Tag: college admissions

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Many years ago I attended Dartmouth College.  I vaguely recall the essay process in which I tried to guess what the admission dean was looking for, and then offer that up.  The below is a summary by the dean of admissions of some of the recently admitted class of ’26 admissions.  My question for the […]

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Kenny Xu, author of An Inconvenient Minority: The Attack on Asian American Excellence and the Fight for Meritocracy and the president of Color Us United, joins the podcast to discuss whether Harvard discriminates against Asian applicants in its admissions process (a case about which will soon be considered before the Supreme Court). They also cover related issues about race in America.

The Kids Are Alright… Sorta.

 

A newly released poll, carefully constructed and conducted, has some surprisingly good news about American college students’ views. The results are consistent with a 2019 Pew poll of the general public. The vast majority of videos and stories on college culture and students suggest very different answers than those offered by real students. The left has not won. It ain’t over ’til it’s over. No fate.

College Pulse Poll, June 2021: College Pulse offers marketing and research products linking American college students with businesses and non-profit organizations. Their June 2021 poll asked twenty-two questions on policy issues. The sample was drawn from over 400,000 enrolled students and carefully adjusted to reflect the actual demographics of the student population. See a brief, clear explanation of the survey design here.

Harvard Caught in Victim Vise

 

Haaah-vahd is caught in a virtuous-victims vise, and it couldn’t happen to a more deserving center of intersectional grievance mongers. For the past year, Harvard has been slowly bled by allegations and then ugly revelations about their administration’s racial problem with Asians. Now, Harvard is being sued for profiting today from the racist Harvard past, specifically by exploiting the image of a slave. The plaintiff claims she is a descendant of the exploited African-American and suffers harm herself in seeing the continued exploitation of her ancestor by Harvard.

So, Harvard University is being sued for discrimination against Asians, in the same way as they once discriminated against Jews, and is being separately sued for the present-day continuation of its 19th-century exploitation of an African-American slave. Perhaps the Harvard shield of arms should be updated, replacing “Veritas,” written across three open books, with a plain black bar sinister.

It couldn’t happen to a nicer bunch:

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Looking at this college admissions scandal, it is easy to blame the guy running the scheme, as well as the celebrity faces, for driving up the cost of secondary education. The problem goes much further back than that… Growing up, my parents always said “just go to college, get a degree, and you’ll always have […]

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The college admissions scandal that captured the nation’s attention has sharpened the critiques of American institutions dedicated to social mobility. When do they succeed, and how have the failed? Also, Beto mania is sweeping… the press. Does the former congressman from Texas have a constituency outside center-left political media?

Admissions Committee Meeting

 

Chairman Megrim: We’re down to the last four candidates for our final slot in the class of 2023. Professor Melena?

Professor Melena: Dennis Whitehead. Fifth in his class at Quincy High School, 1440 on his SAT, swims and plays water polo, Eagle Scout, plays guitar for the school jazz quartet and has his own band, volunteers at…

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According to this article, the Justice Department is criticizing Harvard for using race as a deciding factor in not offering admittance to south- and east-Asians (full disclosure: by father is mostly Indian & Chinese, among other races / ethnicities).  We’ve known for years that colleges & universities have been doing this, since these non-white students […]

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Recently in the news is the lawsuit against Harvard University for discriminating against Asian people.  The facts as they are presented in news accounts look bad for Harvard. Asians beat other groups on all sections of the admissions evaluations except for a subjective part graded by administrators who don’t even meet the students. Inexplicably, Asians score […]

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My son, a high school senior, is mulling his college choices. It’s really come down to two schools: Hillsdale and the University of Michigan. The former is my choice; the latter is his choice. (He can likely get admitted to either place.) He doesn’t object to Hillsdale, exactly. Politically and culturally, he’d fit right in. […]

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Why Yale Students Aren’t Ideologically Diverse

 

Screen Shot 2016-02-10 at 8.54.07 AMThe New York Post has been giving Ed Boland a lot of press recently in advance of his soon-to-be-released book, The Battle for Room 314. The promotion began with an article headlined with typical Post subtlety, “My Year of Terror and Abuse Teaching at a NYC High School.” Reporter Maureen Callahan introduces her subject:

In 2008, Ed Boland, a well-off New Yorker who had spent 20 years as an executive at a nonprofit, had a midlife epiphany: He should leave his white-glove world, the galas at the Waldorf and drinks at the Yale Club, and go work with the city’s neediest children.

As I read the foregoing, another headline sprang to mind: Teacher Bludgeoned by Reality. But let’s hear Mr. Boland’s story: