Tag: Despair

I’m Just a Bill, Up on Capitol Hill…

 

The recent post by @unsk‘s “Biden and the Stalinist Thug Dems are Coming for your Guns” discusses HR127, legislation introduced by Rep. Shiela Jackson Lee (D-TX 18th) on Jan 4, the first regular order day of the current congress. Noting the bill number, I was curious as to how many bills were introduced on the first day of the session. Turns out there were 187, starting with HR1, Rep. Sarbane’s (D-MD 3rd) reintroduced proposal to revamp (read: trash) our electoral system previously discussed by Unsk back in 2019.

The cavalcade of legislative vomit wrapped up that day with HR187 introduced by Rep. Julia Brownley (D-CA 26th), which seeks to bestow permanent resident alien status on one Victoria Lopez, who apparently is not supposed to be in the country given that one of the bill’s provisions orders the Secretary of Homeland Security to rescind her deportation order.

Quite the busy day, the House opened with prayer at 10 a.m. and adjourned shortly after 5 p.m., 187 bills introduced in 420 minutes. Good substantive discussion of more than two minutes each, except for all the other things which took up the august body’s time.

Despair Is a Choice

 

He knew all the arguments for despair, and would not listen to them. – J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

Eva Cassidy was 33 years old and at the height of her creative powers when she was struck down by melanoma in 1996. At the time of her death, she was largely unknown outside the Washington D.C. area. But after her death, someone in the U.K. happened to play Eva’s recording of Somewhere Over The Rainbow on the radio and the result was that her self-recorded “Songbird” album zoomed to the top of the U.K. music charts. Only after she was gone did the world start to recognize her artistic beauty.

We’re Losing Our Boys

 

The latest tragedies, raw and painful, seem to be reflecting a similar thread: young men. Look at the age of the recent shooter at a Walmart in Texas (21 years old,) the killer in Dayton (24), the age of the boy being accused of the murder of the young co-ed at Ole Miss. Look at the ages of the boys on a murderous rampage across Canada, the Florida school shooting, the recent California shooting at the Garlic Festival, the Synagogue in Pittsburgh. They are all young men consumed with hate and vengeance, and armed to do as much damage as possible. They leave “manifestos,” they shout, “I’m angry!”, they cease to think and feel, or see their fellow human beings as part of their world.

The struggle to find blame is next. Social media, politics, violent video games, rampant porn and the new virile push of social engineering are playing a role. Young men begin as young boys, innocent, but are being influenced by all of these things, and their core personalities, their sense of self, is being corrupted, at younger and younger ages. I am not sympathizing with the killers, these acts are beyond despicable, but the patterns are showing these similarities.

The radical group Antifa, whose network now stretches across the continent to Europe, is composed of young men mostly, very angry, courting physical confrontation, and at the very least, intimidation and control.  Young women have become more fearful and maybe rightly so.  I have to think that the removal of boundaries, lack of consequences for actions, monitoring what is being taught in schools, what is accessible on the Internet, the decline of the family and faith, are now all bearing rotten fruit.  The family and the Church have always been the armor before sending young people into the world to live their dream and find their purpose, and to sustain them going forward.

Member Post

 

AOC is not my problem. Maxine Waters is not my problem. The fake indian princess and even the Muslim radical in Congress are not my problem. My problem is a great deal closer to home. Here is perhaps the most recent example, if another one doesn’t come up before I’m finished typing: Congress recently passed […]

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  This is a draft from some  muckety-mucks at the Unitarian Universalist Association to the Ministerial Fellowship Committee. Basically, Unitarian-Universalists ordain by congregation, but the UUA can confer (or deny, or in theory withdraw) “fellowship;” essentially a stamp of approval that allows church-based ministers to apply for open pulpits anywhere in the country.  Preview Open

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Just saw the new space they are moving us into at work. We are going from full cubicles with six-foot walls, which–though a nightmare in themselves–at least provide a modicum of privacy, to half cubicles with four-foot walls. In terms readers of Dante would understand, moving roughly from the third circle to the sixth. Supposedly […]

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Hillary is the President Presumptive. With a Trump loss, as Ben Domenech persuasively argues, the GOP will remain unchanged. Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan will be the leaders of the Republican Party, organizing either majorities or substantial minorities in the two houses. Hillary will not have much of a mandate, but she will certainly be […]

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As our time as a constitutional republic winds down we are naturally looking forward with some trepidation to what follows. Here are a few questions to help focus our minds on what may be in store should Donald Trump in fact ascend to the presidency. Feel free to add your own in the comments. What […]

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I was a senior in high school when I first read The Exorcist. Frankly, I found the assignment odd, wedged in, as it was, between Crime and Punishment and King Lear. Although I hadn’t yet seen the movie, scuttlebutt had it that the film was just another tired horror tale filled with the ever greater gore that was, even […]

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The Impending Darkness

 

Hard not to be gloomy sadkurtzthese days.  Just when you think there’s a chance, a glimmer, it’s gone.  Like everything else.

It turns out that not only is the universe going to die a slow cooling death, but we’re not even in an interesting time. On the other hand, the 1980s under the very real Cold War threat and a resurgent Reagan’s America was the most optimistic time I have ever had in my life. The particles were symmetrical, and the Omega point was widely presumed to be a smidge better than one. The internet of cat pictures was just an embryo.

Member Post

 

The great news about the media, even or especially the conservative media, is that they are fully seized of the fact that Donald Trump is a carnival barker who’s somehow managed to work his way into seriousness. The bad news is that they still don’t get it. Granted Trump reminds me powerfully of the movie A Face In the […]

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Can We Get Free Market Innovation in Healthcare?

 

nurse2Everyone knows how the dead hand of the FDA turns the development and delivery of new drugs into a multi-billion dollar process. And everyone knows about the liberal wish-list of compulsory coverage for health insurance products. But the extent to which regulation has progress-proofed the status quo is rarely appreciated. From ‘Certificates of Need’ — whereby investments in health facilities require the blessing of central-planning bureaucrats — to the socialization of insurance pools through ‘Community Rating,’ to forced coverage of pre-existing conditions, everything in the current system either unwittingly or deliberately resists innovation.

Where only giant organisations with vast compliance departments can meet the inhumanly complex requirements of ever-shifting regulation, where laws, upon regulations, upon rules bake-in the assumption that health insurance is the only means of delivering health outcomes, is real innovation possible? Where can the Ubers, AirBnBs or Googles of health possibly come from? Indeed, where can the sliced bread, resealable bags, or pop-tops of health come from? Where is the room for the thousand little improvements that can make life so astonishing for consumers, when the law assumes that the way things were done in 1964, 1972, or 1986 is the only way they can be done, and woe betide anyone who suggests otherwise?

America has a thriving industry inventing the next machine that goes “ping.” What it doesn’t have is innovation — let alone continuous innovation — in the wider sphere of health delivery. Instead, it has chosen to preserve, in the amber of legislation and interest-group enforced inertia, a particular industry configuration.  Sadly, there is precious little political appetite for breaking the mold.