Tag: Conservatism

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It’s been over two weeks since election night. But many of us are still wondering how to interpret the results and what those results will mean for the conservative movement. I was surprised t0 read that Stephen Moore, a supply sider and free trader, is open to a trillion dollar “stimulus” package, even though he […]

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So, the American electorate actually went ahead and voted to make Donald J. Trump the next president of the United States. Ever since Trump announced his candidacy and was (shockingly, to me) taken seriously by influential “conservative” media figures, I’d been hoping against hope that this result would not actually come to pass. Of course, […]

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Now that the election is finally over, the tough job of paving the future of America has begun. But how much of president-elect Trump’s stated goals are mere lip-service to his base, and how much could become actual policy? Hosts John Hart and Ellen Carmichael weigh in on the obstacles the new administration will have to hurdle, and what it means for the national Conservative movement going forward.

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I have a personal hope to see African Americans embrace conservative ideas on a large scale in my lifetime. As long as i’ve been alive, people have said that African Americans vote Democrat and there’s no changing it. I’m not so sure. I’m from Maryland and I grew up in Prince George’s County. To anyone not […]

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An acquaintance of my family is running for office this year. I only knew him as a kid, so can’t verify much other than that he has long operated a respectable business and has taken good care of his family. But I heard he’s running as a conservative Democrat and so looked up his platform […]

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I am wondering what is considered Conservatism now-a-days? I know that there are many that feel that the Republican party no longer represents (especially after nominating Trump) true conservative ideals. Is this true to you (anyone who reads this)? Read More View Post

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Evan McMullin – For Many Of Us, Why in the World Not?

 

Evan McMullin@dickfrombrooklyn (oh, dear…or was it @ctlaw? I had already had a few beers) and I were talking with Rob Long last night at the meetup, and I was lamenting that there isn’t more discussion on the site about Evan McMullin. Today, I actually used the Ricochet search function (something I don’t usually do, though I am a champion Googler) and found that, in fact, there have been a couple of posts. Anyway, last night, Rob’s response to my lamentation was: “Write something!”

OK.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. George Will, The GOP, And Conservatism

 

George Will has a new piece at NRO about the relationship between the conservative movement and the Republican party. I’d like to focus on his second to last paragraph in which he writes,

The beginning of conservative wisdom is recognition that there is an end to everything: Nothing lasts. If Trump wins, the GOP ends as a vehicle for conservatism. And a political idea without a political party is an orphan in an indifferent world.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Confessions of a Reluctant Trumper

 

despairHaving exuberantly joined the Communist Party of the United States in 1925, Whittaker Chambers became dismayed both with Stalin’s show trials and purges as well as with the hideous realities of collectivism before finally breaking faith in 1938. “I know that I’m leaving the winning side for the losing side,” he wrote of his decision to join with the West, to which he would later add, in a letter to his friend Ralph de Toledano:

It’s the realization … that this side is in its plight because of its stupidity, and cannot get out it because of its stupidity, and cannot help anybody … because of its stupidity — it’s that that’s killing us. And the stupidity of well-meaning friends is far more destructive than the malicious mischief of outright enemies. When you have to face the fact that they cannot, simply are unable, to act like grownups, then you know that it’s hopeless and all that we have tried to do is for nothing.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Where Can We Find Knowledge?

 

shutterstock_170848478During one of Ricochet’s big Same Sex Marriage debates during the run-up to Obergefell, @jamesofengland said this:

I think I’ve been clear that I don’t share Augustine’s confidence in specific bad outcomes […] I tend to think of Burke and Hayek as telling basically the same story, a story that I’ve been boringly obsessive about for decades now (before law, I took theology up to a Master’s degree, spending quite a lot of that time dealing with Derrida and Pseudodionysus, who I also believe to be in the same epistemically humble tradition). […] It’d be good to shift the conversation in that direction, because if the subject isn’t [Same Sex Marriage], but Hayek, I’ll have [another Ricochet gentleman] on my side, along with [a Ricochet lady] and [a third Ricochet gentleman]. I don’t know how much Augustine really backs that side, but I think [another Ricochet lady] has a higher epistemology (a sense that we can know more about the world than Hayek thought), meaning that we could pretty completely reshuffle the teams.

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Presented here, a statement for the consideration of the forum, without any argument for or against on my part, other than to point out that serious intellectuals are beginning to see the world his way, while it seems that the defense of Conservatism is left to less scholarly opinion makers and policy wonks. Here is […]

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http://city-journal.org/html/lone-star-quartet-14727.html There is a great piece today in the City Journal written by Aaron Renn entitled “Lone Star Quartet” (link provided). It takes a look at the successes and shortcomings of the four major metropolitan areas in Texas: Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin. Aside from being an interesting read in general, this piece is […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Fundamental Transformation … of the Tax Code

 

I’m writing this at the inspiration of @jamielockett in the interest of demonstrating that we conservatives can and do say “yes.” Some of us may have already broached the subject of whether or not we’re actually conservatives, but whatever, Mr. Lockett. ;)

So, how do we on the Right not merely say “no”? I began discussing the topic here, but I’ve since had the opportunity to think about just what sort of reforms we can advocate which are not merely a return to the past but a way forward into the future; a revolution if you will that might permanently change the game.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. No Is Not Enough

 
shutterstock_243211624
Insufficient.

Let me now state what seems to me the decisive objection to any conservatism which deserves to be called such. It is that by its very nature it cannot offer an alternative to the direction in which we are moving. It may succeed by its resistance to current tendencies in slowing down undesirable developments, but, since it does not indicate another direction, it cannot prevent their continuance. It has, for this reason, invariably been the fate of conservatism to be dragged along a path not of its own choosing. — F.A. Hayek

I come to praise conservatism, not to bury it. For as much as I tussle with my fellow conservatives on Ricochet, as a conservative libertarian, I consider myself a fellow traveler and a member of the tribe.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. The Abandonment of Conservative Principle

 

On Laura Ingraham’s website, Lifezette, Edmund Kozack laments the “Constitution worship” of those opposing the populist movement within the GOP:

The Constitution worship of those like Shapiro and Sen. Ted Cruz reveals that the mainstream conservative movement has largely forgotten the principle of imperfectability. The Constitution alone cannot guarantee some sort of political utopia. Man is fallen — a city on a shining hill cannot be guaranteed by a mere piece of paper. The fact that within a decade of the documents’ adoption the government was already trying to subvert it should be a clear indication of that reality.

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There are many reasons the Right is losing the culture war and one of them is risk aversion. When one hears of “helicopter parenting”, it is often in reference to physical risks. Don’t eat that snack that touched the floor — it could make you sick! Don’t ride your bike through the woods — you […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. The Best Books to Create Young Conservatives

 

shutterstock_94325839A new USA Today poll shows Trump losing the under-35 vote to Clinton by 36 percent. On the one hand, this may demonstrate that young voters see Trump more clearly than others. It may also be a combination of naïve idealists “feeling the Bern,” a few who actually think a Hillary Clinton administration would be good for the country, and probably even more who — like me — are revolted by the Donald. Nonetheless, if it’s true that a first vote is a defining vote, this bodes ill for those of us who yearn for a real conservative alternative and who wish that our young people could learn to embrace conservative principles.

One of this year’s lessons is that older conservatives must become missionaries to the young on behalf of the cause of limited government, ordered liberty, economic and civil freedom, free markets, a shared moral code, and a strong role for America in the world (backed up by a strong military). All of which brings me to my topic: The books that young Americans should be reading to introduce them to conservative thought and principles, or, even better, to solidify the beliefs of those naturally inclined toward conservatism.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. To Save Conservatism

 

shutterstock_461975242If one believes conservatism is the only cure for what ails the nation, then 2016 is a bleak year. We have before us a choice of a dedicated leftist whose entire public life has been dedicated to the destruction of our republic (and replacing it with yet another European-styel socialist welfare state), or a guy who can be charitably described as “not a conservative.” Because Hillary Clinton is such a well known statist and a threat to our way of life, it would seem obvious that the only viable option for conservatives would be to oppose her with everything they have. Under any normal set of circumstances that would be exactly the right course of action. Indeed, many have claimed that it’s so obviously correct that there can be no other argument. Ben Shapiro, however, takes a different view:

That brings us to the real reason to oppose Trump’s candidacy: the attempt to turn the conservative movement into a nationalist populist one, complete with shilling for Trump’s incomprehensible decisions and statements. If you believe that the only solution to America’s problems is true conservatism, your greatest fear is not a Hillary presidency: It’s the perversion of the conservative movement itself, the corruption of conservatism in favor of power. Hillary Clinton’s presidency does not snuff out conservatism, even though it provides a serious danger to the republic. Trump’s presidency does.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

The Journal of American Greatness, or as we also know it, the PIT, has now reached its 12th volume. I refer you to pages 890 et seq. for one of the more revealing discussions of what’s going on with the Republican party, its electorate, & its political principles. It is fully deserving of your attention, […]

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What if the delegate revolt against trump succeeds. The delegates vote and trump receives an incredibly small margin of the delegate votes and instead Senator Jefferson Sessions of Alabama is voted in by the margin of 55% as the nominee. How would you feel? Is his nomination good for the party and with independents? Would […]

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