Tag: Crime

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My discussion question for today: In a world with global and highly-efficient transportation and communications…and billions of people who are accustomed to low wages…is it possible for a country such as the United States to maintain its accustomed high standards of living for the large majority of its people?…and, if so, what are the key […]

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City Journal contributing editor Judge Glock joins Brian Anderson to discuss public policies that encourage drug addiction, the relationship of drug abuse to homelessness and crime, and the wisdom of government intervention in the economy.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Rafael A. Mangual and Peter Moskos discuss the causes of the post-2020 crime spike, how violence affects everything from quality of life to childhood education, and the distance between theory and practice in the criminal-justice world. Mangual’s new book, Criminal (In)Justice: What the Push for Decarceration and Depolicing Gets Wrong and Who It Hurts Most, is out now.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Ayaan speaks with Rafael about his childhood, violent crime, the breakdown of family, antisocial behavior, and rehabilitation. They also discuss Rafael’s new book Criminal (In)justice, a critique of our increasingly radical criminal justice reform movement. Finally, how do we remind Americans of the inherent good of America?

Rafael Mangual is a senior fellow and head of research for the Policing and Public Safety Initiative at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor of City Journal. He has authored and co-authored a number of MI reports and op-eds on issues ranging from urban crime and jail violence to broader matters of criminal and civil justice reform. His work has been featured and mentioned in a wide array of publications, including the Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, New York Post, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Philadelphia Inquirer and City Journal. Mangual also regularly appears on Fox News and has made a number of national and local television and radio appearances on outlets such as C-SPAN and Bloomberg Radio. In 2020, he was appointed to serve a four-year term as a member of the New York State Advisory Committee of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with Rafael Mangual, Manhattan Institute senior fellow, about his newly released book, Criminal (In)Justice, examining where crime is occurring in the U.S., what types of crimes those in the prison systems have committed, and the tradeoffs faced by society when considering defunding the police and reducing prison populations.

Guest:

It’s all crazy martinis today! Join Jim and Greg as they break down the criticism of First Lady Jill Biden after her cringeworthy pandering to Latinos in Texas. They also the growing evidence that the story of a 10-year-old girl being raped and denied an abortion may be pure fiction. And they groan at the calls for Tucker Carlson and Jon Stewart to run for president – which Stewart is thankfully rejecting at this point.

 

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Gavin Newsom has joined Truth Social, in search of some truth and partisan advantage. His first search topic, Murder rates, why are red states so murdery? Red States? I just joined Trump’s Truth Social. Going to be on there calling out Republican lies. This could get…interesting. My first post — breaking down America’s red state […]

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Former federal prosecutor and National Review Online Contributing Editor Andrew C. McCarthy is in for Jim. Join Andy and Greg as they break down a Supreme Court ruling on whether double jeopardy protections exist between different systems or “sovereigns” – in this case whether a conviction is allowed in federal court after a verdict was rendered on similar offenses in the Court of Indian Offenses in Arizona. They also parse two rulings on immigration cases that came down on Monday. Finally, Andy also lays into the January 6th committee for being little more than a political performance by not allowing Republicans to choose their own committee members and not permitting cross-examination of witnesses.

Member Post

 

Another Ricochetti (Ricochettum as singular?) (*)  commented, “Conservatives have statistics, liberals have anecdotes.” I propose that we practice developing and using more anecdotes to help our neighbors better understand the gun debate. So many people seem to reason in anecdotes, and so few people seem to be able to deal with statistics. As a lawyer, […]

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Join Jim & Greg as they discuss a right-leaning candidate looking very competitive in the Los Angeles mayor’s race. They also shudder as Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen says we may well be headed towards economic “stagflation”. And Jim walks through the facts and fiction as cases of Monkeypox are confirmed in the U.S. and the UK.

 

Former prosecutor and new Manhattan Institute adjunct fellow Thomas Hogan joins Brian Anderson to discuss America’s best—and worst—district attorneys, the Chesa Boudin recall campaign, and the future of “progressive prosecution” in the United States.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Nicole Gelinas joins Brian Anderson to discuss the consequences of inflation in New York City and the impact of rising subway crime.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Former NYPD intelligence analyst and Manhattan Institute director of policing and public safety Hannah Meyers joins Brian Anderson to discuss last week’s subway attack in New York City, the intersection of homelessness, transit crime, and mental illness, and Eric Adams’s efforts to bring down crime in Gotham.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome even more data showing that criminals steer clear from people they suspect may have guns. They also discuss whether the increasing chatter about Russia being willing to use tactical nukes against Ukraine is based in reality. And they wonder why one of the shooters arrested as part of the probe into Saturday’s mass shooting in South Carolina was allowed to go home and might be permitted to go back to work with an ankle monitor.

Join Jim and Greg as they cover President Biden’s latest all-time low approval rating. Despite delivering a Supreme Court Justice and the waning of the COVID-19 virus, Biden’s approval percentage sank to just 42% in the latest CBS New/YouGov Poll.  They also analyze the host of factors contributing to increasing despair and hopelessness in the American teenager including social media, COVID-19, and the media. And in a desperate attempt to appease his increasingly dissatisfied base, President Biden is taking steps to counter “ghost guns” this week.

Jim and Greg welcome Byron York, host of The Byron York Show podcast and chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner to preview the 2022 midterm elections. They examine the many factors suggesting this could be a big year for Republicans – from President Biden’s deep unpopularity to the many issues breaking in their favor. They also look at potential stumbling blocks for the GOP and how this year of great political potential could end up as a disappointment. And they consider what wildcards could impact this election season.

In this week’s special episode, former prosecutors Thomas Hogan and Jim Quinn join Rafael A. Mangual to discuss new Manhattan district attorney Alvin Bragg and the options available to preserve public order when prosecutors won’t prosecute.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

On Crime, Democrats Become the Party of Limited Government

 

The Democrat Mayor of Chicago blames businesses for the increase in retail theft, telling store owners they should be hiring private security, not depending on the police or the courts to enforce the law. An hour or so north in Milwaukee, Democrats on the city council are blaming automakers for the rash of carjackings and car thefts, saying cars are too easy to steal. In Los Angeles, the local district attorney (a Democrat) is blaming the railroad company for the robbing and looting of trains passing through the city, saying the railroad isn’t employing enough private security.

This is the same Democrat Party that has been, for over a century now, the party of Big Government; the party that insists that all progress must be collective and directed by experts. The Democrat Party that insists “Taxes are what we pay for living in a civilized society.” The Democrat Party that has always mocked rugged individualism and attacked their occasional opposition party as the “You’re on your own” party. They have always insisted that it is large, empowered Government that will solve all of society’s problem.