Tag: Dissent

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A potential half-accolade for the Biden administration. I have not heard it endorse the emergency powers and other anti-protest actions and declarations of Canada’s Trudeau administration as much as I would have expected. I am open to the possibility that I missed it if the Biden administration has endorsed the actions of the Trudeau administration. […]

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Melvin Urofsky, Professor of Law & Public Policy and Professor Emeritus of History at Virginia Commonwealth University, and the author of several books, including Louis D. Brandeis: A Life and Dissent and the Supreme Court. Professor Urofsky shares insights on Justice Brandeis’s jurisprudence, and why he consistently ranks among the three most influential Supreme Court justices in American history. They discuss his understanding of American constitutionalism, and how he interpreted the law to diminish consolidated financial and federal power, what he called the “curse of bigness” – big banks and business monopolies, as well as big government. They also explore Brandeis’s dissenting opinion in the U.S. Supreme Court case New State Ice Co. v. Liebmann, perhaps the best-known 20th-century articulation of the role of the states as “laboratories of democracy” under our federal constitutional system. They delve into some of the most influential dissenting opinions in U.S. Supreme Court history. For example, Justice John Marshall Harlan, the lone dissenter in the Court’s infamous 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson case, offered legal views that would later lead to the landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision overturning “separate but equal.” Professor Urofsky also offers thoughts from his 2020 book, The Affirmative Action Puzzle: A Living History from Reconstruction to Today, on one of the thorniest political and legal topics of our era. He concludes the interview with a reading from Justice Brandeis’s concurring opinion in defense of free speech in Whitney v. California.

Stories of the Week: Cara and Gerard discuss National Charter Schools Week, and this education sector’s success in improving opportunity for underserved students. In Florida, nearly 95 percent of seniors enrolled in the state’s Tax Credit Scholarship program graduated from high school during the 2019-20 school year, the second highest graduation rate since they began tracking it in 2015. A new study of admissions at 99 colleges shows that despite adopting test-optional policies to increase diversity, the share of low-income students or students of color at these colleges has risen by only a percentage point.

Quote of the Day: Debate and Dissent are American Strengths, Not Weaknesses

 

“Our enemies have often assumed that we are soft and vulnerable, that we love luxury and tolerate dissent and argument to the point that it weakens us, They are mistaken. In the Cold War we persevered for almost fifty years (1946-1991), often against strong domestic opposition. It is because our democratic institutions tolerate — no encourage — debate and dissent that we found the resolve and the will to prevail.” — Hans Mark, from An Anxious Peace: A Cold War Memoir

This quote is from a book by Hans Mark that I am reading for review. Mark is best known for his work at NASA, but he spent a good chunk of his career developing nuclear weapons. Mark dedicated his life to fighting socialism, especially that of Communism. He viewed National Socialism through the same lens, seeing it as a second head of the two-headed monster. His family fled Austria when Mark was nine after the Nazis took over that country. He came to the United States as a refugee and became a citizen seven years later. He served in the US Navy in the 1940s.

The Nation and Dissent vs. American Affairs

 

One of my friends showed me today one of the few left-right debates available in American political talk. It’s over on Facebook, organized by lefties — editors from The Nation and Dissent. They invited Messrs. Julius Krein and Gladden Pappin, the people who run American Affairs, a journal which many on Ricochet should like. American Affairs offers a thoughtful view of populism and how Americans could take their nationalism (as opposed to importing European ideas of nationalism). American Affairs is more partisan as nationalism against globalism — less partisan as right against left — so it’s more interesting if you think a big shift might be happening in American politics.

This is a long debate, so perhaps listen only to the 20 minutes or so of opening statements. If you’re curious to see how America’s editors can talk to each other across partisan lines, then listen to it all, as I did. I’ll tell you a few things that matter about rhetoric and politics as they show up here.

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Below is the second post in my series for the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation blog, Dissident. There are two related posts by my friends Alena Hromadkova and Barbara Day that are very much worth your attention. And here is my write-up of an event to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Charter 77 at the […]

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Zweig evoked an enchanted world, ordered toward comfort and high culture. He told me that I lived in a place where everything reliable and good had been twice destroyed, like pieces in a peaceful game of chess swept to the floor by the hand of some passing sadist. And he wrote of a spiritual force […]

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