Tag: Comprehensive Immigration Reform

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The second of a series looking into Biden’s first few weeks in office. It ain’t pretty. Watching the Democratic Presidential primary debates of 2019-20, it wasn’t hard to find the “uh oh” moment when you knew something would not end well. And it came early – June 2019 – during an MSNBC debate moderated by Savannah Guthrie. […]

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Later today, Paul Ryan is going to release a “National Security Strategy” that will propose new border security and immigration reform. “America must secure the border once and for all by accelerating the deployment of fencing, technology, air assets and personnel,” Ryan’s strategy reads. “We also must overhaul our immigration system for national security reasons.” […]

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When President Obama defeated Mitt Romney, it marked the fifth time in the previous six national elections in which the Republican nominee lost the popular vote to his Democrat counterpart. Having won only 27% of the Latino vote in 2012, the GOP decided that to become competitive again it needed to “reach out” to Hispanics […]

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Skipsul wrote and titled, by his own description, an inflammatory piece on Ted Cruz yesterday (see the Main Feed). I was hard (probably too hard on someone I respect and enjoy reading) on Skipsul about regurgitating talking points that were used against Cruz during his Senate campaign mainly that his personal speaking style is irritating, condescending, […]

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The Establishment favorite for Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan, is an enthusiastic supporter of mass immigration: [America] is not just a country. America is an idea. It’s an idea that people from all over the world to aspire to achieve… There is no other economic system, no other immigration system that has done more […]

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In a talk at Brigham Young University about a year ago, George Will drew a line from the National Recovery Administration to the Senate Immigration Bill and showed how both are examples of a government that thinks it knows so much that it must regulate all the minutiae of your daily life.   First, he […]

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What Mike Murphy Should Have Said

 

My reaction to Mike Murphy’s recent appearance on the Ricochet Podcast can be summarized with one word: frustration. I think it safe to say that my reaction is one shared by many – probably most – members. That said, the cause of my frustration puts me in a minority on Ricochet. Though I do not support comprehensive immigration reform at the present moment, I think it will be necessary at some point and I was deeply disappointed at how poor a case Murphy made for immigration reform as a political necessity. There are few things I find more frustrating than listening to an argument to which I am sympathetic put poorly. Now I don’t expect everyone to be persuaded by this, but here’s what I think Murphy should have said:*

First, we need to recognize that the GOP’s problem with the Hispanic vote is a serious one. Hispanics are the largest minority group in the United States and are the fastest-growing segment of the American population. There are currently around 25 million Hispanics eligible to vote in the United States, a number set to rise to 40 million by 2030. Even if Hispanic immigration (both legal and illegal) were stopped entirely today, if the Republican Party cannot get a significantly higher percent of the Hispanic vote than it has in recent elections it is headed for long-term minority party status. This is particularly true in the case of presidential politics. The GOP cannot achieve an Electoral College majority without Texas and Hispanics are on track to become the largest ethnic group in Texas in about a decade. A Republican Party that receives less than 30 percent of the Hispanic vote is in trouble. Since 1980 (the first election for which such data is available and reliable), no one has won a presidential election with less than 30% of the Hispanic vote. In 2012, Romney received only 27%.

Immigration: All at Once, or Step by Step?

 

The Senate passed an omnibus immigration bill last year, 1,000+ pages long and larded with goodies for every interest group that was riding the “comprehensive immigration reform” train. Like all such massive bills, it was a mess, and the House GOP dismissed it out of hand, insisting on smaller, more targeted steps.

Rep. Raul Labrador (R-ID) floated just such a piecemeal proposal last week. Its substance is flawed, but it’s an example of concrete thinking about what step-by-step immigration changes might look like. As a bonus, it puts the Democrats in a politically awkward position.