Tag: Criminals

Rafael A. Mangual joins Seth Barron to discuss New York City’s plan to replace the jail complex on Rikers Island with four borough-based jails and what it could mean for public order in the city.

New York City jails currently house a daily average of about 8,000 people, in a city of 8 million residents. Under the new plan, the borough-based jails (once constructed) will be able to house 3,300 people—less than half the city’s average daily jail population today. As Barron writes, the new target “will likely require a significant realignment of expectations about public safety.”

Anthony Daniels (known to readers as Theodore Dalrymple) joins Brian Anderson to discuss Daniels’s quarter-century of writing for City Journal and his new book, False Positive: A Year of Error, Omission, and Political Correctness in The New England Journal of Medicine.

“Theodore Dalrymple” first appeared in the pages of City Journal in 1994 with an aptly titled essay,The Knife Went In,” which recounted conversations he had had with violent felons during his time as a physician in a British inner-city hospital and prison. Since then, Daniels has written nearly 500 articles for City Journal. Selections of his essays have been compiled in the books Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass (2001) and Our Culture, What’s Left of It: The Mandarins and the Masses (2005).

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Next week the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives will take another swipe at gun owners in the guise of universal background checks. One of the main reasons that the NRA opposes this legislation  is that it doesn’t stop criminals from acquiring guns. If we would enforce the legislation already on the books, the […]

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Every relationship we have is unequal in some respect – whether we are talking about a teacher or a friend or a spouse or sibling. One person always holds more cards than does the other one. That inequality is not, in itself, a bad thing. Indeed, I think it is a feature more than a […]

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It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native American criminal class except Congress. – Pudd’nhead Wilson’s New Calendar, Mark Twain I suppose today you could add civil servants, but since civil service is the child of Congress, it is a case of knowing an entity by its fruits. […]

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Quote of the Day: Governmental Power

 

“There’s no way to rule innocent men. The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren’t enough criminals, one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws.” – Ayn Rand

I am not a big fan of Ayn Rand. (I know some of you are, but please don’t bother to convert me. It is a waste of time.) She has brilliant insights at times, however, and this is one. Somehow it seems particularly relevant after recent revelations about the corruption within the Mueller investigation.

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Maybe you can’t judge a book by its cover but you may be able to guess a criminal by his face. A couple of AI researchers in China have developed a method “automated inference on criminality based solely on still face images.” They conclude that “…the most important discovery of this research is that criminal […]

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Want to Reduce Crime? Allow Non-violent Ex-cons to Get a Job.

 

shutterstock_145411027Want to be a florist in Louisiana? You need government approval. In four other states, you need a license before you can be an interior decorator. Tennessee requires 70 days  training, a $140 fee, and two exams before allowing anyone to be a shampooer. I’m unclear how more than two months of class work is needed to lather/rinse/repeat, but government knows best.

All 50 states require millions of would-be workers to go through government-sanctioned professional boards before they can ply their trade. Now this makes sense for a CPA or a lawyer, but do bureaucrats really need to regulate upholsterers, packagers, and gas pumpers? Stephen Slivinski, an economist and researcher at Arizona State University, conducted a first-of-its-kind study on how these boards burden one group more than others. And when they make this group suffer, crime surges. I wrote about the study in this weekend’s Arizona Republic:

Employers often frown on anyone with even a non-violent criminal record, despite having the skills and education required for the job. Where this tendency is most apparent is the byzantine system of professional licenses and certifications required by many states…