Tag: colleges

Segregation is Alive and Well, Thanks to Progressives

 

This country has tolerated the attacks of Progressives who experience great satisfaction in calling Republicans and Conservatives racist. We are now seeing the downside of their crusade, as segregation becomes a reality once more. The history of Progressive racism has been ignored for many years, but the support of the Left for various forms of racism in the past can be tied to the call for segregation today, especially on college campuses. It is a frightening and ugly picture.

We need to take a look at the history that connects Democrats and the Left to racism. The most obvious relationship became apparent after the Civil War during the period of Reconstruction. The Democrats in the South were outraged about the freed slaves who chose to support the Republican party; after all, Abraham Lincoln’s declarations of emancipation were carried out by President U.S. Grant and both were heroes of the black community. As a result, Democrats essentially waged a southern war against blacks who became politically active; they brutally attacked and murdered blacks who met to become politically active as Republicans. President Grant was torn about the appropriateness of sending federal troops to regain order in the states, but it was clear that another war was on the horizon if he didn’t. The Ku Klux Klan was formed in 1866 and was active well into the 20th century. It was one of the most vicious terrorist and white supremacist groups that this country has ever seen.

Meanwhile, we can point to a number of “scholars” who supported the progressive cause and were racists and eugenicists:

Confederate Statues Are Torn Down—Who’s Next?

 

Margaret Thatcher, at Hillsdale College

The latest brouhaha about moving a Confederate statue called Silent Sam took place at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The statue was originally pulled down in August, and now university administrators must keep it on campus; a state law was passed in 2015 prohibiting state agencies from “permanently removing or relocating state-owned memorials or statues.” UNC Chancellor Carol Folt stated, “I have a preference to move it off campus, but, like everyone here, I swore to obey the law.” How noble of her.

Member Post

 

We all need a break from politics.  Some do it with cute kitten pics, others with links.  While doing some research, I stumbled across this funny post on another web site: http://community.sparknotes.com/2018/08/06/every-harry-potter-book-summed-up-in-a-single-sentence/slide/1 Preview Open

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Heather Mac Donald and Frank Furedi discuss the hostility to free speech that has provoked disturbing incidents on campuses across the country and the ideology behind safe spaces, micro-aggressions, and trigger warnings. Their discussion, from a Manhattan Institute event held in June 2017, was moderated by City Journal contributing editor Howard Husock.

American universities are experiencing a profound cultural transformation. Student protests designed to shut downalternative opinions have become frequent and sometimes violent. Frank Furedi‘s What’s Happened To The University? A Sociological Exploration of Its Infantilisation explores the origins of the anti-free speech climate at U.S. and U.K. universities.

Member Post

 

Colleges were always meant to be places where young people learned to be good citizens. Many even started as institutions of learning for the biblically-inclined, so as to teach good citizenship that way, as well as the ability to fear God. Yale was founded in 1701, by Protestant ministers. Specifically, they were Congregationalist, which meant […]

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Member Post

 

   I make my college debut at West Chester College in eastern Pennsylvania on September 19, in what I anticipate will seem less like a gig than a reality show to see if I can say politically correct things while half-plausibly seeming to mean them. In that spirit, I have decided to re-write my stand-up for West […]

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Review: Remembering Who We Are: A Treasury of Conservative Commencement Addresses

 

rem-who-we-areAccording to US Federal Election Commission data, 96 percent of Ivy League faculty and administrators that gave money to a presidential candidate in 2012 donated to President Obama. The left-leaning nature of American academia is well-known, but rarely raised in polite company. Speaking at Harvard’s 363rd commencement last year, however, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg did just that. Citing the Election Commission’s figure, he uncomfortably tempered Harvard’s next generation of leaders with a message of tolerance over uniformity. “There was more disagreement than that among the members of the old Soviet Politburo,” he said, adding the obvious sleight that “a university cannot be great if its faculty is politically homogenous.”

In order to weather its current economic and political challenges, America needs not only a more balanced exchange of ideas, but to reconnect with tried and tested principles. Thus, the purpose of Zev Chafet’s Remembering Who We Are, a diverse collection of college commencement addresses, “is not to develop a right-wing orthodoxy, but precisely to show the intellectual and cultural nuance on that side of the spectrum.”

From neurosurgeon Ben Carson, to playwright David Mamet and others, the speeches thread messages of individual liberty, responsibility, free enterprise, and the rule of law with personal experience and advice to the next generation.