Tag: Dictators

Young Northern Irishman Cameron Hilditch returns to the show to swat away resurgent fantasies about 20th-century Portugese dictator Antonio Salazar.

Member Post

 

The news has been pretty grim regarding the new virus making the rounds of most of the world this year, wreaking havoc on China, where it originated, and spreading quickly to other countries, including the United States.  It is fortunate that so far the US has very few cases, but that could change rapidly. Now, […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

In 2016 when other presidential candidates seemed to be just getting their footing in social media no one has taken over Twitter like Republican presidential front runner Donald J. Trump.  It’s hard to see how Trump’s aggressive, compulsive, distracting, and at times attacking tweeting nature hasn’t changed the way political campaigns will be run forever. […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Tyranny Unveiled

 

FEAST_OF_GOAT_2-165x246I used to read a lot of novels. Now, alas, I don’t. Perhaps I am working too hard. Perhaps I waste a lot of time on the Internet. I really do not know. What I can say is that I really miss losing myself in a good story.

Just how much I miss it was brought home to me over the last few days. I have been working on an essay on Machiavelli’s Prince. This is a work that is now 500 years old. I gave a talk on the subject at Harvard just over a year ago, and I gave another version of the talk at a conference held at Columbia in December. In the course of trying to turn the talk into something publishable, I found myself pondering the difference between ancient and modern tyranny — between the likes of Polycrates of Samos and Joseph Stalin. It seemed to me that Machiavelli might have something to do with the reorientation of tyranny — with its acquisition of an ambition to transform human character and social relations that was absent from the aspirations of Cypselus and Periander of Corinth; Peisistratus, Hippias, and Hipparchus of Athens; and Hiero of Syracuse.

I do not mean to say that the ancient prototype is dead and gone. It is alive and well in many a corner of Africa; and, back in the third quarter of the last millennium, when I was young and the world was fresh, it was alive and well in many a corner of Latin America. Juan Peron, Perez Jimenez, Anastasio Somoza, Fulgencio Batista — those were the days!