Tag: court

Member Post

 

I think it would be a tremendously bad policy decision to attempt to pack the courts. That doesnt mean that democrats will be deterred from doing it. Democrats seem unable to form a long term political strategy beyond perceived short term political needs. They always seem to be living in the moment – endorsing whatever […]

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“Judge of the Decade”, the Honorable Michael Warren (6th Circuit Court, Oakland County, MI) Author & Co-Creator of the Patriot Week Foundation https://www.patriotweek.org/ discusses the contentious and history-making Trump nomination to the Supreme Court of the United States. From a Constitutional perspective, can Democrats go through with their threats to “pack the court”? How and when did SCOTUS become so politicized? If Trump wins reelection, will a second term see a 7-2 Conservative court and how would that impact the country?

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard continue coverage of COVID-19’s impact on K-12 education, joined by Kimberly Robinson, Professor at the University of Virginia School of Law and the Curry School of Education. Kimberly discusses her new book, A Federal Right to Education: Fundamental Questions for Our Democracy, and the need for states to establish a “floor of opportunity” to ensure educational equity. She explores models of equity, including funding disparities, achievement gaps, and participation in democracy; and reviews the history of educational equity cases and the relative effectiveness of federal as opposed to state courts as an avenue of reform. She shares analysis of a recent United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit ruling that set a new precedent for its recognition of a right to a basic minimum education, under the U.S. Constitution, for Detroit students, after that school district was experiencing teacher shortages, out-of-date learning materials, and poor sanitary conditions. Lastly, she describes the inspiration for her work: her parents’ involvement in the Civil Rights movement, and the sacrifices they made for better educational opportunities.

Stories of the Week: New guidance from the U.S. Department of Education expanding federal aid through the CARES Act to private schools struggling to meet new pandemic-related challenges has drawn criticism from public school trade associations. American colleges and universities’ growing dependence on the increased revenue from international students, who pay larger tuitions than domestic students, has some concerned about the financial impact, especially in the COVID-19 era, on the ability to recruit skilled and talented applicants from abroad.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see not all Democrats have lost their minds after Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet begs 2020 candidates not to campaign on expanding the Supreme Court. They also hammer Beto O’Rourke and other liberals for using the New Zealand mosque massacre to push a ban on the AR-15. And they defend Chelsea Clinton after progressives accuse her of facilitating the New Zealand massacre with her critique of Rep. Ilhan Omar. 

Member Post

 

We are now living in the post-Kavanaugh confirmation hearing era. The hard left gallery of rogues – Democrat senators, including “Spartacus” and that Hawaiian man-hater– lost the battle they so desperately and shamelessly waged. What will be the fall-out? Hopefully, Republicans will hang onto the House in the midterms, though that still remains a long […]

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Here is a headline that epitomizes the times in which we are living: “The Ninth Circuit Just Allowed Children To Sue Trump Over Global Warming.” When you see a headline like that, all you can do is shake your head in exasperation and scream out into the ether, “Of course it did!” Because it’s the […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America begin by discussing the interesting circumstances surrounding the discovery of Tom Brady’s stolen Superbowl jersey, but then get to the real news. They are excited to see Neil Gorsuch begin his Supreme Court confirmation hearings. They also react to the heads of the FBI and NSA say they have no evidence suggesting Pres. Obama ordered surveillance on Trump Tower. And they shake their heads as only 43 percent of Americans can name one Supreme Court justice.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are thrilled to see Tom Price confirmed as Secretary of Health and Human Services. They also discuss the numerous problems with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling on the Trump immigration order. And they slam CNN’s Chris Cuomo for asserting that accusing a journalist of fake news is the equivalent of using the N word.

Member Post

 

now you enforce it! I don’t know who said it originally, and I know I mangled it, but the meaning is clear. Question—isn’t this ruling unconstitutional? If so, the President is within his rights to ignore it, or ‘nullify’ it, correct? I fear this situation is going to come to bloodshed. The question is, whose […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer President Trump’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch for the U.S. Supreme Court. They also get a kick out of flailing liberals showing up to protest the Supreme Court nomination with fill-in-the-blank signs so they could protest anyone who was chosen. And they fully support the push from Vox to cancel the Oscars, although their reasons are somewhat different than those offered by Vox.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are very encouraged by the final two names President Trump is reportedly considering for the Supreme Court vacancy. They also cringe as Trump once again insists he lost the popular vote only through rampant voter fraud by illegal aliens. And they slam Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel for claiming a lack of federal assistance is to blame for the huge number of murders in his city.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see Donald Trump’s alleged Supreme Court short list coming down to mostly encouraging names. They also rip the right for its insane romance with Julian Assange, with Trump suggesting Assange is trustworthy and Sarah Palin even apologizing to Assange for condemning his publishing her own hacked emails years ago. And they groan as Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer vows to stall at least eight Trump cabinet nominees.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America prepare for Thanksgiving by each listing three things they’re politically thankful for this year.

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club podcast for October 18, 2016 it’s the Rigged Podcast edition of the show. We are thrilled to have the chance this week to talk matters philosophical and transcendent (and Supreme Court) during our exclusive interview with Emily Bazelon of the New York Times Magazine and the Slate Political Gabfest who joins us again at HLC.

The Trump Train continues to clatter down the tracks and the days of rigorous speeches and focused message in late August and early September that brought the race to parity seems to be a thing of the past. Trump continues to draw tens of thousands but The Donald’s focus seems to be on polls and process. We discuss this and we also discuss a powerful piece by Hoover Institution historian and overall conservative big cheese Victor Davis Hanson – in The National Review no less – arguing the case for conservatives to vote for Trump. (We thought that was a no-brainer long ago).

Abortion and Good Faith

 

shutterstock_133423673-e1444998785546As previously discussed at Ricochet, there have been several recent federal court decisions regarding the constitutionality of new laws that require abortionists to gain admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. One of these cases is wending its way to the Supreme Court and we’re likely to see a decision on it next year.

I’ve generally been skeptical of this legislation, as the genuine health and safety concerns seemed to take a back seat to finding new means of restricting abortion. Now, I want abortion to be more restricted than it is because I think abortion-on-demand-for-any-reason-at-any-time is monstrous, but I also have a gut feeling that these laws were masking that (legitimate) motivation behind a screen of health concerns. On the other hand, I would never have imagined that it was possible for something like Kermit Gosnell’s clinic to exist, and I also assume that any stance taken by Planned Parenthood is mendacious and wicked until proven otherwise, so there was that to account for.

With all this in mind, I decided to read the most recent of these decisions, this one regarding a small part of an anti-abortion law passed in Wisconsin in the wake of the Gosnell case. The relevant portions under review concerned the passage that required abortion providers to gain “admitting privileges in a hospital within 30 miles of the location where the abortion is to be performed” within two days of the law’s passage. The process for gaining admitting privileges is lengthy and capricious, and the two days in question were a Saturday and Sunday. The timing was so egregious that the court put a unanimous injunction against this particular provision’s enforcement in order to give abortionists time to meet the new requirement. This case then reviewed whether the injunction should be lifted or made permanent. The majority’s decision by Judge Richard Posner argued that it should be permanent, while Judge Daniel Manion dissented.

Member Post

 

Like an unflappable beachcomber scouring the sands with a metal detector and hoping for a big find, the Supreme Court has unearthed a hitherto deeply buried constitutional right to same-sex marriage. And thus, with the imperious waving of a judicial wand, the debate has been settled. Same-sex marriage is now the law of the land […]

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