Tag: Colin Quinn

Colin Quinn (stand-up comic, actor, writer, Saturday Night Live alum) stops in to talk about his book Overstated – A Coast-to-Coast Roast of All 50 States, and he and Bridget manage to cover, the election, why Bridget should be a criminal profiler and write a book about U-Haul rentals, Colin’s plans for modern-day Constitutional Conventions, the fact that everybody’s crazy now and nobody seems to notice, and they compare psychic experiences (Colin’s involves OJ Simpson). They discuss how odd it is that our society has reached a place where people on the extreme left and right give people in the middle sh*t rather than vice versa, Colin’s elaborate plan to become best friends with Jeff Bezos, how he almost starred in Crocodile Dundee 2, why giving your opinion can be very expensive, and learning the meaning of the word “consequences.”

Colin Quinn Skewers Political Correctness

 

Colin-Quinn-UnconstitutionalIf you know comedy, you know Colin Quinn. The Brooklyn native began his career on MTV’s “Remote Control” (alongside Adam Sandler), which led to a gig on “Saturday Night Live” (alongside Adam Sandler). Then, in the early ’00s, he hosted the vastly underrated “Tough Crowd with Colin Quinn” on Comedy Central, broadcast nightly after “The Daily Show.”

“Tough Crowd” was set up as yet another cable panel show, but everyone was a comedian, most were friends, and the political viewpoints were all over the place. Guests ranged from the far left to the far right to utterly unclassifiable. One common topic was political correctness since, even then, comics found audiences growing increasingly censorious.

When “Tough Crowd” comics left or right spouted cliched talking points in a joke format (i.e., the “clapper humor” popularized by Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert), Quinn would heckle the crowd and ridicule the lazy comic. The guest would usually throw it back at the host and the segment would end with laughter. Nevertheless, the message was reinforced that comedy isn’t just another vehicle for social signaling; it’s about making people laugh and sometimes squirm.