Tag: DC

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My sister who lives in Maryland told me that she was watching a TV station that is out of Baltimore this morning, when a red ticker tape came across the screen with the following information: There will be a weekly mandatory test of the Emergency Broadcasting System, starting February 18, 2019, lasting for five minutes […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. ACF Middlebrow #9: Justice League

 

My friend Pete Spiliakos and I bring you a discussion of one of the few truly interesting recent cinematic events, Justice League. This was an example of the conflict between artists and businessmen. Zack Snyder, one of the lonely few examplars of first-rate Hollywood talent, had his work destroyed by a studio Warner Bros / DC hellbent on suicide. Warner had the greatest team in Hollywood working on their superhero movies–Christopher Nolan (as writer and director, also with his brother Jonathan in the writing role) and Zack Snyder. The only men who have any grasp on the epic and the tragic as genres and insights. They also made billions of dollars for the studio. So naturally, the studio destroyed their work. Listen and marvel with us at the good, the bad, and the very bad, and the worse.

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The Cherry Blossom Festival is scheduled for March 20th through April 15th. I’d like to plan a meetup for Thursday or Friday (3/29 or 30) until Sunday (4/1). More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. ACF #13 Political Conflict in Marvel and DC

 

I’m back with the second part of my long conversation with my friend Pete Spiliakos. We talked about girls becoming women in despite of society in ’80s movies last time. In the most surprising way, Pete picked horror movies to show social and psychological realism. Well, he hit it out of the park there, but then our conversation veered to the aesthetic, dramatic art and the political implications of the new business model of sequels and franchises. Like it or not, in an age of sequels and franchises, it’s no longer feasible to ignore the problem of sucky sequels.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Thoughts on The Terminator

 

Recently, director James Cameron started a public quarrel over what a strong woman looks like on screen. He’s angry that Wonder Woman, an obvious sexual objectification, should be considered a strong woman. It’s a step back for the movies! Well, you can imagine the woman who directed that movie did not take this kindly, nor decided discretion was the better part of valor… I know this is a very strange kind of controversy to come out of Hollywood, but these are strange times, and despite the silliness of it all, the question of how female protagonists face up to the world is important for American society in ways Hollywood used to reflect.

So says my friend Pete Spiliakos — we recorded a podcast on the DC movies seen through political philosophy — so we’re set to talk about strong women in film. He named his titles and, among them, The Terminator (1984). So you’re in for a treat for the next ACF movie podcast, as we see what a massive difference there is between the social situation of the earliest Boomers — see my recent movie essay on Nancy Meyers — and the very last Boomers, whose formative experiences were the late ’60s and the ’70s. Meanwhile, some thoughts you may not have encountered before on The Terminator, the movie that made Cameron and Schwarzenegger stars.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. ACF #9: Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman

 

Hello, folks, this week’s podcast completes last week’s discussion of the Marvel Cinematic Universe with a discussion of the DC superhero movies. My friend and PoMoCon coconspirator Pete Spiliakos joins me–he is a columnist at First Things and writes for NRO, too. You can take my word for it, he’s the kind of conservative we need to hear more of!

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To kick off 2017, we bring you a special story of hope. When Crystal Jenkins got pregnant with her daughter in the projects of Washington DC, she had no home, no job and no hope for a better future. Drugs, crime and poverty plagued her life, but her daughter gave Crystal the strength to dream. Now she says her daughter “will have what I never had, she’ll know she can do anything she wants in this life, she’ll know she can soar…” Listen to find out how she did it.

Crystal’s testimony was taken from Little Lights Urban Ministries. Head over to their website to donate.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Holy Failed Cinematic Universe, Batman!

 

Suicide_Squad_(film)_PosterIf the reviews are accurate — and I imagine they are — Suicide Squad is now the latest in a string of big-screen misfires from DC Comics. To find the last unambiguously good movie set a DC universe (though not in the this current one) you probably have to go back a full eight years to Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight. Many of the offerings since then have been indefensible; I can confirm this with Green Lantern, and I gather that both Jonah Hex and Batman v. Superman were trainwrecks, albeit of different sorts. The better offering, including The Dark Knight Rises, Watchmen, and Man of Steel are all worth watching, albeit with caveats. During the same period, however, Marvel has churned out more than a score of films which — a few duds aside — have tended to fall somewhere between serviceable (Thor II and Ant-Man come to mind) to excellent (Iron Man, The Avengers, Guardians of the Galaxy*Captain America II).

What gives?

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Small Screen Reviews: Lucifer

 

luciTake an unusual person with social traits and mannerisms which would normally make him/her someone you’d never want near a police investigation. Then, finagle it so that person is partnered-up with a detective and accompanies the latter on regular homicide investigations. What do get? About half the shows on television at the moment. Apparently, kooky lead and detective sidekick/love interest are all the rage these days. The latest, as you probably figured out from my title and illustration, is Fox’s Lucifer.

Yes, that Lucifer. Unlike most supernatural shows where the super tries to hide its true nature from the rest of the world, Lucifer — played by Tom Ellis — wants everyone he meets to know exactly who he is. In fact his one thorn in his side is the fact his detective partner just never seems to believe him entirely. The story is that Lucifer, who rebelled against God and was banished from Heaven is now … rebelling and hanging out in Los Angeles. Better to run a nightclub than serve in Heaven. In your face, Milton!

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The only place would be in Washington, DC. How about right on the White House Lawn? Since our (sic) president seems to prefer terrorists to his law-abiding citizens, perhaps he should host them. More

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