Tag: COVID-19

Allison Schrager joins Brian Anderson to discuss economic trends in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, how the stock market has performed during the crisis, and why expensive infrastructure projects are a risky strategy for reviving the economy.

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A group of oncologists estimate that 60,000 people in the UK will die of cancer because they were unable to get adequate treatment due to COVID-19 restrictions. I am torn about what to think about this estimate. Why should one trust the prognostications of a group of oncologists any more than one trusts the prognostications […]

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Thursday, June 25, marked the one hundred sixty-first continuous day at sea for the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower and the USS San Jacinto. And as far as the US Naval History and Heritage Command can tell, this deployment appears to be a record for the Navy. The Navy News Service reports that both ships left […]

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We really should have been getting these weekly, with members compelled to address the massive protests starting just about the supposed incubation period ago. But, the Vice President did not push and President Trump did not see the defensive value. So, here we are with them reacting to a new media and public official panic. […]

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Up front bias disclosure: I have complained ever since the “stay at home” orders were first extended past the initial two weeks that I did not think that the collateral effects of the “stay at home” (lockdown) orders were given adequate consideration to balance the singular focus on stopping the Wuhan Covid-19 virus. So I […]

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In the current economic calamity, created by government edict, President Trump declined to add insult to injury with default level work visa issuance. Mark Kirkorian’s assessment is far more positive than he has sounded in a long time, even about the Trump administration. At the same time, illegal immigrants and their organized leftist enablers have […]

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Disease and Death are making a summer of it. Disease in the form of COVID-19 is surging again following re-opening of the economy across the land. Whether you want to call it a first or second wave, numbers of new cases are at the highest level ever in many places. This is reflected by similar […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. ‘Don’t Touch My Dog!’

 

This morning on my walk, I felt as if I’d been slapped.

Early mornings I love to greet the regular walkers on my route. I also wave at people in their cars, and many of them wave back with big smiles. Those smiles mean a lot to me as we navigate appropriate behavior during this wretched virus time.

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Friday was up supposed to be graduation for the high school in my town. However, about a week and a half before that, Black Lives Matter started advertising a march through town with a rally at the high school that very same night. Liberal locals then let the school board know that they couldn’t possibly […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Beware of Tort Liability for COVID Cases

 

Now that American businesses are beginning to reopen, Congress must decide whether these firms should receive protections against suits for liability brought by their customers and employees who claim that they have contracted COVID-19 at those business establishments. The question has given rise to deep partisan divisions. Republicans, led by Senator Mitch McConnell, are adamant that any reform legislation adopted by Congress should include explicit protections from all tort liability. Democrats, along with their union and trial lawyer backers, oppose any and all protections, insisting that the usual standards of “reasonable care” afford these firms the only legal protection they need.

American Association for Justice CEO Linda Lipsen states the point tartly: “Sen. McConnell has been promoting immunity for companies that act unreasonably for over 30 years…This move to hold this covid package hostage with his agenda items is unpatriotic. Indeed, the trial lawyers and their union allies insist that a blanket waiver will only encourage reckless conduct by firms. Their concerns notwithstanding, a number of states have sought to provide exactly that protection by executive order. Moreover, employers are demanding that both employees and customers sign waivers of liability if they want to return to work or receive their services.

Back before the election in December James and Toby worried about their fate under a Corbyn Government. Now the Cultural Revolution is back with a vengeance and the worries return, particularly if more left-wing college graduates lose their jobs.

Also, should we shut down The Guardian because of its links to the slave trade and the row created by Boris’s new race relations tsar.

Join host Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer Senior Fellow Josh Archambault as they talk with Dr. David King about the experience of being in emergent care during a pandemic and lockdown. They explore the challenges of coping with a poorly understood virus during a lockdown, all while continuing to serve the sick.

Guest:

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Unexpected Job Losses

 

We have a basic unlimited car wash plan with a chain car wash. No, it isn’t A1A Car Wash, even though we’re in Albuquerque. It’s an automated car wash with an option to have interior work done. During the lockdown, they closed their locations and stopped charging the monthly fee. They would occasionally send me messages about plans they were working on to reopen safely. Sometime around May 10, they reopened for exterior service only.

In the Before Time, there were maybe 15 people working a shift. Cashiers for the interior and exterior lanes, four to six people working the interior cleaning, a person on the entry of the wash, two people wiping cars as they exit the wash, two or three doing interior cleaning on exit, and I’m sure a shift manager somewhere. Now there are maybe three or four people working. One cashier, since only the exterior lane is open; one at the entrance to the wash; one at the exit probably watching so the wash doesn’t have an issue; and probably a shift manager.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome Louisville’s decision to end no-knock warrants. They also hammer Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan for claiming nothing is really different in Seattle, despite the creation of CHAZ, the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone, where police are not allowed in and reports of violent crime are on the rise. And they welcome the news that the Lake of the Ozarks pool party and symptomatic hair stylists have not led to outbreaks of COVID-19. They also embark on fun tangents about “Law & Order” and the 2020 convention season.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Lancet’s COVID Fiasco

 

On June 4, The Lancet, a venerable British medical publication, formally retracted a thoroughly flawed study on the drug hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), originally published on May 22. The study was led by Dr. Mandeep R. Mehra, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School—and one of its co-authors was Dr. Sapan Desai, CEO of the small healthcare startup Surgisphere, which performed the study. Immediately upon publication, Surgisphere sought to parry charges that its data was flawed by claiming that contractual restrictions forbade it from sharing its granular datasets with outside parties for review and verification.

The key findings of the study were stunners: most critically, that the use of HCQ led to a substantial increase in mortality rates—around 30 percent—and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in these COVID-19 patients.

Join Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer’s Mary Connaughton as they talk with MIT Professor Charles Stewart on how states in general, and Massachusetts in particular, are adapting their voting process to keep elections safe, transparent, and fair during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Charles Stewart III is the Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Political Science at MIT, where he has taught since 1985, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His research and teaching areas include congressional politics, elections, and American political development. Since 2001, Professor Stewart has been a member of the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project, a leading research efforts that applies scientific analysis to questions about election technology, election administration, and election reform. He is currently the MIT director of the project. Professor Stewart is an established leader in the analysis of the performance of election systems and the quantitative assessment of election performance. Professor Stewart has been recognized at MIT for his undergraduate teaching, being named to the second class of MacVicar Fellows in 1994, awarded the Baker Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and the recipient of the Class of 1960 Fellowship. Since 1992, he has served as Housemaster of McCormick Hall, along with his spouse, Kathryn M. Hess. Professor Stewart received his B.A. in political science from Emory University, and S.M. and Ph.D. from Stanford University.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Trump Triumphant

 

President Trump and America have withstood so much organized opposition, just this year to date. And yet, he and we still stand. Her is the list so far for 2020: the Chinese Communist Party plague, Russia and our good friends the Saudis crashing the global oil market, and clearly organized destruction by arson, smashing, and large scale theft. Today, President Trump stood smiling in the Rose Garden telling the good news for America, and the very bad news for the Democrat-Media complex, that jobs are coming back much faster than the “experts” expected. Small business owners had cause to smile, as well, because the president signed a one-page law improving the Paycheck Protection Program; see the bottom of this post for the full text.

A series of unfortunate events:

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A former MI6 head is pointing to a paper that has made the rounds a bit, sort of like 007 trying to escape a secret lair, and emerging into the light. The Jerusalem Post gives a good account: A former head of the British intelligence agency MI6 has said that he believes the COVID-19 virus […]

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard open with commentary on the George Floyd tragedy and K-12 education’s role in addressing racial injustice. Then, they are joined by Jeffrey Riley, the Massachusetts Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education, to talk about the unprecedented challenges of COVID-19. Commissioner Riley walks them through the remote learning guidance he issued, the timeline since the closures in March, and efforts to meet financial and technological obstacles in different parts of the state. He discusses work to acclimate teachers to online learning platforms, and options for re-opening in the fall. He also shares an innovative program that he launched in Lawrence that is now available in other parts of the state to respond to the growing demand for vocational education. Lastly, they delve into how to improve the Boston Public Schools, the subject of a recent audit warning about graduation rates, facilities, and academic performance, with 30 of the district’s schools ranking in the bottom 10 percent statewide.

Story of the Week: Cara and Gerard reflect on the George Floyd murder, police brutality, and racial injustice across America, and the important role of school leaders and teachers in facilitating constructive dialogue. How can education policymaking help with this ongoing crisis? They discuss the benefits of increasing access to high-quality educational opportunities and early literacy programs; engaging in conversations about our broken criminal justice system; improving the preparation of police officer candidates; and ensuring that people of all races feel empowered to speak up in support of human dignity and against injustice.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Chris Sununu’s Stay at Home Hypocrisy in New Hampshire

 
Gov. Chris Sununu (R-NH) looting the ice cream aisle in April

I wrote a piece for National Review on New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu’s hypocritical application of his stay-at-home order here in the “Live Free or Die” state:

Last Friday, Sununu extended his stay-at-home order for a third time, guaranteeing more people will lose their jobs. He also threatened legal action against Riverside Speedway and Adventure Park in Groveton, N.H., forcing the track to remain closed. His stay-at-home order carries a potential $20,000 fine for businesses that defy him and possible arrest and criminal prosecution for anyone else failing to follow the various micromanaged edicts he has issued. (You can use equipment at the gym if you pay for a personal trainer to follow you around, but not on your own. Out-of-staters must quarantine for 14 days before staying in a hotel. Hair-cutting is OK, but dye jobs are not. Golf-course employees must wear masks at all times even when eating lunch alone in a break room. Etc.)