Tag: comic

Dana Goldberg, stand-up comedian, stops by to talk how she got into comedy, bombing in front of Gloria Steinem, the fact that European audiences don’t laugh, and her talent for bonding people with humor. She shares coming out to her parents when she was 18, how they made it an easy experience, and offers her best advice for parents who have children struggling with their sexual identities. She believes you haven’t failed your child until you turn your back on them. She and Bridget discuss Dana’s ability to raise money for worthy causes, their encounters with Rihanna and Meryl Streep in real life, and using comedy as a means to protect yourself.

Full transcript available here: WiW58-DanaGoldberg-Transcript

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Ryan Stout, stand-up comic extraordinaire, shares how he got into stand-up, parsing his college courses for material, the joys of being a stay-at-home husband, and the changing effect of wearing a suit when doing a comedy show. He and Bridget discuss how liberal people used to view artists as a minority community that needed to be protected and now they view them as oppressors, the future of advertising with deep fakes, and how to support comics you like (hint: don’t just tell them they’re going to be famous and walk away). They talk comedy as an art form with an extremely short shelf life, “post comedy,” rape jokes, suicide jokes, laughter as medicine, and how the victimhood mentality is so damaging psychologically that therapy doesn’t work. Learn the truth about “making it” in Hollywood, and why intersectionality is like trying to win in a small d*ck contest. Be sure to check out Ryan’s latest comedy album Man in the Suit.

Full transcript available here: WiW56-RyanStout-Transcript

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. ACF Critic Series #34 Alan Moore

 

This week, I’m joined again by my friend Peter Paik, Professor at University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee and at Yonsei University in Seoul, author of a book on pop-culture visions of radical political change that’s most timely: From Utopia To Apocalypse.

Peter and I talk about the comic books of Alan Moore, the main subject of his book: Watchmen, made into a movie by Zack Snyder and now about to become an HBO series; V for Vendetta, made into a movie by the Wachowskis, the Matrix creators; From Hell, made into a movie by the Hughes brothers, starring Johnny Depp; and Miracleman, a Cold-War-to-End-of-History story that has not yet been adapted.

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Here’s the link to the first page. The second page of The Easy Descent: More

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Member Post

 

I’m slowly writing and posting a comic story on my website called The Easy Descent. More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Book Review: Astérix: Le Papyrus de César

 

Astérix: Le Papyrus de CésarThe publication of Julius Cæsar’s Commentarii de Bello Gallico (Commentaries on the Gallic War) made a sensation in Rome and amplified the already exalted reputation of Cæsar. Unknown before now, the original manuscript included a chapter which candidly recounted the Roman army’s failure to conquer the Gauls of Armorique, home of the fierce warrior Astérix, his inseparable companion Obélix, and the rest of the villagers whose adventures have been chronicled in the 35 volumes preceding this one. On the advice of his editor, Bonus Promoplus, Cæsar agreed to remove the chapter chronicling his one reverse from the document which has come down the centuries to us.

Unfortunately for Promoplus, one of his scribes, Bigdata, flees with a copy of the suppressed chapter and delivers it to Doublepolémix, notorious Gallic activist and colporteur sans frontières, who makes the journey to the village of the irréductibles in Armorique.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Book Review: “Superman: Red Son”

 

“Superman: Red Son” by Mark Millar, Dave Johnson, and Kilian PlunkettOn June 30th, 1908, a small asteroid or comet struck the Earth’s atmosphere and exploded above the Tunguska river in Siberia. It is the largest impact event in recorded history, estimated to have released energy equivalent to 10 to 15 megatons of TNT. Had the impactor been so aligned as to hit the Earth three hours later, it would have exploded above the city of Saint Petersburg, completely destroying it.

In a fictional universe, an alien spaceship crashes in rural Kansas in the United States, carrying an orphan from the stars who — as he matures — discovers he has powers beyond those of inhabitants of Earth, and vows to use these gifts to promote and defend truth, justice, and the American way. Now, like Tunguska, imagine the spaceship arrived just a few hours earlier. Then, the baby Kal-El would have landed in Stalin’s Soviet Union and — presumably — imbibed its values and culture just as Superman did America’s in the standard canon. That is the premise of this delightful alternative universe take on the Superman legend, produced by DC Comics and written and illustrated up the standards one expects from the publisher. The Soviet Superman becomes an extraterrestrial embodiment of the Stakhanovite ideal, and it is only natural that when the beloved Stalin dies, he is succeeded by another Man of Steel.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Bill Waterson Returns, Kind of

 

When Bill Watterson retired his wildly popular “Calvin and Hobbes” comic, he intentionally dropped out of the public eye. He has spurned interviews, job offers and autograph seekers for two decades now, becoming the Sunday funnies version of J.D. Salinger.

Last year, the reclusive artist was honored by the Angoulême International Comics Festival in France, which awarded him their highest prize. In gratitude, Watterson celebrated this year’s festival with a wordless strip.

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