Tag: Criminal Justice Reform

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Rafael A. Mangual joins Seth Barron to discuss New York City’s plan to replace the jail complex on Rikers Island with four borough-based jails and what it could mean for public order in the city. New York City jails currently house a daily average of about 8,000 people, in a city of 8 million residents. Under the new plan, the borough-based jails (once constructed) will be able […]

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Steven Malanga and Rafael Mangual join Seth Barron to discuss concerns that lawlessness is returning to American cities, a theme that Malanga and Mangual explore in separate feature stories in the Summer 2019 Issue of City Journal. Memories of the urban chaos and disorder of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s have faded, and many local leaders today have forgotten the lessons […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Compassion in Deed

 

There are those who mouth pieties about compassion. Former president George W. Bush comes to mind, perhaps because he made such a point, with his father, of distinguishing himself from that mean man (according to all the best sort of people) Ronald Reagan. Bush 41 touted “a thousand points of light,” and backhanded Reagan with his inauguration address. Bush 43 proclaimed himself a “compassionate conservative.”

“I call my philosophy and approach compassionate conservatism. It is compassionate to actively help our fellow citizens in need. It is conservative to insist on responsibility and results. And with this hopeful approach, we will make a real difference in people’s lives.”

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Rafael Mangual joins Seth Barron to discuss the disturbing leftward trend among urban prosecutors in major cities and the consequences of undoing the crime-fighting revolution of the 1990s. In recent years, cities like Philadelphia and Chicago have elected district attorneys dedicated to the principles of social-justice and the goal of “dismantling mass incarceration.” The shift away from proactive […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud the Senate for approving the criminal justice reform bill known as the First Step Act. While still a bit uneasy about some details, they generally like the emphasis on teaching inmates how to live an honest life when they get out of prison […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America react to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announcing there will be a vote on the criminal justice reform bill known as the FIRST STEP Act. They also discuss Time magazine’s selection of Jamal Khashoggi and other murdered and persecuted journalists as the “Person of […]

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The Urbane Cowboys are back! We talk criminal justice reform with Dr. Derek Cohen of Texas Public Policy Foundation. Afterwards, Josiah Neeley and I discuss our plans for the podcast and our political philosophies. More

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This Viewpoint Podcast features a conversation with John Huffingon who, after spending 32 years in prison — 10 of which were on death row — maintained his innocence, and was ultimately released from prison in 2013 through a writ of actual innocence. Today, John works for Living Classrooms in Baltimore, where he runs programs to […]

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In Banter’s third installment of the “Bridging the Dignity Divide” series, AEI Resident Fellow Gerard Robinson once again takes over as guest host. On this episode, he is joined by Grant Duwe of the Minnesota Department of Corrections to discuss prison education and evidence-based criminal justice reform. Duwe also serves as an academic adviser to […]

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In Banter’s second installment of the “Bridging the Dignity Divide” series, AEI Resident Fellow Gerard Robinson takes over as guest host. In part one of this episode, Gerard interviews Renita Seabrook who serves as an associate professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Baltimore. In part two, Ames Grawert from the […]

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In this AEI Events Podcast, AEI’s Gerard Robinson hosts Senate Committee on the Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA), who addresses the bipartisan Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2015 he cosponsored with Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) and several other lawmakers. This aims to cut mandatory minimums, grant judges greater sentencing discretion, and help prisoners successfully […]

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On this week’s Banter, Pat Nolan and Hayne Yoon join the show to talk criminal justice reform. Nolan is the director of the American Conservative Union Foundation’s Center for Criminal Justice Reform and is a leader of Right on Crime, a national movement of conservative leaders supporting reforms to the US criminal justice system. Yoon […]

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 I wholeheartedly agree that some areas of the criminal justice system are broken. Here is something I did not know coming out of New Mexico (late 2016): Can’t Afford Bail? In One State, That Doesn’t Matter Anymore. “In New Mexico, as in the majority of the nation, judges use bail to detain people who they […]

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Law and Order, Donald Trump

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Trump and Law and Order

 

City Journal editor Brian C. Anderson and contributing editor Heather Mac Donald (author of the New York Times bestseller “The War on Cops“) discuss law and order in the Donald Trump administration, how the left’s anti-police narrative contributed to his victory, and Trump’s choice to head the Justice Department.

“Donald Trump was the only person that was willing to talk about the breakdown of law and order in the inner cities and saying that that is the most fundamental government responsibility, without which nothing else matters.” — Heather Mac Donald

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Some Computer Crimes Are More Equal than Others

 

CorreaSee this man? His name is Christopher Correa. He did a very bad thing with a computer. Today a Federal Judge sentenced him to 46 months behind bars and ordered him to pay almost $300,000 in restitution to his victims.

“This is a very serious offense, and obviously the court saw it as well,” US Attorney Kenneth Magidson said, feeling justifiably proud of himself for having secured a verdict meant to deliver a very important message — accessing Top Secret information and sharing it with others will not be tolerated no matter how powerful or well connected you are.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Criminal Justice Reform Is Necessary

 

Jails-620x394My friend Sean Kennedy asserts in a column at Real Clear Policy that the “Bipartisan Push for Criminal Justice Reform Is Misguided.” I respectfully disagree. On the contrary, criminal justice reform is a conservative effort that is necessary to restrain government that has grown too large, powerful, and costly.

Criminal justice reform, or CJR for short, is a broad-based movement made up of numerous policy reforms taking place mostly at the state level. Texas has pioneered many of the reforms and has inspired a growing number of states to follow suit which has led to, among other beneficial results, reduced recidivism rates and lower prison costs.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Civil Asset Forfeiture Has Been Eliminated in the Cornhusker State

 

civil-asset-forfeiture-591x394In a boon to innocent property owners in the Cornhusker State, Nebraska has become the tenth state in the country to require a criminal conviction in all or most cases before law enforcement agencies may perfect a forfeiture proceeding.

Asset forfeiture is the process by which law enforcement agencies can seize and keep property suspected of being involved in criminal activity. While purported to be a crime-fighting tool, the process has blossomed beyond this original purpose, whereby even innocent property owners—who oftentimes aren’t even charged with a crime—have been ensnared into a net cast too wide. As a result, modern civil forfeiture has become a multi-billion dollar windfall for law enforcement agencies nationwide in the past several decades, who have overleveraged themselves on a practice at odds with constitutional liberties.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Colson Task Force Details Recommendations for Federal Corrections Reform

 

10522In a press conference today, members of the Charles Colson Task Force on Federal Corrections released a report detailing the findings of their year-long effort to identify the main drivers of federal corrections growth, and have recommended many broad reforms that states have adopted recently.

Over the course of the last ten years, states have confronted a stark realization that the previous decade’s worth of largely unrestrained growth in their corrections systems has become unsustainable. Not only were states lacking a return on their investment in terms of public safety — evidenced in part by stubbornly high recidivism rates — but, in pure dollar terms, their corrections expenditures have often times been the second fastest-growing area of their respective budgets (behind Medicaid).

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Comprehensive and Common Sense Justice Reform in Maryland

 

Jails-620x394Last week in the Baltimore Sun, Robert Ehrlich highlighted a comprehensive justice reform package released last month in Maryland that seeks to “further reduce the state’s incarcerated population, reduce spending on corrections, and reinvest in strategies to increase public safety and reduce recidivism.”

Compiled by the “Justice Reinvestment Coordinating Panel,” which convened upon Gov. Larry Hogan’s signature of legislation during the 2015 session, the package addresses years worth of growing expenses in Maryland that has lead to, in Ehrlich’s words, a “bloated and inefficient” corrections system:

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