Tag: Cultural Appropriation

On this episode of “The Federalist Radio Hour,” Assistant Editor Kylee Zempel joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss her recent article “Gwen Stefani Is Right: Cultural Appreciation Is Not Cultural Appropriation” and how the left’s definition of cultural appropriation skews discourse.

Friday Food and Drink Post: Cultural Appropriation Edition

 

The topic for this week’s post was inspired by Ricochet member @janbear, and the following fine paragraph from her September 25 post about the media meltdown surrounding Donald Trump’s phone call with the President of Ukraine. (Whatever his name is. “Z” something. Just like me):

Why not speculate on a different hypothetical situation? “The whistleblower says the Ukrainian president gave President Trump his grandmother’s recipe for pierogi. If true, that would be cultural appropriation.” At least it’s creative. Much better than trying to strain bites of truth from the sewage of the Democrat media reports.

As many of you know, I’m a true-blue, green-card carrying Brit, married to a man of 100% Polish extraction. I grew up in West Africa, and have lived most of my life in the United States. Cooking is one of my many hobbies, and I’m good at it (or so I’ve been told); but, to quote Socrates,”the unexamined life is not worth living,” so I have spent the last twenty-four hours examining my recipe boxes (pictured), and finding them seriously problematic and disturbing.

Cultural Appropriation: Dumb Concept. Intimidation Weapon… Prove Me Wrong

 

I write this to respond in part to @AlecDent‘s cultural appropriation article in National Review.  While I agree with the main thesis that “sksksksksksk” is not cultural appropriation, I disagree with Mr. Dent’s opinions expressed below:

The concept of cultural appropriation is hardly new, but the linguistic policing that serves as the basis for the BuzzFeed article takes it to a new level. Accusations of cultural appropriation are usually leveled against white people who adopt elements of another ethnicity’s culture in a way that is perceived as making light of that culture’s history and traditions….

An Unexpected Gift: A Culture of Appropriation

 

Years ago I was told about a family letter. In it, a relative had asked another who was into genealogy about the family history. The letter began:

When a man steals a loaf of bread, one calls him a thief. When a man steals a kingdom, one calls him “The Conqueror.”

Member Post

 

I co-host an alternative music radio show and podcast called Suburban Underground (it’s on all the podcast apps, FYI. Here’s the iTunes link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/suburban-underground/id1173099110?mt=2). My co-host (a former Ricochet member) and I have been thinking a lot about the accusations of cultural appropriation being lobbed from time to time at various artists, most hilariously at Bruno […]

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Victor Davis Hanson explains how identity politics threatens to undue America’s standing as one of history’s few successful multi-ethnic societies.

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for November 14, 2017, it’s the Overseas Trump edition of the show with your hosts, Hartford CT radio maven Todd Feinburg and all things nano person Mike Stopa. This week, we have a Filipino flavor to the podcast in honor of Trump’s visit to and bromance beginning with Rodrigo Duterte. And, in the latest edition of the Florida man saga, who is Ja Du and why does he think, in spite of all evidence to the contrary, that he is Filipino? Isn’t he culturally appropriating? Does he need a bathroom all his own? And, more seriously, why does someone who “identifies” as a different race or ethnicity need to *be* that race or ethnicity? Isn’t it enough to simply *like* Filipino food, clothing, dance, and culture? Why does Ja Du need to actually *be* Filipino? Is it possibly more a denial of his own culture – a need to rebel – that is driving him to insist that his real ethnicity is something else?

We then get into the developing relationship between Duterte and Trump. Are they, perhaps, a match made in heaven? Who are the forgotten people of the Philippines? Isn’t the system there rigged far worse than the system here?

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club for October 17, 2017, it’s the Psycho Halloween Killers edition of the show – number 144 – with your hosts, Todd Feinburg, Hartford radio guy, and Mike Stopa, nanophysicist, and today with special guest star, host of Michael in the Morningthe inimitable Michael Graham!

MG will join us, as will big cheese Rob Long, at the upcoming Ricochet meetup in Burlington, MA (just outside of Boston) on November 11, from 7-10 pm. Today he joins us to talk about the meetup and also to discuss why the left is choosing to lurch even farther left. And, in a related topic what gives when a poor Soda Pop and Pet Store owner (not kidding here) joins Donald Trump for a signing of an executive order that will help his 100+ employees get affordable health insurance only to find, when he returns to his home in central Massachusetts (yes, *that* Massachusetts) that his name is dog poo-poo? Michael will help us analyze.

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It’s nearing Halloween. Historically, this is supposed to be the time when the edges are fuzzy, weak, thinning – when the year is waning into winter, when the leaves change and the flowers die, when the air gets crisp and cool and the sun starts hibernating for more of the day. For a very long […]

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Multiculturalists tell us that strength lies in diversity. Different cultures give rise to different points of view and different ideas. Except, of course, we should not actually use any of those different ideas because that would be cultural appropriation.   Preview Open

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This move by the left to accuse people of cultural appropriation makes me sick to my stomach. It’s a stupid, pejorative name for a wonderful thing that has been going on since the dawn of man. One group sees something it likes or admires in another group, and copies it, adapts it, makes it its […]

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If you celebrate Halloween, and you are not of Irish (or, more accurately, Gaelic) descent, you are engaging in unacceptable cultural appropriation: Let’s be clear: Halloween is for Irish people and for Irish people only. Or, more precisely, it’s for people who are of sufficiently robust Gaelic descent. If you are not Irish, but you […]

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“Think of all the great restaurants!” This is inevitably the first recourse whenever someone has to define the benefits of diversity. This argument always brings Philippians 3:19 to my mind, but even so it’s a point in favor. The logic of diversity is that people with different backgrounds bring different perspectives to the table, that […]

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Katherine Timpf is one of my National Review must reads.  Today,  she reports on a petition to the president, the attorney general, and Al Sharpton to prosecute criminally Justin Timberlake for the cultural appropriation of “music, looks, and just about everything else from the black community.” Al Sharpton?  Preview Open

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Cultural Appropriation Is Sexy

 

Protest_Halloween-featIt’s difficult to imagine a more loathsome fad — or better exemplar of victim culture — than the current practice of crying “cultural appropriation” whenever a person identified with one culture uses ideas from another without approval. In the Washington Post, Cathy Young has an excellent piece cataloging some recent examples ranging from the controversy over “Kimono Wednesdays” at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts to various artists and musicians being forced to kowtow to twitter mobs for the crime of offending the easily offended. We’ve seen the phenomenon repeated at Yale and Claremont McKenna, where students who wore Mexican-themed costumes for Halloween were criticized not so much for being lazy and crass, but for using cultural ideas that were not their own “inauthentically.”

Offensive-Costumes-620x300But besides the practice’s spoil-sporting and petty totalitarianism, it’s also fantastically stupid. As with biology and technology, culture thrives when different ideas are allowed to recombine in novel ways, and declines or stagnates when it closes itself to new ideas or new combinations of old ones. After all, the only truly “authentic” cultures are all barbarous and primitive. Indeed, Matt Ridley has made a career of pointing out that sexual-style admixture is the best model for allowing distinct things — be they biological, technical, or cultural — to combine and work collaboratively, rather than compete directly with each other:

How does evolution do cumulative, combinatorial things? Well, it uses sexual reproduction. In an asexual species, if you get two different mutations in different creatures, a green one and a red one, then one has to be better than the other. One goes extinct for the other to survive. But if you have a sexual species, then it’s possible for an individual to inherit both mutations from different lineages. So what sex does is it enables the individual to draw upon the genetic innovations of the whole species. It’s not confined to its own lineage.