Tag: College

Member Post

 

Looking at this college admissions scandal, it is easy to blame the guy running the scheme, as well as the celebrity faces, for driving up the cost of secondary education. The problem goes much further back than that… Growing up, my parents always said “just go to college, get a degree, and you’ll always have […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are a bit surprised by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff signaling they don’t plan to pursue impeachment of President Trump unless there’s a bipartisan consensus for it. They also look on sadly as New York City’s exorbitant taxes and hard left policies leave the city careening towards bankruptcy. And they crack a few pop-culture jokes but also weigh in on the serious issues as celebrities and elites around the country are charged with bribing colleges and universities to admit their kids under false pretenses.

Member Post

 

I have mentioned before that I decided to go back for a Master’s degree after receiving my Bachelor’s 13 years prior. My program is made up of about 25 students; only five of which (including myself) are over 35 and have careers. I am a lifelong Conservative, and remember back when I was in undergrad […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer Tennessee Democratic Senate hopeful Phil Bredesen for bucking the talking points from Washington Democrats and saying the Senate should move forward on the Kavanaugh nomination if Christine Ford refuses to testify. They also roll their eyes as California Rep. Anna Eshoo claims Ford does not have a political bone in her body, which is patently false, and another California congressman mocks the threats liberals are making against Maine Sen. Susan Collins over this issue. And they have fun with the news that many college students request and fill out absentee ballots but never mail them in because they have no idea where to get a stamp.

John Tierney joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss the First-Year Experience (FYE), a widely adopted program that indoctrinates incoming college freshmen in radicalism, identity politics, and victimology.

Beginning as a response to the campus unrest of the 1960s and 1970s, the FYE originally sought to teach students to “love their university,” with a semester-long course for freshmen. Today’s FYE programs, however—largely designed by left-wing college administrators, not professors—sermonize about subjects like social justice, environmental sustainability, gender pronouns, and microaggressions.

As the Young Americans find themselves in the dog days of summer, they wonder whether the “fur-ternity leave” now offered by some companies proves that young people love dogs too much. And with summer coming to a close, they also give some advice for college students going back to school or heading there for the first time.

Member Post

 

As part of the experience of moving my son into his Freshman college dorm this week, I noticed something on the doors of all students on a different floor. The RA had a nice idea of putting little signs with names of the occupants on each door. It had their names and then had several […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. “Blurred Lines”: Scandals in Bohemia and Ecclesia

 

“And that’s why I’m gon’ take a good girl / I know you want it… / I hate these blurred lines / I know you want it… / But you’re a good girl…” Unlike in Thicke’s hit, the “it” youth seeking mentorship want is hopefully not sex. Nonetheless, decent people have long suspected that among more bohemian sorts — actors, musicians, academics, etc — the blurring of lines between mentorship and sexual grooming, coupled with the impulse to save face, risks fostering a climate of sexual abuse. I’ve even heard decent people argue that those who go into bohemian fields ought to know what they’re getting into, and if they’re abused, it’s really their fault.

Decent people don’t want bohemian clergy. Nonetheless, religious callings have more in common with the bohemian than decent people might like to think. It’s appropriate for spiritual mentorship to be intense (possibly even more intense than intellectual or artistic mentorship). It’s normal for charismatic spiritual leaders to attract groupies (also known as disciples). Great good can come from both these dynamics. But also great evil. Decent people are properly sensitive to the great harm false accusations can do, and it feels awful to suspect those called to holiness of perverting these dynamics. Nonetheless, perversion has obviously happened — especially, it seems, in Catholic seminaries.

Member Post

 

I don’t have to add anything. Just click and read, all you Second Amendment supporters out there: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/05/16/conservative-students-parting-shot-at-colleges-anti-gun-policies-goes-viral-come-and-take-it.html Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

At National Review Online, I write about Penn State University barring its Outing Club from doing what the club was created to do and has been doing for 98 years — off campus outings. The disallowed activities are less dangerous than many on-campus activities that students undertake daily. What gives? An excerpt: Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. YAF at Brandeis: Christina Hoff Sommers

 

Thanks to Young America’s Foundation (formerly Young Americans for Freedom) our conservative club was able to host Christina Hoff Sommers last Tuesday. We had advertised her around campus thus: “Politically involved? Feminist? Engage in the campus dialogue.” Ironically, other than a graduate student, I was the only female club member to show up. But I enjoyed getting the VIP treatment — sitting in the front seats and being able to hang out with Sommers before and after the event.

The assistant dean (she’s great) started off by talking about how fortunate we were to have these forums for free speech and making it very clear that no disruptive behavior would be tolerated within the room. Then we got to hear from Sommers.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Bryan Caplan is an economics professor at George Mason University and a Libertarian’s Libertarian. In fact, he’s an anarcho-capitalist, which makes him a member of one of America’s most elite hyperminorities. Caplan is consequently unafraid to tell people where he stands, being as this is where he sits. Consequently, he is in favor of radically […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

In Banter’s fifth installment of the “Bridging the Dignity Divide” series, AEI Visiting Scholar Mark Schneider joined the show to discuss alternatives to the traditional bachelor’s degree, such as associate and certificate programs, and the differing earnings outcomes of these programs. This research was featured in the new report “Degrees of Opportunity: Lessons Learned from State-Level Data on Postsecondary Earnings Outcomes.” In addition to his role at AEI, Schneider is Vice President at the American Institutes for Research. He is the author and editor of numerous articles and books on education policy and has been working to increase accountability by making data on college productivity more publicly available.

About the “Bridging the Dignity Divide” Series

Member Post

 

Three guesses to identify the U.S. college where this (unretouched) photo was taken. (The first two don’t count.) Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Woke, Triggered, and Micro-Aggressed

 

Ironically enough, I’m sitting on a college campus writing this, as I wait for my kid to get out of her last class of the week. I read earlier today how UC Berkeley will be providing counseling for students and employees in case they feel scared from anything conservative speaker Ben Shapiro might utter on their campus at his upcoming engagement.

The school is “deeply concerned” about the “impact of the speakers on their safety and belonging.” As if any of those people will actually be attending the speech by Mr. Shapiro or any other conservative. Maybe just the fact he will be breathing the same air as they do on campus is upsetting to them. I don’t know.

Amy Wax and Larry Alexander, professors of law at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of San Diego, respectively, wrote an op-ed recently which argued that not all cultures are equal. In response, many of their colleagues in higher education went berserk. Bill interviews Prof. Wax about the op-ed and the controversy that erupted. Then Bill talks with Congressman Ron DeSantis about his proposal to rein in the Mueller investigation and stop it from turning into a witch hunt out to get Pres. Trump. Finally, Bill and Brian Kennedy discuss how Pres. Trump has handled the major crises before him, particularly Hurricane Harvey and the continued aggression of North Korea.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Mattress Girl Discredited

 

If you haven’t heard of the “mattress girl,” it’s not for lack of trying among liberal opinion shapers. Emma Sulkowicz, who dragged a blue mattress around Columbia University’s campus in 2014 to dramatize her plight as a rape victim, was profiled sympathetically in New York magazine, the New York Times and other publications. Senator Kirstin Gillibrand (D., NY) invited her to attend one of President Obama’s State of the Union speeches. Artnet pronounced her mattress stunt (for which Columbia awarded her course credit as an art project) “one of the most important art works of the year,” and she was honored by the Feminist Majority Foundation and other groups.

Her story is this: A consensual sexual encounter with a male student named Paul Nungesser suddenly turned violent. Without warning, he choked her, struck her, and anally penetrated her while she cried out in pain.

Member Post

 

Daughter, Soon you will be heading off to your first year at college, a school which has already given you an assignment for summer reading: the non-fiction, epistolary cri de coeur titled Between The World And Me, by author Ta-Nehisi Coates. I gather that the idea is for you and other incoming freshman to have a common […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. College vs. the Love of Wisdom

 

Part I: A sad realization

While we Ricochetti may find it regrettable, the vast majority of human beings aren’t interested in ideas. In my Advanced International Relations class, we met once a week after reading a book. It was mentally electrifying. We ran the gamut of different ideas and theories and hammered out what they all meant. The teacher was superb, and it was a smaller class, so it was perfect for discussion. The class was among the most intellectually productive things I’ve ever done. Sadly, I doubt that a majority of the students were really into it. I asked my Professor why the students were so uninterested in the morality of torture and wars and Empires. He shrugged and said that while he always found it odd, it was usually that way.

Member Post

 

I was talking with a friend yesterday who is the mother of a freshman at UC Berkeley. My friend and her daughter attended orientation together last fall. A group of parents and freshmen met at the iconic Sather Gate as orientation commenced, and they were addressed by a current student, an orientation team leader who was responsible for […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.