Tag: Denver

The Future of Our Cities

 

Buildings on Hamilton Avenue, Detroit.
In 1968, in the wake of the assassination of Martin Luther King, a great many American cities were engulfed by riots. In one such city – Detroit – the mayor, a well-meaning liberal Democrat named Jerome Cavanaugh, made a fateful decision to rein in the police and let the riot burn itself out. To his judgment, the state’s governor – George Romney – deferred, and the riots went on for five full days. “Burn, baby, burn,” they said. And burn it did.

Eighteen years before, Detroit had been the richest city in the United States – with a per capita income exceeding that in every other urban area in the country. By 1968, it was no longer so well situated. But it was prosperous. It was vibrant. The architecture was stunning; the churches, beautiful; the picture palaces, a wonder.

Join Jim and Greg as they react to the Minneapolis City Council announcing an end to the police department but only after a year of community discussions. They also react to school officials in three major cities deciding to stop having resource officers in the schools. And they unload on New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio yet again for his personal and professional approaches to the coronavirus.

New Hampshire Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut joins “The Learning Curve” for a fascinating conversation about how to accelerate innovation in schooling and scale creative models, such as the New Hampshire Career Academy and the state’s education tax credit scholarship program. Bob and Commissioner Edelblut also discuss the new NAEP results, the importance of objective measures of student performance, and the need to create learning environments that nurture students’ curiosity.

Cara and Bob break down the newly released student performance results from NAEP, known as the Nation’s Report Card. In Denver, will next week’s school board election mean a setback for school choice and accountability? In Detroit, an “equity lawsuit” that could have national implications regarding students’ “fundamental right” to a quality education is making its way through the court system.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud three members of the Kennedy family for publicly rebuking Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and others for their roles in discouraging parents from vaccinating their kids. They also roll their eyes as House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler leads a vote to hold Attorney General William Barr in contempt of Congress and declares the U.S. to be in a constitutional crisis. And they react to Denver voters narrowly approving a referendum protecting consumers of psychedelic mushrooms.

Member Post

 

Observations during our visit to Denver this year: 1. I forgot that marijuana is now a reality out here. Lately, I’m reminded every time we go out for pizza and see “Options Medical Center” nearby, in the same strip mall. My husband’s parents tell me that’s where you can go get the stuff. The name […]

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Member Post

 

We are taking the whole week off. Seminar is Monday the 20th and Tuesday the 21st. Western Chauvinist (whom we miss greatly when she’s not here) has said she’d organize a meet up in Colorado Springs, so we are planning to go there later in the week. We’d be up for any kind of informal […]

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