Tag: Cybersecurity

Getting Myself Phished, a Quick Yakking about Hacking

 

Phishing is the email version of pretending to be someone you’re not. The end goal is to talk some dupe into clicking on your link, to either steal their information or otherwise break into their computer. I know a thing or two about what this is and how it works, and yet I clicked on the link last night. Let’s go straight to story mode, shall we?

I see an email in my inbox, from Admin PayPal. Subject line “Your account has been limited. (Code: E8 -s0me-malarky)” I open the email. I’ll screenshot the message for you to see it for yourself.

Member Post

 

This past week, two Florida counties experienced cyber-attacks. It was just on the news that Florida City experienced a ransomware attack, then this evening, it was announced that Mexico Beach was also attacked by ransomware, demanding $600,000 to be paid in Bitcoin, the untraceable way to pay and preferred choice of criminals, thugs and lowlifes […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

The Democrat-Deep State-Media Cover-Up that Protected the Russiagate Narrative — Revisiting the Awan Cybersecurity Scandal with Luke Rosiak Luke Rosiak is an investigative reporter for the Daily Caller News Foundation where he broke arguably one of the biggest scandals in the history of the federal government — one the media refused to cover and the […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

As a former IT auditor, I understand the value of good passwords, and of changing them from time to time.  I also value my Ricochet membership – but not more than I value my bank accounts, brokerage accounts and health insurance.  Ricochet’s password requirements are far stronger than for any other other site that I […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

I’ve been talking with someone who manages cybersecurity operations. He tells me one of the most effective security measures for consumer and employee PCs is also the simplest. If you’re just browsing the internet or using common programs, log into a user account without Administrator privileges, such as a Guest account. Whatever authorities your active […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

I posted this last week with a misleading title, making it seem like I cared about electric cars where the drivetrain was of no concern to me. I care more about a different angle: The computers enabling autonomous vehicles. It’s not the technology, or show stoppers, or people not trusting them, or any other such […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

I read a story in the LA Times (I don’t know how I got there) arguing the case of the electric car, and saying it would be a bad idea to spend lots of money on high speed mass transit (correct) because the autonomous vehicle will be everywhere before they could be completed (wrong). It’s […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

So Let’s Have a Look at CISA, Shall We?

 

One thing that may be said in CISA’s favor is that unlike certain other major pieces of legislation I could mention, it’s short. We can read the whole thing in just a few minutes here. And we should, since this whole democracy business is about governing ourselves (lest we forget).

CISA, or the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, passed the Senate yesterday by a 74-21 vote. I propose we take no one else’s word about whether it’s good or bad; approach it with an entirely open and non-partisan mind, and study its plain meaning closely together. Let’s look at the complete text, line by line. My comments will be in blue.

What Would it Take to Repair our Cyber-Security?

 

This picture taken December 26, 2011 shoThe news of the latest disaster for American intelligence broke shortly before yesterday’s Republican debate:

Officials are calling the recent hack of an unclassified email system used by the Joint Staff, which apparently from Russia, “the most sophisticated in U.S. history,” executing a kind of smash-and-grab of massive amounts of data, according to reports.

NBC News quotes unidentified U.S. officials saying the attack, which started sometime around July 25, used an automated system that collected huge amounts of data and, within a minute, sent it to thousands of locations across the Internet. Officials have said from the beginning that no classified information was exposed.

You’re From The Government? Come In!

 

shutterstock_148619159“Encryption” generally conjures up images of clandestine communication between spies, saboteurs, hackers, and the mildly paranoid, often typing away furiously on a keyboard in a dark room until someone says “I’m in!”

The truth, however, is far more mundane. Almost everyone in the West — and certainly everyone reading this — uses some kind of encryption technology on a weekly, if not daily, basis. You may not be aware that you’re using it, but you’re using it nonetheless. If you like buying things on Amazon, doing your banking from home, or paying your bills from your computer, you rely on ubiquitous, relatively inexpensive, and strong encryption. Companies also use it in a myriad of other, equally mundane, ways that are essential to their business. Encryption makes the world go ’round.

Unfortunately, it’s also useful to those trying to make the world stop. That, understandably, has FBI Director James Comey worried. In order to help fight criminals and terrorists, Comey has been calling for greater cooperation between industry and the government on encryption. Specifically, Comey wants industry to design its encryption technologies to be quickly accessible to law enforcement and national security. Just last week, Comey testified before congress to that effect (from the NYT):

A Bit of a Cyber-Coincidence?

 

CJZ15QgUwAAhRWmFirst United’s flights are halted owing to a “glitch,” and now the NYSE?

Trading in all securities were halted on the New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday following earlier reports of technical difficulties, although NYSE-listed issues was still trading on other exchanges.

After the halt, U.S. stocks extended their losses, but in low volumes, with the S&P 500 hitting a session low and the Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq both falling more than 1 percent.

Fun With Files

 

shutterstock_285175289China has scored an intelligence coup by breaking into the Office of Personnel Management database and making off with the files on millions of current and former government officials. Estimates of the number of officials whose information was taken range from a low of 4 million to 14 million. Of course, the Chinese are not going to be interested in every clerk in the bowels of the Department of Agriculture. But they will have gained access, according to reports, to the background information on all those who held sensitive national security positions in the government.

For those curious what the information contained in these files might be, here is the form for national security clearances. It basically asks for every place you have ever lived, everywhere you have gone to school and worked, any groups you have joined, the names of anyone who has known you in any of these stages of your life, extended family members, contacts with foreigners, medical information, legal affairs, and so on.  The form is 120 pages.

It is then supplemented by an FBI background investigation, which collects all information, truthful or not, unfiltered and unevaluated, about the official. As someone who has held these type of clearances, I don’t have a right to see my own file — although now I guess I can ask the Chinese for it.

Member Post

 

Thought I should bring to the attention of everybody that despite the Rico paywall, despite the ability to flag your posts to prevent them being promoted to the Main Feed, if you so much as comment on a member feed post then whatever you write is still visible to all the world. Just type “ricochet.com” […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.