Tag: Culture

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There seems to be some misunderstanding that there will there be a 6-3 conservative majority on the Supreme Court after Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed. John Roberts is not conservative in any meaningful judicial sense, neither interpreting laws based on their original public meaning (originalism) nor through some conservative view. And so, while there will […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Handy translation guide for film reviews

 

Hate to burn two hours on a movie? Are you scarred from scenes you’d rather have missed? Here is a list of common movie review words and phrases–and what they tell you about what is actually in the film.

“Sweeping” Uneven and confusing timeline. May shift back and forth between eras.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Losing the Culture

 

Granville, Ohio, is a pleasant place — tucked among the Appalachian foothills of east-central Ohio, with all the old trees and old buildings an old soul could possibly love. Granville is a college town. Its residents are healthy and wealthy and comfortable with their lives. All this means, naturally, that Granville is a Democratic stronghold.

It’s a little odd, of course, that the Denison women’s studies professor comes home, every day, to her little Greek Revival cottage built by a misogynist pig and spends her evenings toying with recipes in the same kitchen where, a century earlier, a beleaguered woman stood barefoot and pregnant, but . . . that’s the oddity of America in 2020. Those who slander the country’s patrimony with the most vehemence happen to be its custodians.

Coleman Hughes joins Brian Anderson to discuss the shooting death of Ahmaud Arbery, the widespread claims that his alleged murderers were motivated by racism, and public reaction to the killing—the subjects of Hughes’s article, “The Illusion of Certainty.”

Ahmaud Arbery’s violent death at the hands of Gregory and Travis McMichael has sparked nationwide outrage and reignited the debate over racial profiling. But “while it’s tempting to assume that the McMichaels were motivated by racism,” writes Hughes, “the only intellectually honest position is to admit that we do not know what motivated them—at least, not yet.”

This week the British bed-wetters are doubling down on the lockdown and Toby and James are thinking abut forming a new political party called the Dangerous Party for people who are pro-risk.

Speaking of risk, the lads lead off with a recount of James’ near fine and/or arrest for committing an act of journalism as the constabulary questions his presence at the Speaker’s Corner of Hyde Park yesterday (and a tip of the hat to our Twitter follower @SteveRightNLeft)

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Bubble-Wrapped Americans: How the US Became Obsessed with Physical and Emotional Safety

 

Bubble-Wrapped Americans: How the U.S. Became Obsessed with Physical and Emotional Safety“In America we say if anyone gets hurt, we will ban it for everyone everywhere for all time. And before we know it, everything is banned.” — Professor Jonathan Haidt

It’s a common refrain: We have bubble-wrapped the world. Americans in particular are obsessed with “safety.” The simplest way to get any law passed in America, be it a zoning law or a sweeping reform of the intelligence community, is to invoke a simple sentence: “A kid might get hurt.”

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Stanislaw Lem and Real Life

 

I have noticed in the past several weeks the surprise by some at what it takes to run our day-to-day lives. The stunning obliviousness as to how the things that we depend on are made and transported to us. “We must shut down the interstate rest areas,” some central planner exclaimed. Only to be shocked by the fact that truck drivers have to use the bathroom. I’m sure that planner, if he had ever been to a rest area, looked at the semis parked there with a type of resignation that he must mingle with the hoi polloi in a substandard bathroom since there wasn’t an exit nearby. It never occurring to him that every item he packed for his trip had originally traveled in a semi to get to him.

This same blindness infects the discussion of what an essential business is. “We must have protein,” the planners decide. The packing plants need to remain open. But just like they have no idea of what it takes to create a pencil, they have no idea of what’s essential beyond the slaughterhouse itself. The packing plant is essential, it must be cleaned. Are the companies that sell the water hoses, mops, rags, etc., essential as well?

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About a month ago I discovered a website in/on India called Newslaundry. Unique-ish in India because they are entirely subscriber funded, they don’t have any advertising. Read More View Post

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A true Renaissance man and one of the original “Mad Men,” Hank Wasiak is a communications industry leader with five decades of experience that took him to and through the corporate boardrooms of the marketing world’s global businesses elite, including as Vice Chairman of McCann Erickson WorldGroup. He is a founding partner at The Concept Farm, Ad Age’s Small Agency of the Year Winner, bestselling author, keynote speaker and three-time Emmy award winning television host. He has taught at six universities and been in the classroom with successive next generations of marketers for almost fifty years. For the past ten years Hank has been an adjunct professor at the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business.

Hank joins Carol Roth to talk about why companies shouldn’t go “woke,” what he wrote to the CEO of Gillette, navigating social media, rage mobs and cancel culture, Bernie Bros and the current state of students, among other topics. He also talks about leveraging asset-based thinking. Plus, a “Now You Know” piece with a toilet paper test for you!

Andrew Doyle is the man behind satirical Twitter account Titania McGrath – a radical intersectionalist, feminist, and slam poet, who is constantly telling people how oppressed she is – and author of Woke: A Guide to Social Justice. He’s back for round two where he and Bridget cover the insanity of attempting to subvert democracy in order to preserve it, the humorlessness of passionate protestors (and how hilarious Andrew finds them), infantalizing women while claiming to advocate for them, and the problem with the use of the word “privilege.” They dive into the difference between being aware of racism and calling everyone racist, how whiteness has become the original sin in the Church of Woke, why Andrew mistrusts the phrase “male feminist” and they worry about Greta Thunberg’s future, what will happen to her if one day she decides to change her mind, or her stance?

Full transcript available here: WiW69-AndrewDoyle-Transcript

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Recently a couple of articles on recent or impending scientific breakthroughs were posted in the PIT. I thought it might be interesting to get members’ takes on one of them, and what it might mean for future society, both in general and in specifics. The first involved a physicist who claims to have proved mathematically […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. There Is Hope

 

I will be the first to admit, I easily become very gloom and doom when looking at the state of our nation, especially when I talk about Millennials and Generation Z. I know young people get a bad rep – and to be fair – they deserve it. Seeing as I am technically on the older end of these self-described “woke” generations apparently wiser than their forebears, I can call it as I see it.

They are the first generations since our nation’s inception to protest for their rights to be taken away, who see kneeling during the anthem as a productive avenue for change, and are so emotionally weak they utilize university-sponsored coloring pages, cry-ins, and safe spaces to protect them from words they don’t like.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Kanye and Dylan

 

Kanye and DylanBut I want you to know, brethren, that the things which happened to me have actually turned out for the furtherance of the gospel, so that it has become evident to the whole palace guard, and to all the rest, that my chains are in Christ; and most of the brethren in the Lord, having become confident by my chains, are much more bold to speak the word without fear.

Some indeed preach Christ even from envy and strife, and some also from goodwill: The former preach Christ from selfish ambition, not sincerely, supposing to add affliction to my chains; but the latter out of love, knowing that I am appointed for the defense of the gospel. What then? Only that in every way, whether in pretense or in truth, Christ is preached; and in this I rejoice, yes, and will rejoice.

Member Post

 

Podcaster Joe Rogan recently sat down for a long conversation with id Software and Armadillo Aerospace founder John Carmack. The legendary programmer and engineer no longer designs video games or rockets. He now leads Oculus (purchased by Facebook) in improvement of virtual reality (VR) hardware and software. Read More View Post

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Member Post

 

Wherever there are free markets, there are people with poor impulse control. One can sympathize with the temptation to over-indulge. We all want more than what we can afford. But ultimately the fault of spending beyond one’s budget rests with the consumer and not with clever advertisers. That said, elderly consumers have always presented dilemmas […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. An Exceptional America

 

A few years ago, Stephen Frye toured America and produced an Englishman’s guide to the States. Perhaps sometimes we think that America influences the cultures of other countries to their deficit. Or at least that is what we are told to believe. And yes, like all neighbors, we have dirty laundry on the line. But this little clip is priceless. Frye, who I suspect has pretty much seen it all, is dumbstruck. He is left grasping for words to describe what’s taking place around him. We are ridiculous – and wonderful. What a great country. Hope abides.