Tag: Diversity

Former Energy Official Lands Job as Baggage Handler

 

Sam Brinton, the disgraced Department of Energy official fired for serial theft of luggage and not for being non-binary, has found new employment at Washington, D.C.’s Dulles International Airport. “At Dulles, diversity is our strength,” said the airport’s Operations Director, Mike Stewart.

Upon hiring Brinton, airport management and the Service Employees International Union quickly renegotiated their collective bargaining agreement, creating a carve-out for Brinton against rules that prohibit high heels and long dresses from being worn in the workplace. (The attire prohibitions still apply to cis-gendered female employees.)

Area Man Suspects He’s a Diversity Hire

 

The other day it occurred to me that I’m a diversity hire. I know what you’re thinking: a white male diversity hire? I decided to run it past my husband but Chasten doesn’t like to hear about my workaday concerns when he’s trying to breastfeed the twins.

It’s really nagging me. On what possible basis could I be a diversity hire? Is it because I’m Anglican? But wasn’t Nixon-appointee John Volpe an Anglican? That would be like putting a second glazed in an assortment of doughnuts: what’s the point? They don’t think I’m a person of color, do they? But it can’t be that for the same reason as above: William Thaddeus Coleman Jr. was a person of color.

Talk about racist bridges!

Quote of the Day: The Educational Benefits of Diversity

 

MR. PARK: Diversity is our nation’s greatest source of strength, but as our Reconstruction founders understood and our nation’s history confirms, it also poses unique challenges to the American experiment. We live in a large and sometimes unwieldy democracy, and for that democracy to flourish, people of all different backgrounds and perspectives have to learn to live together and unite in common purpose….

JUSTICE THOMAS: Mr. Park, I’ve heard the word “diversity” quite a few times, and I don’t have a clue what it means.…I’d like you to give us a specific definition of diversity in the context of the University of North Carolina. And I’d also like you to give us a clear idea of exactly what the educational benefits of diversity at the University of North Carolina would be.

MR. PARK: …And so we value diversity of all different kinds in all the ways that people differ in our society. On — on the educational benefits question, Your Honor, I don’t think it’s actually disputed here that there are real and meaningful educational benefits that come with diversity of all kinds. SFFA’s own expert…conceded and agreed enthusiastically, in fact, on the stand that a racially diverse and a diverse — diversity of all kinds leads to “a deeper and richer learning environment,” leads to more creative thinking and exchange of ideas, and, critically, reduced bias between people of different backgrounds and not solely for racial backgrounds.

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Remember the time we were foolish enough to contemplate that affirmative action was finally going to be tossed into the dustbin for good? That time has come and gone. Now corporations have a new campaign for the Supreme Court’s approval of this disastrous policy under the auspices of “diversity”; since the evidence of affirmative action’s […]

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Lessons unlearned, opportunities missed by JAMA, ESPN, and Google It was quite a week for cancel culture, which claimed three trophies from three separate American institutions: Medicine, Sports Broadcasting (gambling, specifically), and Big Tech. The latest trophies on Cancel Culture’s expanding wall include Dr. Howard Bauchner, the 11-year editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American […]

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Doing the Work

 

According to increasingly popular Diversity Equity and Inclusion (DEI) programs, what our country needs is for white people to “do the work.” Full disclosure: I am white. As I think about myself, or just get up and go about my day, I really don’t think about being white. I’m sure that’s just evidence of my white privilege, but please cut me some slack. I’m really just starting to do the work.

Usually, when you start a task, it’s good to get a sense of what it will take to accomplish it. What are the action items and how long might they take to accomplish. Even though I am only beginning to learn what DEI requires and what it means to be an anti-racist, I sense that the task is daunting. Centuries of oppression will not be undone overnight. But I’m impatient and I have a lot on my to-do list. There’s unfolded laundry, a sink full of dishes, a few kids to pick up from their schools and activities. Every day. Just how long will these added anti-racist responsibilities take?

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The Equality Act is the latest mutation in a lineage of celebrated infringements of private individual rights to personal preference and property. The state has no right to violate the right of private preference or property by forbidding discrimination in privately  affairs or establishments, as does the Civil Rights Act, the Equality Act, and all […]

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Coca-Cola’s Diversity Diktat Falls Flat

 

It is a commonplace of modern rhetoric to exalt diversity and inclusion as a first step toward racial justice. The standard account, widely accepted in political and business circles, insists their combined benefits are unambiguous: a firm’s performance will improve if its employees, suppliers, and customers are composed of individuals from all races, genders, sexual orientations, and general points of view. These diverse persons are not intended as mere tokens but are respected for offering their distinct and valuable perspectives on vital matters critical to corporate and national welfare.

As an abstract matter, it is hard to oppose an employment strategy that generates higher revenues and superior innovation. But once we get down to brass tacks, the overall picture is far more complex. The massive coercion involved in implementing diversity norms was recently revealed by Coca-Cola, which has gone all-in on diversity and inclusion for its more than 700,000 employees: “We champion diversity by building a workforce as diverse as the consumers we serve. Because the more perspectives we have, the better decisions we make.”

It would, however, be a mistake to assume that Coke thinks that it has made good on its key promise. In January, Coke’s new African-American general counsel, Bradley Gayton, laid down this broadside, “Commitment to Diversity, Belonging, and Outside Counsel Diversity,” in which he describes what he perceives to be the abject failure of prior efforts to reach requisite levels of diversity and inclusion at Coke and in the legal profession more broadly. Without a link to a source or statistic, Gayton lashes into the legal profession for being “too quick to celebrate stagnant progress and reward intentions.” Gayton demands specific actions to meet the “crisis on our hands” engendered by a lack of diversity.

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three crazy martinis! They slam New York City schools for scrapping the entrance exam to the kindergarten-level gifted program because the results “don’t reflect the diversity of the city’s population.” They also discuss the allegations of sexual impropriety against longtime campaign manager John Weaver that forced him to quit the Lincoln Project. And Jim shreds CNN’s Brian Stelter and Oliver Darcy for openly encouraging cable providers to dump right-leaning channels like OANN and Newsmax.

Toxic Traits of Masculinity

 

The more obvious explanation from any outside analysis is that there seems to be a move less intended to improve men than to neuter them, to turn any and all of their virtues around on them and turn them instead into self-doubting, self-loathing objects of pity. It looks, in a word, like some type of revenge.

– Douglas Murray, The Madness of Crowds

Nasdaq’s Diversity Distraction

 

This past week, Nasdaq announced that it had applied to the Securities and Exchange Commission for authorization to impose diversity requirements on the boards of directors of its listed companies. The substantive proposal requires that each company include on its board at least two diverse directors, one of whom must be a woman (or, more precisely, one who self-identifies as female) and one who self-identifies as a member of an underrepresented minority, including “Black or African American, Hispanic or Latinx, Asian, Native American or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, two or more races or ethnicities,” or as “LGBTQ+.” Whenever these targets are not met, the listed company must offer a public explanation as to why that is the case. At no point does Nasdaq offer specific instances of intentional discrimination against members of these preferred groups.

In its SEC application, Nasdaq writes as if the new policy is all gain and no pain. It reports that its proposal has strong support from many of its member companies, a large fraction of which have already adopted similar diversity policies. For instance, a Deloitte study cited in the application notes that a majority of public and private companies surveyed have either already reviewed “their board composition, recruiting, and succession practices” to fight “racial inequality and inequity,” or intend to do so. Nasdaq cites further studies that find that companies with diverse boards have consistently higher returns on investments than those companies that ignore diversity. It thus concludes that the “benefits to stakeholders of increased diversity are becoming more apparent and include an increased variety of fresh perspectives, improved decision making and oversight, and strengthened internal controls.”

Yet, Nasdaq simultaneously laments the relatively slow rate of increase in board diversity among its member companies, noting that “the US still lags behind other jurisdictions that have imposed requirements related to board diversity.” It also asserts, without demonstrating, that if “companies recruit by skill set and expertise rather than title, they will find there is more than enough diverse talent to satisfy demand.” Nasdaq then reverses field by allowing a listed company to disclose that it does not meet the rule because it is bound by some alternative legal standard under state or federal law, or because it “has a board philosophy regarding diversity that differs from the diversity objectives set forth” in the Nasdaq rule.

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In Homer’s Odyssey, Penelope fends off the many suitors wishing to marry her while Odysseus is away by telling them that she will not choose a new husband until she had completed weaving a new shroud for her dead father-in-law, Laërtes. All day, she toils away at her loom, but still, the shroud never gets […]

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A Brave Man Stands Up

 

Jeff Poelvoorde, whom I met through mutual friends, is a smart, charming, lively, funny guy, a professor of history and politics at Converse College in South Carolina, and an orthodox rabbi. He is also courageous, and when I read his open letter to colleagues and friends, published by the National Association of Scholars, I was sad but not surprised.

The powers that be at Converse had set out “a series of measures to demonstrate the College’s seriousness in addressing the existence of racism and racial bigotry… [including] the mandatory viewing of several videos that purport to address the issues of sensitivity, bias, prejudice, diversity and inclusion.” In his response, Jeff lays out the reasons for his refusal to comply, and it is a refreshing change from the long, abject line of apologizers. The letter is also a model of understanding and manly restraint, and I believe that it is unanswerable, at least from a civilized point of view.

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http://walterewilliams.com/colleges-dupe-parents-and-taxpayers/ Colleges have been around for centuries. College students have also been around for centuries. Yet, college administrators assume that today’s students have needs that were unknown to their predecessors. Those needs include diversity and equity personnel, with massive budgets to accommodate. Preview Open

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http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20180806-how-hidden-bias-can-stop-you-getting-a-job I was just reading the BBC essay above, on problems encountered in the hiring process, and how employers can further eliminate their hidden biases. Some of it was probably helpful but one sentence jumped out at me: Preview Open

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Heather Mac Donald discusses the decline of the university and the rise of campus intellectual intolerance, the subjects of her important new book, The Diversity Delusion How Race and Gender Pandering Corrupt the University and Undermine Our Culture. She spoke at a Manhattan Institute event in autumn 2018.

Toxic ideas that originated in academia have now spread beyond the university setting, widening America’s cultural divisions. Too many college students enter the working world believing that human beings are defined by their skin color, gender, and sexual preference, and that oppression based on these characteristics defines the American experience. In The Diversity Delusion, Mac Donald argues that the root of this problem is the belief in America’s endemic racism and sexism, a belief that has spawned a massive diversity bureaucracy, especially in higher education.

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From Thomas Sowell’s 2004 book, Affirmative Action Around the World: An Empirical Study: Despite incessant repetition of the word “diversity” and sweeping dogmas about its social benefits, countries that have suffered the intergroup strife which has so often accompanied the politicization of intergroup differences have then gone to great trouble to try to create enclaves […]

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