Tag: Domestic Policy

Ayaan speaks with Speaker Newt Gingrich about growing up in the 1950s and ’60s, and how life differs today. They also discuss divisions among both the Democratic and Republican parties, what Biden should do about the situation in Ukraine, and the biggest long-term threat to America.

Speaker Newt Gingrich is Chairman of Gingrich 360, a multimedia production and consulting company based in Arlington, Virginia.  As former Speaker of the House of Representatives, Gingrich is well known as the architect of the “Contract with America” that led the Republican Party to victory in 1994, creating the first conservative majority in the House in 40 years.  He was a Republican candidate for President of the United States in 2012.

Ayaan talks with Amy Chua about how America has always demonstrated a poor understanding of tribal relations in other cultures, a weakness that makes the country ill-prepared to navigate the increasing tribalism of its own domestic politics. Amy shares her work on ‘market dominant minorities’ and ‘super-groups,’ as both women express concern about the growing political “us vs them” mentality in the United States.

Amy Chua is a Professor of Law at Yale Law School.  She received both her A.B. and her J.D. from Harvard University and was Executive Editor of the Harvard Law Review.  

Nikki Loves America

 

Ambassador Nikki Haley believes America is the greatest country in the world, and she’ll tell you why. She thinks well of our society and people, while being clear that she has seen and experienced real racism and sexism and that socialism is making a troubling resurgence in popularity. In her account of her time in the Trump administration, Amb. Haley raises concerns, which she raised publicly while in office, about the arrogance of mere appointed officials, carrying no independent constitutional authority or accountability, while contending that the real Donald J. Trump is always willing to listen and respects respectful, professional, direct expressions of disagreement. Nikki Haley puts this all together in a slim, readable volume: With All Due Respect: Defending America with Grit and Grace.

The title comes from a small but significant moment in the former South Carolina governor’s tenure as United States ambassador to the United Nations. She had gone out on a national show and spoken the last known administration position on new Russia sanctions. However, President Trump made a different decision when the staffed recommendation came to him, before Amb. Haley’s media appearance.

Instead of the Chief of Staff John Kelly, National Security Advisor Bolton, or Larry Kudlow simply speaking the truth, they went into avoidance mode, until Kudlow made the mistake of saying on the record that Nikki Haley must have just been confused. This painted the only woman in the loop, the U.N. ambassador President Trump had elevated to cabinet-level and given direct access to National Security Council deliberations, as confused, not really in the loop.

The Roadrunner President

 

TrumpRoadrunnerPresident Trump wears me out just following his schedule, and I’m two decades his junior. He seems to thrive on constant motion. Moreover, the motion is directed, purposeful.

Consider the past week: 17-25 September. President Trump went into the heart of political enemy territory to raise money, then created visuals of real new wall construction, then met with the Australian Prime Minister, set up the Democrats and their media arm, showed he was on top of disaster response in Texas, joined Prime Minister Modi in a large arena venue like a couple of rock superstars, celebrated an Australian opening a new manufacturing plant in Ohio, publicly defended religious liberty on the global stage, placed the globalist climate fraud in perspective, told the world the future belongs to patriots in every land, got multiple international agreements signed, acted as the caring friend of two feuding nuclear powers, demonstrated real transparency, exposed real corruption and collusion, and tied it all up with a bow in a level-headed tour de force press conference Wednesday morning.

Let’s break that down. I’ll break out each phase with bold and underlined section headers, so we do not get lost.

Jared Kushner: A Weak Link

 

Many of us are very pleased with the choices that President Trump has made for his cabinet and for SCOTUS. Many of those selected are familiar with the ins and outs of government, and those who aren’t are experienced with working with sensitive and global issues and leaders. So I’d like to explain my reservations with the president’s selection of Jared Kushner as a senior adviser who is now taking on the management and/or leadership of a number of projects, both domestic and international.

First, I’d like to list the roles he has been assigned with a limited description  of his duties and responsibilities:

  1. White House Office of American Innovation—this work entails coordinating between the public and private sector to streamline government.
  2. Shadow diplomat—according to the Washington Post, he is “the primary point of contact for presidents, ministers and ambassadors from more than two dozen countries.”
  3. Middle East Broker—working on a peace deal between Israelis and Palestinians.
  4. Reforming care for veterans—it isn’t clear what his role will be.
  5. Fighting opioid addiction—again, his role has not been defined publicly.

It’s been pointed out that he has many other duties in the White House, but these are the ones that have been identified.

Richard Epstein looks at recent setbacks to Obamacare — including the implosion of state exchanges — and describes what Congressional Republicans can do to reform the system without compounding uncertainty.