joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to break down the second impeachment trial for former President Donald Trump and how it compares to the Democrats’ first attempt to impeach and remove him just one year ago.

The Politics of Impeachment: Watching High Stakes Poker

 

Normal Americans not consumed with politics may understandably be confused about what’s happening with the impeachment of now-former President Donald Trump. Allow me to share with you the political machinations likely driving what is, or is not, transpiring.

First, the January 6th breach of the Capitol by a hundred or so extremists opened a political opportunity for Democrats – not just to blame President Trump for “inciting” violence, but to drive a wedge between establishment Republicans and Trump supporters. They rightly figured that House and Senate Republicans, among others, would recoil at the violence and damage done to the Capitol.

They were correct. And they responded with a hurried, even “emergency” impeachment of President Trump. No hearings, no investigation, no Judiciary Committee vote, no due process of any kind. And it passed on a largely party-line vote, with 10 Republicans joining in. Establishment Republicans, including reputed New York Times “conservative” columnist Bret Stephens, praised House Conference Lynn Cheney and 9 of her colleagues for their “courage.”

The new Biden administration says it must act quickly, with a flurry of executive orders, because the nation is experiencing not one, not two, not three, but four crises.

“We face four overlapping and compounding crises,” said new chief of staff Ron Klain. “The COVID-19 crisis, the resulting economic crisis, the climate crisis, and a racial equity crisis.”

Fourteen days after the riots at the U.S. Capitol, Joe Biden took the oath of office on the same grounds that became a scene of mayhem and violence, including the deaths of five people.

Jay and Seth discuss the inauguration, what it means in U.S. political culture and the work that will come next for Biden and members of Congress. They also discuss the press’s role and how they have a reputation to live up to despite the friendlier confines of a Democratic administration.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Seattle talk show host Jason Rantz joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky and Senior Editor Chris Bedford to discuss outgoing President Donald Trump, incoming President Joe Biden, and how American institutions will handle the transition.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Independent Women’s Forum Senior Policy Analyst Inez Feltscher Stepman joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to reflect on Donald Trump’s presidency and how the institutional distrust he harnessed can be traced back to the Tea Party.

The Trial That Should Not Be

 

Last week, the House of Representatives voted to impeach Donald Trump for “incitement of insurrection,” stemming chiefly from his remarks before a large crowd near the White House on January 6. As I have previously written, serious questions still remain as to whether those charges are valid as a matter of fact and law. But assuming they are, the question is what comes next.

Press coverage is mostly limited to tactical and political issues. On the Democratic side, the chief concerns are the timing and form of the expected trial. Should Speaker Nancy Pelosi delay sending the article of impeachment to the Senate to give House leaders more time to gather evidence to strengthen their case? Or will that delay undercut the perceived public urgency of the trial? If there is an impeachment trial, will that slow down the Senate confirmations of top cabinet officials or the passage of Joe Biden’s legislative agenda? On the Republican side, the question arises of whether individual senators should break ranks with Trump and convict him, even if most Republican voters are as strongly opposed to conviction as Democratic voters are in favor of it.

In an important sense, these questions put the cart before the horse. First, we must ask whether the Senate even has the power to try this impeachment once the president is out of office. As a textual matter, the answer is no. There are two relevant provisions in the Constitution: Article I, Section 3, and Article II, Section 4. Article I, Section 3, gives the sole power of impeachment to the Senate. First, a simple declarative sentence provides that “When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside.” The key word is “the” as in “the President.” The word “the” is used instead of the word “a.” “The” has a definite reference to the president now sitting in office, which will be Joe Biden on January 20. Once Donald Trump is out of office, he cannot be tried under this provision.

Join Jim and Greg as they expose the insanity of Tennessee Rep. Steve Cohen, who says the National Guard could be a threat to Biden since many of them probably voted for Trump. They also pummel Joe Biden for yet another nomination based solely on identity politics rather than competence. And they also condemn Biden for planning to kill the Keystone XL Pipeline, despite many good reasons for the project to continue.

Member Post

 

Donald Trump is many things, but a conservative is not one of them. He did, however, demonstrate that a light regulatory touch and competitive tax rates can unleash the animal spirits and grow the economy. He might not have achieved a sustained 3% growth in GDP, but his policies did improve employment and income for […]

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Jack interviews Andrew Egger and Audrey Fahlberg, two writers for The Dispatch who witnessed the chaos at Capitol Hill last Wednesday firsthand, to get a full account of what happened.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Federalist Senior Editor Chris Bedford and Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky discuss the Senate’s upcoming impeachment trial and what it means for the future of the GOP.

Silicon Valley vs. Free Speech

 

Suddenly, free speech is in serious trouble.

Six years ago, CEO Jack Dorsey could proclaim “Twitter stands for freedom of expression. We stand for speaking truth to power.“ Last week, Dorsey and other big tech titans unleashed a massive speech suppression initiative, based on the notion that not only President Trump, but also anyone who supported him, including conservatives and Republicans en masse, must be silenced in the interest of public safety.

The silencing was comprehensive and ruthless. Recently increased censorship in social media had all been directed to the right. Then Facebook and Twitter joined in a permanent ban of the president. It was necessary to silence the President of the United States, according to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, because his claims of voter fraud were false and it would be dangerous to allow him to keep making them.

So Much for Impeachment: McConnell Won’t Reconvene Senate

 

When Nancy Pelosi moved forward on impeachment Monday, I said it was likely all for show rather than for removing President Trump from office. This just in — it was all for show.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s (R-Ky.) office told Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer’s (D-N.Y.) staff on Wednesday that the GOP will not agree to reconvene the Senate before Jan. 19 to allow an impeachment trial while President Trump is still in office.

Gene Marks, President of the Marks Group PC and writer for outlets like The Guardian and The Hill, joins Carol Roth to discuss the state of small business coming out of 2020 into 2021. Gene and Carol break down Trump’s business legacy and what might be in store in the new administration. Plus, some great tax tips and breaks of which you may not be aware. 

Plus, a “Now You Know” on how to hack getting on the train at Penn Station.

House Dems Introduce Article of Impeachment

 

House Democrats introduced an article of impeachment against Donald Trump on Monday. It charges the President with “incitement of insurrection” for encouraging the crowd at Wednesday’s “Stop the Steal” rally to march to the U.S. Capitol. The ensuing riot temporarily shut down the legislative branch and resulted in deaths. The text follows (click to enlarge):

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Host Ben Domenech and Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky outline what drove thousands of people to Washington, D.C., to rally for President Donald Trump and how their frustrations turned into mob riot.

VP Pence Will Not Block Biden Electors

 

Vice President Mike Pence released a statement Wednesday that he will not seek to block electors for President-elect Joe Biden. The memo was issued as President Donald Trump gave a speech pressuring him to reject certifying the 2020 election. The text of the Vice President’s statement follows.

Dear Colleague: