Tag: COVID

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Covid-19: My New York Experience

 

I can’t help but feel that there are two different experiences in the country with the coronavirus. There is the east coast experience and there is the rest of the country. When one looks at the state by state numbers, the two states of New York and New Jersey make up about a third of all the cases in the country and over 40% of the deaths. And the New York State numbers are incredibly skewed to New York City. I think it’s pretty much acknowledged that New York City and the surrounding suburbs have been the epicenter of the contagion. It does not surprise me then that we are reacting to the lockdown differently.

Here is my experience as a New Yorker, albeit one from Staten Island, which is subtly different than one from Manhattan. But Manhattan has actually been spared, relatively speaking. It’s the outer boroughs of the city that has absorbed the brunt of the pandemic.

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I own two face masks; my fetching spouse of 36 years, at least 2 or 3. Our Governor here in Pennsylvania, Tom Wolf long commanded us under his virtually unlimited emergency powers to wear “face diapers” in public places, indoors. Outdoors is “optional,” but “recommended.” Virginia’s Governor, quite belatedly, has just followed suit. I see […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the nearly unanimous public condemnation of the treatment of George Floyd and that there must be justice in the case. They also note that some will try to use the looting and arson from Wednesday night to drives wedges in that united front. They also unload on New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo for having the gall to suggest that nursing homes are to blame for accepting COVID-positive patients when New York forbid nursing homes from rejecting such patients or even testing incoming patients for COVID-19. And as CBS is forced to make layoffs in the news division, they’re stunned to see news reports that the list reportedly includes respected White House reporter Mark Knoller.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Unwind from China? Can It Be Done?

 

This is a subject that has come up first in the comments with the @jameslileks post “Watching the CCP Press,” and which @iWe explored further by asking “whether one would trade with Nazi Germany.” We need additional information, indeed hard data, to even begin to look at the practicalities. Some here have mandated that we somehow absolutely cease trade with China. Others (and indeed most, I should think) would argue that an absolute embargo is both undesirable, and indeed impossible in any situation short of open warfare, but that we should certainly reevaluate what we are trading with China, and how we are doing so.

But to even have that discussion we need to know something of the extent of what we buy from China (and really, from everywhere else too), and how that really affects us, otherwise, should the absolutists be granted their immediate wish and all trade cease, the results may be distinctly unpleasant. I own and run a company that manufactures electronics, and so, at least as far as electronics go, I do have rather a lot of insight into what exactly comes out of China, and whether alternatives exist. I have done a Country of Origin query on the bills of materials (BOMs) for a couple of my products, and will detail those below, and what the implications are.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. There’s a Fine Line Between Prudence and Panic…

 

…and we crossed that line a long time ago.

Over the weekend on Facebook, I repeated a line that I heard at the beginning of the COVID-19 freakout, “There is a fine line between prudence and panic” and commented that we are so far beyond the line that it is no longer funny and is now just sad. Someone responded that we obviously weren’t panicking because 100,000 people are dead and that I (and apparently I alone) am the reason that we can’t open up the economy. Sorry, but that guy was wrong — as a nation, we are in full-blown panic mode, and I think the latest fight over masks proves that beyond any reasonable doubt.

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Join host Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer’s Bill Smith in a conversation with Hannah Mamuszka, expert in diagnostic medicine, on why the U.S. lacked adequate early testing, what current testing looks like in the Commonwealth, and where testing technology needs to be to support public gatherings in the future.

Hannah Mamuszka is Founder & CEO of ALVA10, a healthcare technology firm. Hannah has spent her 20+ year career in diagnostics – both in pharma and at diagnostics companies, in the lab and on the business side. She believes that the challenges of diagnostic technology fully impacting patient care are more commercial than technical, and conceived of ALVA10 to create a mechanism to pull technology into healthcare by aligning incentives through data. She regularly speaks on issues regarding advancement of technology in healthcare, is on the Board of Directors for two diagnostic companies and writes a column on the value of diagnostics for the Journal of Precision Medicine.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Perhaps you remember this story in The Atlantic a few weeks ago, as Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp announced his state was going to begin reopening towards the end of April following a gubernatorial-led national shutdown of our economy. This paragraph is notable: Kemp’s order shocked people across the country. For weeks, Americans have watched the […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. We Cannot Survive Without Risk

 

playgroundIn strange times, what was once commonplace now seems bizarre. I was walking the dogs earlier this week and a couple of kids on bikes in a nearby park stuck with me. I watched as the boy and girl – probably around 11- or 12-years-old rode their bikes through the grass and down a slope steep enough that in winter makes for a black-diamond sledding hill. Neither child wore helmets nor shoes. The girl’s long, golden hair carried by the breeze was the last I saw as the pair peddled furiously out of view. I looked around. No parents. No nanny. No park overseer waiting to scold them for enjoying a sunny afternoon with such reckless abandon. I smiled at the thought that even in this time of modified police state, there were these two kids unaware of the cynical, fearful world beyond the park. Then it made me sad. I wasn’t mournful in a sense of lost nostalgia, but I realized these kids were an endangered species. And if the government had its way, they would be extinct.

On Wednesday, the Centers for Disease Control released statistics showing the US birthrate fell to the lowest level since the data was collected in 1909. And 2019 births numbered approximately 3.75 million – the lowest level in 35 years. Experts attribute the decline to women waiting to start families later in life, after they establish a career and lifestyle. But there is another layer. Americans are losing the faculty for risk. We have long enjoyed the reputation and benefit of a society willing to join the fray up to the point of near brashness and unbridled enthusiasm for venturing into the unknown. We leveraged a font of freedom combined with ingenuity and liberty that created a great nation of unlimited opportunity.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A ‘Patchwork’ Approach to Normalcy

 

Last week, the Wisconsin Supreme Court struck a fatal blow to Governor Tony Evers and his “Safer at Home” plans. Evers, and secretary-designee of the Department of Human Services (DHS), Andrea Palm, first issued an Emergency Declaration in March, followed by the “Safer at Home” orders that were set to expire on April 24. Shortly before that expiration, Evers and Palm extended the “Safer at Home” orders until May 26. Republicans in the state legislature sued, in part because Palm — not an elected official, but a political appointee — did not have the authority to impose criminal penalties through that order. The 4-3 decision called Palm’s order “unlawful, invalid, and unenforceable.”

The Evers administration was, unsurprisingly, displeased with the state Supreme Court’s ruling. In a call to reporters, Evers accused the state Republicans of being “unconcerned about…massive confusion that will exist without a statewide approach” with the media calling it a “patchwork approach.”

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In this episode, Host Joe Selvaggi is joined by Pioneer Research Analyst Rebecca Paxton to get reactions to Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker’s phased reopening, from the leaders of two statewide business organizations, NFIB and Retailers Association of Massachusetts. The guests share their concerns and disappointment with Gov. Baker’s plan, contending that good policy requires us to trust business leaders to protect the needs and safety of their clientele.

Guests:

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We live in a time where a pandemic seemed almost impossible until this one. Modern advances in science (biological, medical, vaccines and drugs), spurred by capitalism, have given us amazing tools to diagnose, treat, prevent, and even cure many terrible diseases. This prolonged success has also given us the illusion that a healthy society is […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Pennsylvania, Meet Florida: Startling Facts About COVID-Related Nursing Home Deaths

 

Pennsylvania, meet Florida.

You’re smaller than Florida, with a population of 12.8 million compared to some 21 million in Florida. And Florida’s population is proportionately older; 20.5 percent of Florida’s residents are over age 65, compared to 18.2 percent in the Keystone State.

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Join Jim and Greg as they react to Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr stepping down from his committee post as the FBI investigation deepens into his coronavirus-related investment decisions. They also assess why Joe Biden keeps moving far left even though he has the Democratic nomination wrapped up. And they recoil as those quick-response COVID tests used by the White House and other places are found to deliver false negatives anywhere from 33-48 percent of the time.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I still have not received the coronavirus bailout check. (Was that the “CARES” Act?) Fortunately, I do not need it. My wife and I remain employed and both of us already work from home. Probably we would have gotten the money by now if we’d gone in the IRS website and given them our bank […]

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James R. Copland joins Brian Anderson to discuss how America’s uniquely cumbersome regulatory system impeded the national response to the Covid-19 crisis and how costly litigation could damage the economy even further.

The FDA and CDC’s administrative failings in the early days of the crisis proved costly. The federal process for reviewing and approving drugs and medical devices, writes Copland, still leaves much to be desired. And a wave of coronavirus-related lawsuits poses a serious threat to future business viability.

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Join Jim and Greg as they’re glad to see New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo finally changing the rule that required nursing homes to accept recovering, yet contagious, COVID-19 patients. They also cringe as Dr. Fauci confirms there will be no vaccine or treatment in time for the start of the new school year, sparking all sorts of discussion about what school might look like in the fall. And while the media focus on Trump’s clash with the media on testing and blame for China, Jim says the real story is China’s actions and it’s aggressive propaganda efforts.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Ricochet COVID Symposium: The Grief of COVID

 

[Editor’s Note: This is part of a series of contributions from our members and friends about the hidden costs of the COVID crisis. You can read more about our symposium and how to contribute here.]

Right now, I am sitting on my sofa, a cup of tea, and my laptop in front of me. There is not much to do on a Saturday night in Milwaukee these days. Bars, restaurants, and movie theaters remain closed under Governor Tony Evers’ “Safer at Home” orders, which may or may not expire May 26. We’re waiting on a ruling from the Wisconsin Supreme Court challenging the authority of Wisconsin’s Department of Health and Human Services to implement and enforce the shelter-in-place orders that have ground the economy, and life as we knew it, to a halt.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. COVID Congratulations!

 

Congratulations should be in order. The public health leadership asked us to give them time, to change our lifestyles to slow the progression of the disease. At great personal and social cost, we successfully flattened the curve. We bought time for the medical and research professionals to catch up. Outside of the New York City DeBlasio Debacle, we did what everyone was asking of us, and the results are showing it. This should be a time to start relaxing the lockdown, as it has succeeded outside of NYC. Tim Carney speaks for me here.

What’s utterly infuriated to me is that a lot of people are trying to claim this is a failure.

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Two good martinis and one very bad one as we head into Mother’s Day weekend. Join Jim and Greg as they marvel at how well Florida has done thus far in warding off virus that’s particularly rough on the elderly. They also shudder deeply as the U.S. lost a stunning 20.5 million jobs in April and the unemployment rate soared to 14.7 percent. And they welcome news that the percentage of positive COVID tests is declining at testing ramps up.

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Morning radio talker Hugh Hewitt also writes an opinion column for the Washington Post, one of only two bonafide conservatives (the other being Marc Thiessen) to do so. I am a great admirer of Hugh, despite being an Ohio “homer” and incessant Cleveland sports fan. His columns are a nice extension of his thoughtful, intelligent, […]

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