Tag: Constitution

Member Post

 

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three new martinis Thursday! First, they applaud the Florida State Senate for permanently removing former Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel after his horrific leadership before, during, and after the Parkland high school shooting. They also shudder as a majority of Americans favor rewriting the first amendment and […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Attorney General Barr Speaks up for Religious Liberty

 

AG BarrOn Friday, 12 October 2019, Attorney General Barr spoke at Notre Dame Law School. Notre Dame Law School advertises itself as America’s oldest Roman Catholic law school:

At the nation’s oldest Roman Catholic law school, students of diverse backgrounds are encouraged to broaden their social, spiritual, and personal lives while honing their intellectual and professional skills to serve the good of all.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Cow Flatulence No Longer a Laughing Matter

 

We all giggled, guffawed, or groaned at the Green New Deal’s line about cow flatulence causing the end of the world. We wiped up the coffee we had spewed over our phone or keyboard. Then we went about our lives as if this was not a clear and present danger.

Well, the dairy farmers of Wisconsin, the state built on (dairy cow) cheese and beer, are not laughing now. No farmer across this country should be in anything but full fight mode now. There is no flight option. John Hinderaker of PowerLine Blog has the story [emphasis added]:

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Hillsdale College Defends the Constitution and the Second Amendment

 

Hillsdale is a remarkable college in Michigan that was established in 1844. More of its students went to join up for the Civil War than any other western school. And it is known for offering a Classical education and teaching the Constitution. It also takes no money from the Federal government. And is highly celebrated for its requirements and high standards.

More

Member Post

 

Yesterday marked Constitution Day. A day which is a dual observance: It celebrates both the day that the United States Constitution was adopted, as well as honors naturalized citizens of our country. Prior to 2004, the day was known as Citizenship Day. Its name was changed due to an amendment attached to a spending bill by Sen. Robert […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Constitution Day

 

Today, September 17, 2019, is the 232nd anniversary of the signing of the United States Constitution at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. In honor of that great document, and our great nation, here is the text of the Constitution. The amazing thing is that it can be read in one sitting.

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
(more…)

More

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Today is Constitution Day and Citizenship Day. It’s observed each year on September 17 to commemorate the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787, and recognize all who have become citizens (I learned this from reading the new Ricochet post Colors of the Constitution by Clifford A. Brown @cliffordbrown). I think it’s a good […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. People Have the Power, Not Walmart CEO Doug McMillon

 

WalmartRedGreenAnyone who values the Constitution, let alone gun ownership and the right to effective self-defense, will immediately punish Walmart, shifting all purchases to:

  • Dollar stores
  • Grocery stores
  • Hardware stores
  • Auto part stores
  • Even Amazon. Yes, Amazon is also hostile, but this is allying with Soviet Russia to crush Nazi Germany.

We cannot afford to wait and see if “Walmart’s virtue signal” in its announcement that it will “stop selling ‘short-barrel rifle ammunition,'” will somehow organically, cosmically balance out in our favor. Things can and will get much worse unless Walmart is made an example of, for all corporations that depend on normal Americans’ dollars for their business success.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Victory for Christian Filmmakers Is a Win for Everyone

 

With nearly seven in 10 American adults worried about cultural and political threats to free speech, good news may be closer than you think. In fact, a recent court decision provides hope that free speech protections are trending upward, charting the course for future victories for all Americans.

Free speech was at the very center of Telescope Media Group v. Lucero. The case challenged the state’s attempt to force Christian filmmakers—with the threat of fines and jail time—to promote messages that violate their faith. On August 23, a three-judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit ruled 2-1 in favor of the filmmakers, overturning a lower court’s decision and giving that court a roadmap for how this case should move forward.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. More Rats! And Racism?

 

RatsThe left has settled on the election strategy of screaming “racist, racist, racist” at President Trump and any who dare show any support for him. It need not be true if it works, as Senator Harry Reid shamelessly admitted after smearing Mitt Romney into defeat. Yelling “that’s racist!” is also a defensive move by Democrats, fearful of President Trump showing they no longer have a monopoly on peoples’ votes based on skin color. President Trump can win bigly in the 2020 election, and put his tormentors on the back foot now, if he simply goes on offense, keeping his promises made in on Trump’s New Deal for Black America. In so doing, he can make a substantial positive difference in the lives of forgotten and exploited Americans, cleaning up the rats, and the dirty rotten rats in local and state governments.

Rats and Dirty Rotten Rats

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QOTD: Calvin Coolidge and the Declaration of Independence

 

Calvin Coolidge, born on July 4, 1872, was known as “Silent Cal,” but wasn’t afraid to speak out about his Conservative values. He clearly rejected the revisionist approach to the Declaration of Independence and demonstrated his beliefs in an exemplary way. In fact, he believed that changing the meaning of the Declaration was not progress, but a step backward in our understanding of the Founders, and the values that we hold.

How unfortunate that the Progressives of today don’t realize they are trying to take us back to more primitive, tribal times when people insisted they were superior to others, based on their intellect, education and the color of their skin. They clearly do not believe that we are created equal (since Conservatives are a different species), that the wishes of the governed should direct the work of the government (since the government knows best), and the more government, the better (which ensures the massive growth of the administrative state). After all, the government and its elites are quite prepared to tell us how to do everything: how to live our lives, what to invest in, and what to believe.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Patrick Deneen’s Delusions

 

In the Wall Street Journal’s most recent “Weekend Interview” feature, columnist William McGurn spoke to Professor Patrick Deneen, a political theorist at Notre Dame, about his influential 2018 book Why Liberalism Has Failed. McGurn, himself a Notre Dame graduate, takes Deneen to task for selling the Founders “short” by supposedly exposing their weak moral and social foundations in his book. “Liberalism has failed,” Deneen provocatively claims, “not because it fell short, but because it was true to itself. It has failed because it has succeeded.”

In Deneen’s view basic liberalism necessarily goes astray because it treats the atomistic individual, shorn from his or her social and religious context, solely as a rights-bearing entity. Deneen thus attacks the Framers worldview with its strong protections of individual rights, free and fair elections, and an independent judiciary. Writing even before Trump was elected, Deneen argues that it is “evident to all that the political system is broken and social fabric is fraying, particularly as a growing gap between wealthy haves and left-behind have-nots increases, a hostile divide widens between faithful and secular peoples, and deep disagreement persists over America’s role in the world.”

More

Member Post

 

Myron Magnet joins Brian Anderson to discuss his new book, Clarence Thomas and the Lost Constitution. Magnet contends that Justice Thomas’s originalist jurisprudence offers a path forward for recovering our nation’s “lost Constitution” and restoring America as a free, self-governing nation made up of self-reliant citizens. More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: The First Cabinet

 

https://s3.amazonaws.com/mtv-main-assets/files/pages/mv_byreneecomet.jpgThe President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to Grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offences against the United States, except in Cases of Impeachment.

He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.

More

Member Post

 

You get the political genie arising from the very bottle of ink with which the Constitution was scribed. You get three wishes consistent with the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, and you get them forever if you want, what would they be? What are the two or three things that […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: State of the Union

 

File:Federal Hall 2011 New York City.jpg“He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient;” — U.S. Constitution, Article II, Section 3

President George Washington delivered the first State of the Union address to Congress on 8 January 1790. Congress was then meeting in Federal Hall, in New York City. Our first president addressed themes that we will hear President Donald Trump address, on 5 February 2019, the new date Speaker Pelosi invites him to take the floor of the House:

More

Member Post

 

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America get a kick out of CNN commentator Areva Martin telling radio host David Webb his success is a result of white privilege – until Webb tells her he is black. They’re also aghast as 59 percent of registered voters support a 70 percent marginal […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

I read this headline, Justice Department asks Supreme Court to allow… and something just seems wrong to me: Regardless of the issue. More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see some liberals embracing the conclusion that the executive branch – and the presidency in particular – has accumulated far more power than our founders intended. They just wonder whether lefties will still have these concerns once one of their own […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Originalism in Theology and Law: Venerating Authoritative Texts

 

Ever since Marvin Olasky quoted SCOTX Justice Nathan Hecht on Harriet Miers’ originalism, I’ve been aware that there are connections between originalism in law and religion. I’ve done a bit of writing on the subject, including a failed unpublished essay and a draft of a chapter in a book that isn’t published either. Unlike the essay, the book is not a failed project; it’s just new and unfinished.

Mark Eckel, and I have agreed to be co-editors. Inshallah, we’ll put together our own chapters, the introduction chapter, and a proposal and get things underway sometime next year with a call for proposals from other possible authors. My finished chapter uncovers an important insight: Originalism in biblical theology is a bit more of an intentionalism, and originalism in American Constitutional law is a textualism, and there’s a reason for that difference.

More