Tag: columbus day

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Fox News’ most-watched program host, Tucker Carlson, took after two US Senators for advocating the abolition of Columbus Day in favor of Juneteenth – or more accurate, June 19th, 1865, when the last slaves in Texas were informed that they were free – the end of slavery, as it were, at least confederate slavery (it […]

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It hasn’t happened yet, but look for this headline to appear in newspapers across the country.  Anyone want to hazard a guess when it will happen?  Mine is 6/19/21. However, the push to make this change will begin before the November election so as to get politicians’ opinions on the record.  Watch for a unanimous […]

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A Viking and an Italian Got on a Boat…with a Pole?

 

Columbus Erikson PulaskiPresident Trump has issued the standard annual proclamation for Columbus Day, without any bowing to the oppressive white man narrative. Nor, did he leave the “Columbus wasn’t first” script dangling, as he had already issued the lesser-known annual proclamation for Leif Erikson Day! In between those two proclamations about dead white guys, he issued a third! Friday, October 11, marked the anniversary of the death of General Pulaski! I considered some highlighted themes in the proclamations and offer brief analysis.

Presidential Proclamation on General Pulaski Memorial Day, 2019
Issued on: October 10, 2019

On General Pulaski Memorial Day, we remember Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski, the great Polish hero who fought and died in America’s noble pursuit of freedom during the Revolutionary War. We honor his bravery and unwavering commitment to liberty and self-government, and we pay tribute to the abiding friendship between the United States and Poland, which has prevailed since General Pulaski took up the sword on behalf of the American cause and helped forge our young Republic.

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OK, I’m a day late (as a new retiree I’m probably a dollar short too), but I was just reading a Wall Street Journal Best of the Web column (possibly behind a paywall) on the trend of city and state governments to ditch Columbus Day and replace it with “Indigenous People’s Day.” Although the column […]

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David French of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America start the week with a whole menu of crazy martinis.  They rip CNN and other social justice types for declaring President Trump’s Columbus Day statement insufficient because he didn’t mention the suffering that the explorers inflicted upon the indigenous people who were already adept at slaughtering each other.  They’re also staggered as California enacts one law to criminalize the use of pronouns that conflict with a person’s stated gender identity and another law that no longer makes it a felony to expose a partner to HIV without telling them.  David refers to these laws as “extremism in service to the sexual revolution.”  And they react to Vice President Pence leaving Sunday’s Colts-49’ers game after some 49’ers knelt during the national anthem and President Trump’s tweetstorm against Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker.

In this special “Holiday Formerly Known As Columbus Day” edition of the podcast, Michael Graham explains why, yes, the progressives are absolutely right to use “Indigenous People’s Day” to remember the horrors of slavery and oppression. In fact, they have no idea just how right they are.

Also, historian J. Mark Powell of “Holy Cow History” notes some significant dates from history this week, including a key moment for fans of “nattering nabobs of negativism.” And the story of “The Jewish Cowboy” who became a movie legend.