Tag: Dept. of Veterans Affairs

President Trump to Attend New York City Veterans Day Parade

 

The Secretary of Veterans Affairs announced on Friday that President Trump would be the first president in United States history to attend the New York City Veterans Day parade on Monday. This will be the centennial of the annual commemorations on this date, starting as Armistice Day, then changing during World War II to Veterans Day in the US, and Remembrance Day in the British Commonwealth. New York City reportedly hosts the largest Veterans Day parade in the country.

It will be interesting to see if the left shows up to disrupt with their usual violent street theater. Do the mayor and governor have to show up and make nice? It would be nice to just look forward to great pictures and video of the parade participants and appreciative crowds focused on honoring our veterans.

And what about that press conference? The Q&A is informative, as the Secretary blows through the opening hostile questions and works on to substantive questions with great historical and organizational knowledge. Who knew that the Army started tracking suicide during the administration of Benjamin Harrison, concerned about our frontier army? Who knew that the suicide rates around World War I were highest among non-deployers?

On this AEI Events Podcast, you’ll hear remarks from Rep. Brad Wenstrup (R-OH) on elevating and empowering veterans through VA reform in light of President Trump’s recent executive order “Supporting Our Veterans During Their Transition from Uniformed Services to Civilian Life,” followed by a discussion with experts in veterans’ affairs.

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) recognizes that it must empower and equip veterans with the resources they need to flourish after service, but it struggles to fulfill this mission. A more integrated approach to veterans’ transition programs, including education and programs focused solely on economic opportunity, can better assist veterans reentering the workforce, fostering individual entrepreneurship while combating the harmful “broken veteran” narrative.

Veterans’ Suicides Are Increasing

 

Our veterans are dying in increasing numbers—at their own hands. I was moved to explore this topic thanks to Nicole Fisher of The Federalist’s recent article. She quoted a Department of Veteran Affairs study published in September 2017:

More than 20 veterans commit suicide each day, a number, on average, 22 times greater than the civilian population. In fact, veterans’ suicides account for 18-20 percent of suicide deaths in the country, while they make up only about 8.5 percent of the adult population.

In spite of the staggering numbers and efforts to deal with the situation, the totals continue to rise.