Tag: Crisis of faith

Member Post

 

I’m not sure what the inspiration is for the latest student publication of Harvard Divinity Bulletin. The lead story is called “Spiritual, Sexual and Religious”, by Professor Mark D. Jordan. He has a distinctive and impressive bio: https://hds.harvard.edu/people/mark-d-jordan He gives “quite a detailed”…. history of the gay movement, and his dismay that now it’s all […]

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Member Post

 

I wondered how to structure this post properly, with references, etc. but I am going to dive in off-the-cuff, because I have no reference for the information that I am learning and want to share. I obviously missed key parts of history. So I’m trying to catch up, and now current events are making more […]

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I Just Read ‘The Great Good Thing’

 

When Ricochet member @andrewklavan posted about his new book called The Great Good Thing – A Secular Jew Comes to Faith in Christ, I was curious. I was curious why he took a little flack from a few Jewish members of Ricochet when he posted about his new book, who didn’t feel he gave Judaism a fair shake. But that’s not why I ordered the book.  As a Christian, I was born into the faith, but came to a more personal faith backward and sideways, sometimes kicking and screaming. I was curious to hear about another person’s journey of faith – was it worse than mine?

So I ordered it and threw it up on my bookshelf for another day.  Published in 2016, I am three years late in picking it up, but not really. I read it at the perfect time. There are times in a person’s life when a book like this is profound and quite frankly, more appreciated, than other times. The recent deaths of people I love and thoughts about mortality and immortality flowing through my mind, rapidly changing world events, including challenges to people of faith, especially Christians and Jews, with the dramatic rise in antisemitism, religious persecution across the world, and the upcoming peace talks in Israel made it the right time.

This book is a story of a soul – we’re all born with one, and Andrew Klavan, an atheist at one time, then an agnostic, could not shake this truth. His awareness seemed to start at around eight years old. Then there was the abusive father, along with the distant mother. In the midst of great suffering, somehow his spirit was never extinguished. I am amazed at how some people can put in words what cannot be put in words. It’s like he turned himself inside out. Andrew Klavan found the words to hold his heart and soul out to the world, that others might find comfort. This book teaches how fragile children are, how innocent, and how parents especially, form their mental and emotional health and well-being.

Member Post

 

This isn’t part of the wonderful Ricochet ‘Quote of the Day Series’. I already took my turn this month – but I found the following and it’s worth repeating: “That one won’t crack, though. Mendel decided with approval; one of your flabby oak trees, Smiley was. Think you could blow him over with one puff; […]

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Bye Bye, Christians! Wait … Not So Fast

 

Is the American public becoming less religious? “Yes,” says the latest research.

Over the Thanksgiving Holiday, a poll making headlines across cable networks (love those) said mainly the new generations — Millennials and Snowflakes — are rejecting the Christian faith. It was reported that they rated the importance of faith around 20 percent, with money, success, and family at the top. Was this a misleading headline? Let’s look further…

From the Pew Research Center: “The Pew Research Center study also finds a great deal of stability in the U.S. religious landscape. The recent decrease in religious beliefs and behaviors is largely attributable to the “nones” – the growing minority of Americans, particularly in the Millennial generation, who say they do not belong to any organized faith.”