Tag: Detroit

Kid Rock and Detroit’s Restoration

 

Detroit has a sad past with deadly riots, so I was little trepidatious when I headed downtown to the opening night of the Kid Rock concert on Sept. 12. Anti-Trump protestors were expected to swarm the streets surrounding the new Little Caesars Arena, which Kid Rock was inaugurating. I had received a note from his publicist that he would be sharing a special message with his fans regarding his political views and plans for Michigan. Smelling a formal announcement that he would run against Debbie Stabenow for Senate, press swarmed the place, and I was one of them.

Word was that Antifa was planning to create mayhem, and I was nervous enough about it to ask a buff client of mine who had military bodyguard experience to accompany me. My stalwart friend and superior half of @WhiskeyPolitics, @davesussman, worried that I might get my head bashed in whilst chatting up Antifa thugs, so he firmly suggested that I just stay away from them. Having reported on a near-riot the day Michigan passed Right-to-Work, I had no intention of taking on crazed Antifa people, but of course, once I got there with a big bodyguard, how could I resist?

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John Fund on Election Integrity and Voter Fraud

 

John FundJohn Fund (National Review and Fox News) returns to Whiskey Politics to update us on the issues discussed during our last podcast visit regarding the bipartisan Election Integrity Commission and how some 2.8 million people are registered in two or more states, and 1.8 million registered voters are dead.

John refers to “political stunts” in which state workers have declared they will deny providing data to the commission, and how powerful Democratic strongholds like Chicago and Detroit use voter fraud to elect corrupt office holders which hurt the Democratic voters who need change. We also discuss why Democrats have so often opposed efforts to crack down on voter fraud at the state level and why the Obama administration for eight years never cracked down on potential ineligible voters.

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Member Post

 

There’s been a fair bit of chatter about a “Detroit renaissance”, with artists and entrepreneurs supposedly moving to the city and breathing new life into it. There’s also perennial chatter and debate about how Chicago is able to avoid the decline that Detroit has suffered. More

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DeVos, Detroit, and a False Media Narrative

 

In advance of today’s confirmation hearings for Betsy DeVos, the nominee for Secretary of Education, defenders of the status quo have been spinning a narrative about her reform efforts in Detroit that runs contrary to all available evidence.

In op-eds, editorials, and editorials veiled as news, the New York Times has pushed the narrative that in Detroit, “charter schools often perform no better than traditional schools, and sometimes worse.” However, as Max Eden and I show at Education Next today, all the available data show that charter schools in Detroit significantly outperform their traditional district counterparts.

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Member Post

 

The liberal news media has been hammering us with Black Lives Matter for a while now. It seems that the best response we have been able to muster is “All Lives Matter”, and while that’s nice, it’s not going to do much good. This may seem hard to believe, but embracing Black Lives Matter is a perfect opportunity to render the […]

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The New York Times Misrepresents Charter School Research

 

Yesterday, the New York Times ran a front-page story purporting to show that “betting big” on charters has produced “chaos” and a “glut of schools competing for some of the nation’s poorest students.” (One wonders how many of those low-income families are upset that they have “too many” options.). However, the article’s central claim about charter school performance rests on a distorted reading of the data.

The piece claims that “half the charters perform only as well, or worse than, Detroit’s traditional public schools.” This is a distortion of the research from Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO). Although the article actually cites this research – noting that it is “considered the gold standard of measurement by charter school supporters across the country” – it only does so to show that one particular charter chain in Detroit is low performing. (For the record, the “gold standard” is actually a random-assignment study. CREDO used a matching approach, which is more like a silver standard. But I digress.) The NYT article fails to mention that the same study found that “on average, charter students in Michigan gain an additional two months of learning in reading and math over their [traditional public school] counterparts. The charter students in Detroit gain over three months per year more than their counterparts at traditional public schools.”

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Member Post

 

Bill Whittle is awesome, of course, but this time he really hits it out of the park. Topic: Detroit. More

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Detroit GOP Debate Wrap-up

 

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TDS-Logo-BLast night the remaining Republican candidates gathered in Detroit for the 11th Republican primary debate. (Yes, there has really been 11 of them.) This one was hosted by Fox News and moderated by Bret Baier, Megyn Kelly, and Chris Wallace. It was held at the Fox Theater, which seats over 5,000 people, so the crowd was big … and very loud.

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If this was how Republicans argued in televised interviews, they wouldn’t always be stuck defending themselves against Democrats’ lies. Instead of investing in fleeting individual campaigns, the Republican party should invest in promotion of videos and arguments such as this. More

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Renewing Detroit, in Fits and Starts

 

“Can Detroit come back?” One can hardly have a conversation about Detroit without that question being asked. No longer a premiere destination, Detroit has come to be associated with blight and ruin. Detroiters, however, love their city, and are working to bringing it back. They are coming up with creative ways to engage members of the community to make a real difference and change lives in different ways with varying degrees of tangible results.

A good indicator of a city’s health is the real estate market and, in that area, things are looking up. People of a variety of demographics are moving to Detroit and staying there. No longer just a city for young urban professionals, people are choosing to move into the neighborhoods when moving into a single family home rather than heading to the suburbs. Empty nesters are moving in when they’re ready for a change from the suburbs, too. Home values are going up and inventory is going down, leading to bidding wars in some areas of the city. Why is this? According to Austin Black of City Living Detroit, it’s because people are “confident in the city’s direction and want to be part of the revitalization.” This not only comes with living in Detroit, but working to make a real difference in local communities, which comes in many shapes and forms.

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The Detroit Wince

 

shutterstock_154949270I have a conference to attend in Detroit, so I flew out a few days early to visit my extended family, which is spread across Michigan.

My first stop was Sault Ste. Marie on the Canadian border. When I grabbed a meal at a local eatery the waitress asked where I drove in from. “Detroit,” I said, to which she made a funny face and said, “sorry.”

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Does Detroit Need a Homestead Act?

 

shutterstock_115828237An interesting suggestion from University of Georgia economist Jeffrey Dorfman, writing at RealClearMarkets:

A recent report by the Detroit Blight Removal Task Force calculated there were likely 72,000 blighted structures and over 6,000 vacant lots within the city of Detroit. Their latest estimate of the cost of addressing this problem is $850 million for the residential structures and between $500 million and $1 billion for the industrial sites. That is a lot of money for Detroit, and if they can come up with the money it would take a long time to complete the task. A better solution would be a city homestead act.

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Member Post

 

This story popped up on Facebook this morning and it features jaw dropping images of allegedly millions of unsold brand new cars parked all over the planet by their manufacturers to rust and remain unsold. If this is true, why don’t manufacturers push the big red “STOP” button on the assembly line until they can […]

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