Tag: Congress

Increased Security Around The Capitol – What It Means

 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi conducted a surreal news conference today. While defending the continued presence of nearly 10,000 Army National Guard troops in the nation’s capitol, she called for more funding to help protect Members of Congress “from the enemy within.”

What?

That brought back McCarthyite statements and tactics from the 1950’s (and a certain 1994 movie). Then again, McCarthyism (Joseph, not the “Kevin” variety) has been on full display by Democrats for several weeks now. But since American history is no longer taught in schools, it seems, few of any know the sordid tale of the late US Sen. Joseph McCarthy (R-WI), and his “Army-McCarthy” hearings. It was a dark episode in modern American history, but a turning point.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Federalist Senior Editor Chris Bedford and Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky discuss the Senate’s upcoming impeachment trial and what it means for the future of the GOP.

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This Article Was Originally Published on 10/3/2020   The United States Senate, said to be the world’s greatest deliberative body, is under attack. This institution drafted by our founders in 1787 is purposefully designed as a slower-moving organization which protects the rights of the minority party and allows unlimited debate. The U.S. House is said […]

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Gene Marks, President of the Marks Group PC and writer for outlets like The Guardian and The Hill, joins Carol Roth to discuss the state of small business coming out of 2020 into 2021. Gene and Carol break down Trump’s business legacy and what might be in store in the new administration. Plus, some great tax tips and breaks of which you may not be aware. 

Plus, a “Now You Know” on how to hack getting on the train at Penn Station.

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I promised I would share an op-ed I co-authored with a liberal Democratic friend, Rob Fersh, on the important – some would say, urgent – need to restore an important remnant of our social fabric; building trust and the ability to dialogue across the partisan divide. Some think it is too late. Injustices – some real, others […]

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A Few Thoughts on Today’s Capitol Protest

 

The US Capitol is the centerpiece, even the capstone, of my 40 career in and around politics and advocacy, and much more. It is where I met Adrienne and where every member of my family has spent time – both my sons were Senate pages, and one would serve as a doorkeeper and House staff assistant. I consider being Secretary of the Senate the greatest honor of my years in public service and politics. I love the Article I branch of our Republic.

I hate what happened today, for all the reasons you do, even though much of it appeared peaceful. But I have a few thoughts to share. They may surprise.
 
First, as a former journalist: take nothing you read, watched, or heard via corporate media today at face value. I have long learned that much early reporting is wrong. Worse, much of the media has been pining for years for an event like this; something to prove that “tea party” or Trump supporters are prone to violence. Some no doubt are. But let’s wait for the facts before drawing conclusions.
 
Second, while there is no excuse for violence, it is undeniably a part of our Capitol’s history. The 9 million pound cast iron dome symbolizes to the world our democracy was constructed during the Civil War; Union troops were quartered on the then-new Senate floor. One soldier had to be restrained from destroying former Senator Jefferson Davis’ (D-MS) desk (you know, the President of the Confederacy). There are bullet marks on the House floor where Puerto Rican nationalists opened fire during a vote in 1954.
 
And you can see bloodstains on the stairway leading from the House chamber along the east front downstairs, the result of a fatal gunshot wound. in 1889, a Louisville Courier reporter, Charles Kincaid, shot former Congressman William Taulby (KY); Kincaid was never charged.
 
More recently, in 1983, the Senate had just adjourned late one November evening when a bomb exploded just off the Senate floor, courtesy of “Weathermen” extremists. The damage was extensive. Fortunately, no one was injured. Shortly after I left my job as Secretary of the Senate, two Capitol policemen were killed by a deranged killer near the offices of then-House Whip Tom DeLay. They were the first two Capitol police lost in the line of duty.
 
I mention all this to remind you that protests and violence are the unfortunate but inevitable price of free speech and the freedom of expression, movement, and association guaranteed by our Constitution. Our first such “protest” occurred in Boston Harbor. Western Pennsylvania’s “Whiskey Rebellion” was quelled by troops led by none other than President George Washington. Over 600,000 Americans lost their lives in a bloody and tragic civil war. And civil rights protests during the ’50s and ’60s were frequently violent and bloody.
 
I’m not excusing it, nor what happened in the Capitol today. It is a part of our history and the dark side of our human nature. And we have always survived, grown, learned, and moved on. . . to the next episode. We are a fallen people. We learn the hard way. We always have.
 
As I wrote on my blog just yesterday, I believe we just experienced the worst election in modern times – not the result, but because of the massive irregularities that transpired, undermining confidence in the cornerstone of our republic – free and fair elections. 
Third, and finally, I’ve heard and read enough claptrap from enough of you about how, as a Trump voter (twice), I’m responsible for what happened today. How shallow, stupid, and insulting. And so many, especially in the media, are beside themselves over this “assault on democracy” involving the US Capitol . . . the same people dismissing or ignoring over 500 violent events in more than 200 cities across the United States this summer that destroyed thousands of buildings, small businesses, and livelihoods. Spare me your crocodile tears, hypocrites. If you decry violence in the Capitol today, decry it all.

 

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  My wife and I have a saying: The next big thing. It’s is a term we use to describe something on the horizon that we need to prepare for, and it could be anything. The next big thing for us could be something important to a few key people, like an upcoming birthday or […]

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Julio Gonzales, CEO of Engineered Tax Services and national tax expert who helped advise on the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act joins Carol Roth to discuss the fallout on small business and the economy from 2020 and what to expect under a Biden administration. Julio and Carol also discuss some surprise places where individuals and business owners can turn for financial assistance, and the importance of advocating for yourself with your elected officials. 

Plus, a “Now You Know” on an underused tax break.

Join Jim and Greg as they detail the lengths China went to in its efforts to manipulate media coverage of the early days of the coronavirus outbreak. They also try to beat back the global freak out over a new strain of COVID seen in Britain. And they react to young healthy members of Congress getting vaccinated before some medical personnel and more vulnerable people.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome a six-vote win for Republican Marianette Miller-Meeks in a very tight Iowa House race. They also hammer China for covering up what it knew about COVID in the early days of the pandemic as leaked documents confirm what many suspected for months. And they slam a Detroit Free Press columnist for labeling every man, woman, and child as a potential serial killer since they could possibly spread COVID.

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A Poem to CongressWritten by Poet Laureate Howard Nemerov, and read by him to the United States Congress on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of Congress, March 2, 1989: To the Congress of the United States Entering Its Third Century, with Preface. Preview Open

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On today’s episode of COVID in 19, Scott Immergut of Ricochet and Avik Roy of FREOPP talk about Avik’s congressional testimony on data and COVID-19. Why haven’t we been better at measuring deaths in nursing homes? Why are so many lab tests coming back with false positive results, and what can we do about it?

Join Jim and Greg as they enjoy the fun ad for GOP congressional hopefuls in Texas, an ad starring Rep. Dan Crenshaw and includes skydiving and multiple movie references. They also fume over the latest revelations proving the FBI knew the Steele dossier was based on a likely Russian spy and still sought FISA warrants without ever revealing the source to the FISA court. And they get a kick out Democrats suddenly wanting Supreme Court term limits since we may soon have an actual conservative majority.

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 U.S. Sen. Ben Sasse, Republican of Nebraska, running for reelection and a Ph.D. historian, has proposed something I’ve been supporting for awhile now – repealing the 17th Amendment to the Constitution. That amendment, which provided for the direct election of US Senators, was one of several “progressive era” Constitutional amendments, adopted in short order, a […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the sanity of Attorney General Bill Barr in the face of congressional Democrats who refuse to acknowledge the violence and destruction in the streets, much less do anything about it.  They also enjoy hearing how Sen. Kamala Harris may have damaged her chance of being Joe Biden’s running mate.  And they get a kick out of the tone-deaf rich people complaining to the New York Times about having to ride out the pandemic at their summer homes in the Hamptons.

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Fox News’ most-watched program host, Tucker Carlson, took after two US Senators for advocating the abolition of Columbus Day in favor of Juneteenth – or more accurate, June 19th, 1865, when the last slaves in Texas were informed that they were free – the end of slavery, as it were, at least confederate slavery (it […]

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A True Hero’s Homecoming: Retired USAF Colonel, Congressman Sam Johnson

 

The news media condemns itself, as does our political class, once more, with their relative silence. A true American hero, whose virtue was proved in the skies of two wars, the hell on earth of the worst part of the Communist Vietnamese torture chambers, and in the halls of Congress that so often corrupt, has been called home. Retired U.S. Air Force Colonel, retired Congressman Sam Johnson went home on Wednesday, May 27, 2020, at the age of 89. There is a famous photograph of Colonel Johnson reunified with his wife, Shirley, after seven years of captivity. At the end of May 2020, I believe they were reunified a second time. We do not know what Heaven is actually like, but we may well imagine these two people embracing again in bodies not ravaged by this fallen world.

Sam married his high school sweetheart, Shirley in 1950, shortly before graduating from Southern Methodist University. They remained faithfully married for 65 years until Shirley was called home before Sam. Shirley Johnson’s obituary confessed their faith:

During Sam’s captivity, Shirley’s faith in the almighty God became more real. Prior to the POW years, she and her husband had faithfully attended church. In the blink of an eye, God was comforting her, and her faith blossomed so that she was reliant on God for the answers to her life’s tribulations. This undying faith stayed with her the remainder of her life and became a hallmark of her quiet strength, gracious manner and gentle personality. [. . .] Sam and Shirley remained inseparable, enjoying seeing new places and learning about new cultures. They found the greatest joy however, spending time with family and giving praise and thanksgiving to their Lord and Savior.

How to End Gov. Cuomo’s Tax Grab: Congress Should Enact Income Tax Reciprocity

 

You may have seen the stories over the past couple of days about New York Governor Andrew Cuomo promising to send tax bills to all the temporary workers who volunteered in or were deployed to his state to help their beleaguered hospitals and medical staff with coronavirus rescue and recovery.

There’s a way to fix that, and Congress can do it as part of their phase 4 recovery bill. Here’s how.

One of the issues I worked on a few years ago was preserving Pennsylvania’s and New Jersey’s personal income tax reciprocity agreement from 1977. Then-NJ Governor Chris Christie in 2016 infamously canceled the agreement in a budget dispute with the legislature, before reversing course. He underestimated how many people it adversely affected (some 250,000 in both states) and the political reaction to his antics.
What are reciprocity agreements? They allow citizens who live in one state while working in another to pay income taxes based on their legal residence, not where they work. If you lived, as I do, in Pennsylvania but work, as I did, in New Jersey, I paid PA (lower) income tax. Some 20 states have such agreements, most famously in the Washington, DC area between VA, MD, and DC, much to the chagrin of DC. Pennsylvania has six such agreements, including with Indiana.
So now we have Gov. Cuomo promising to send tax bills to emergency workers deployed to NY to help with coronavirus rescue efforts after he begged for (and received) such assistance. NY has no reciprocity agreements. It is not hard to figure out why.
New York City’s workforce includes tens if not hundreds of thousands of residents from neighboring Connecticut, New Jersey, and even Pennsylvania. All those workers pay New York income taxes (not to mention New York City’s infamous income or wage taxes). That’s a lot of money. A former New Jersey state treasurer once projected that the lack of a reciprocity agreement costs the state some $3 billion per year. Reciprocity agreements make a lot of sense since you’re likely using more public services (police, fire, schools, etc.) where you live than where you work.
So, if you work in NY for more than 14 days, even if you live in Virginia, you’ll get a tax bill from NY. Cuomo could ask his legislature to waive that requirement, but no, he wants your money.
If Congress insists on a phase 4 coronavirus relief/recovery package, they should, at a minimum, include personal income tax reciprocity for any emergency workers volunteering in, or deployed to another state to assist in coronavirus rescue, recovery, or mitigation. I think my friend, Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA), chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, is just the person to champion it. New York and all states who have suffered revenue losses from this are likely to get some form of a taxpayer bailout from Congress, anyway, so this is a no-brainer.
Who are these people Cuomo wants to tax? Essential workers, like doctors, nurses, emergency medical technicians, ambulance drivers, etc. You know, heroes. I wonder he’ll try to tax the estates of those workers who died from contracting coronavirus while working in New York? It would not surprise me if he did.