Tag: Conservatism

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I’d be interested to hear anyone’s thoughts about this. By virtue of their market dominance and the competitive advantages of large networks, the tech giants are able to manage the flow of news and information, censoring, throttling, and editorializing as they wish. They can do this transparently or invisibly, using increasingly sophisticated algorithms coupled with […]

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There seems to be some misunderstanding that there will there be a 6-3 conservative majority on the Supreme Court after Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed. John Roberts is not conservative in any meaningful judicial sense, neither interpreting laws based on their original public meaning (originalism) nor through some conservative view. And so, while there will […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Politics Is Destroying Your Soul

 

A friend shared this Huffington Post story with me this morning. Here is the opening paragraph:

I am a 40-something attorney and mother who lives in a quiet neighborhood with a yard and a garage full of scooters and soccer balls. I often walk with my children to get ice cream and spend weekends hiking through a national park. I am not the type of person who would normally consider becoming a Satanist, but these are not normal times.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. An Open Letter to the Woke Left

 

To my “woke” fellow Americans:

As a forty-something conservative woman, I think you are leading the country to disaster with your rigid codes of conduct, your rejection of the US and its values, and the divisions you inflame among American citizens. Why should you listen to me? For what it’s worth, I have a perspective broadened by living overseas. I’ve witnessed the contrasts in living conditions between the US and other parts of the world. I know something of the gulf in worldviews that results, outside the West, in truly culturally acceptable favoritism and inequality.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Losing the Culture

 

Granville, Ohio, is a pleasant place — tucked among the Appalachian foothills of east-central Ohio, with all the old trees and old buildings an old soul could possibly love. Granville is a college town. Its residents are healthy and wealthy and comfortable with their lives. All this means, naturally, that Granville is a Democratic stronghold.

It’s a little odd, of course, that the Denison women’s studies professor comes home, every day, to her little Greek Revival cottage built by a misogynist pig and spends her evenings toying with recipes in the same kitchen where, a century earlier, a beleaguered woman stood barefoot and pregnant, but . . . that’s the oddity of America in 2020. Those who slander the country’s patrimony with the most vehemence happen to be its custodians.

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On this guest episode of the Resistance Library Podcast Sam invites Jeremy Carl onto the show. Jeremy Carl is a Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute and a writer at The American Mind, as well as a number of other publications. He joined Sam to discuss the future of a fighting conservatism and the deep […]

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Radio Liberty does an excellent daily program called Весь эфир, which covers a variety of contemporary and historical topics, political and in the arts. Today they posted a very interesting podcast from 20 years ago about William F. Buckley Jr., discussing his ideas, legacy, and life with a variety of American and Russian thinkers (as […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Goldberg v. Klavan

 

I’d like to say that I’ve been dying for a Goldberg/Klavan (of the Andrew variety) long-form podcast for almost three years, all about Trump. I don’t want a “debate,” despite the intentionally incendiary (or at least flammable . . . or at the very least dyspeptic) title. I’d like to hear two sides of a divide discuss their differences because I firmly believe most conservatives aren’t Trump purists or Trump haters.

Perhaps I am an anomaly. Nonetheless, for almost four years now I’ve scratched my head trying to understand one side of the conservative movement that I have always respected (and still respect). I imagine the feeling is mutual.

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Here are my reflections on Sir Roger, published today in The Bulwark. They focus on his remarkable work and legacy in Central Europe. Preview Open

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Real conservatism is about the things we love, not reacting to what makes us afraid. Conservatives need to break the false narrative that we are determined by nostalgia and a hatred of change. Willam F. Buckley, the ever fading icon of the American right, famously wrote of Conservatism that “It stands athwart history, yelling Stop, […]

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This is something I’ve been thinking about for awhile, but that — because I know myself pretty well — I suspect I will never get around to doing. I’m a pretty darn good robotics and industrial automation programmer, but I’m not particularly good at doing web sites, as my own would demonstrate: though there are […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. You Need to Be Purged

 

Yes, you! You are corrupting and destroying conservatism, and need to go!

It seems the one thing conservatives can agree on is that we need purge the conservative movement of the other side. Trump supporters and opponents want to eliminate the opposing side for betraying conservative principles. Social Cons don’t trust the libertarians / squishy urban fiscal cons, while they see the social cons as backward theocrats. Race issues have one side calling the other either neo-Confederate racists or delusional egalitarians living in denial of reality. There are also conservatives who believe all Muslims are evil – these conservatives believe their opponents are dhimmis taken in by deception and, in turn, people condemn them as bigots willing to toss every Muslim in the same box as ISIS. Pro-police or anti-police? Immigration skeptic or proponent? Neocon or paleocon?

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. To Answer the Challenge of MBD

 

Michael Brendan Dougherty posed a challenge on Twitter:

I objected to his choice of target as I think French is a good ally and we should be grateful for what he’s done. But I’d like to see one critic engage Sohrab Ahmari’s point about how liberal principles, divorced from a pre-liberal inheritance, resolve disputes in one direction. (@michaelbd)

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Left’s Shabby Vision

 

I think we conservatives sometimes feel inadequate, as if we lack the joy and enthusiasm that the left seems to bring to its various causes. It’s hard, after all, to wax rhapsodically about fiscal responsibility, deregulation, federalism, and other principles that distinguish conservative philosophy from the ever-expanding universe of leftist passions and causes. We don’t do sit-ins. We don’t chant. Conservatism is, well, conservative, and just not very exciting.

But if you scratch the surface, if you look beyond superficial enthusiasm and consider the worldviews that truly motivate left and right, you discover something interesting and, I think, counter-intuitive. You discover that it is conservatism that is optimistic, positive, enthusiastic, innovative, and forward-looking — in short, hopeful — and the left that is, overwhelmingly, motivated by a grim, desperate, fearful, and impoverished view of both humanity and our prospects.

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In her latest podcast, D.C. McAllister (@dcmcallister) speaks of her recent experiences on Twitter and calls for conservatives to carry on the fight in the culture war. Conservatives must never back down against the left’s relentless assault on marriage, the family, religion, and other traditional institutions that are the bedrock of America’s greatness. Preview Open

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley’s decision to not run in 2020 but ask if his announcement was really necessary since very few Americans have any idea who he is. They also take a deep breath of fresh air as Texas Rep. Dan Crenshaw gives a clear and calm defense of conservative principles that is often missing from our public dialogue. And Jim notes the Clinton era ends in a whimper as Hillary officially states that she will not run for president in 2020.

Art Tavana is a conservative, libertarian columnist at Playboy and contributor at National Review. An Armenian refugee from Iran, Art talks about how Michael J. Fox as Alex P. Keaton on Family Ties indoctrinated him as a conservative early in life and why being a conservative writing for Playboy is only okay because he’s a person of color and not a white MAGA bro. He and Bridget discuss the strange fad of corporations caving to the mob and apologizing every time someone gets “offended”, his perspective on gratitude as an immigrant living in America, the freedom of having nothing to lose, and why they both hate being branded as activists. The conversation ranges from mourning the death of contrarians, to dissecting why populism needs to go, to predicting that our totalitarian leader is going to come from the left, to why you shouldn’t ever join a group to solve your problems. Finally, don’t miss Art’s explanation of why Atlas Shrugged is the most feminist thing he’s ever read.

For questions, comments or topic requests contact us at: walkinswelcomequestions@gmail.com

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So I’m in this long-term, low-grade struggle to understand why/when conservatives began to view libertarianism with such suspicion and disdain, and I just came across the below from Ricochet’s favorite libertarian interloper. It sounds very conservative (to me), but it also sounds very libertarian. He’s arguing against throwing money (private money, in this case, but could […]

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It’s nice to imagine that the typical progressive has one issue about which he or she is passionate, one issue and one specific, clearly defined objective. If that were the case, we could discuss the merits of pursuing that objective. We could talk about the likely costs and the likely benefits, and maybe even reach […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Conservatism: An Abstract Philosophy or a Mode of Governance?

 

There is no question that the rise of Donald Trump has created a schism on the right. I’ve certainly had my run-ins with folks here on Ricochet, most notably @garyrobbins and @georgetownsend. While I vehemently disagree with these gentlemen on a lot of things, arguing with them has had its benefits, namely that they have pushed me to constantly refine, redefine and clarify my beliefs.

In a recent lengthy back-and-forth they provided me with this question on the state of things in the post-Reagan era: Is Conservatism just an abstract utopian philosophy, the inverse of theoretical Communism, or is it an actual and practical mode of governing?