Tag: Climate Change

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Pet adoptions or ownership in the United States grew somewhere upwards of 10% during 2020, especially during the pandemic. No surprise there. And pet ownership is huge: 85 million American households have at least one pet, some 67% of homes. Some 13% of people became first-time pet owners in 2020. Among those who adopted a […]

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Understand that to surrender even a tad of freedom, a touch of liberty, or a bit of property—whether to climate change, Covid, national security, the “common good” or “society’—based on the decree of a demented, illegitimate president, a narcissistic zealot like AOC, the descendant of a nepotistic lineage of privileged inbreds like Pelosi or Newsom, […]

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Deep (Freeze) in the Heart of Texas

 

The recent dramatic events in Texas are an early warning sign of the disasters that are likely to occur if the Biden administration continues its relentless effort to demonize the use of fossil fuels in the effort to combat climate change.

Assessing whether the climate is really changing requires looking at two numbers. The first is mean global temperatures across time. While that figure is increasing overall, it shows a complex up-down pattern that cannot be explained solely by the steady increase in carbon dioxide emissions. The higher the mean temperatures, the worse the supposed problem.

The second measure, though often neglected, is every bit as important: the variance in temperatures, whether measured in days, seasons, or years. A lower variance over a relevant time period means less stress on the power grid and other systems, even when the mean temperature increases. The general trend is that the variance in the temperature has gone down over time. Even today, for example, a large fraction of the record high temperatures in the United States took place in the 1930s—when carbon dioxide levels were far lower than they are today—with only three record highs after 2000.

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Mark Twain is credited with saying “history doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes”. In our modern political environment (especially on the left but not absent from the right), political ideas don’t rhyme but are often regurgitated.  One example is our “debate” over climate changed and the “solutions” to it. We all know the usual talking […]

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Here’s What’s Wrong with ‘Trust the Science’

 

Think about the times you’ve been told to “trust the science.” Two occasions should come to mind immediately: when discussing climate change and when talking about the Wuhan coronavirus.

There’s a lot of science being done on the subject of climate change. There’s a lot of science being done on the subject of the coronavirus. Let’s assume, for the sake of discussion, that the vast bulk of this is “good” science — that it’s being conducted by competent people acting in accordance with the techniques and standards of science. That’s almost certainly a safe assumption.

An Overambitious Climate Plan for Biden

 

President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team has made it clear that climate change will be a top policy priority for his incoming administration. In crafting its policies, the Biden administration may heavily rely upon a blueprint already created by former Obama administration officials and environmental experts. Known as the Climate 21 Project, the exhaustive transition memo seeks “to hit the ground running and effectively prioritize [Biden’s] climate response from Day One,” after which it hopes to implement major institutional changes within the first hundred days of the Biden presidency. The project’s recommendations involve eleven executive branch agencies, including the Departments of Energy, Interior, and Transportation, as well as the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, all of which are now actively involved in environmental policy. But the breadth of the Project 21 initiative is evident by its inclusion of State, Treasury, and Justice, too.

The project makes a grim assessment of the (unnamed) Trump administration. In speaking of the Environmental Protection Agency, it notes, without identifying any particulars, that it “has experienced a prolonged, systematic assault to disable effective capacities, demoralize its highly expert and dedicated staff, undercut its own legal authorities, and betray the EPA’s core mission to protect human health and the environment.” To reverse these trends, the Climate 21 Project is determined to shift the EPA’s focus “to climate change and clean energy,” an effort centered “around a deep decarbonization strategy.” The memo adds that the Interior Department must directly seize on “climate mitigation opportunities . . . in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil resources owned by the public and tribes, boosting renewable energy production on public lands and waters, [and] enhancing carbon sequestration on public lands.”

The project’s seventeen-person steering committee consists of many Obama administration officials and environmental activists. Its co-chairs are Christy Goldfuss, formerly a managing director at the White House Council of Environmental Quality and now the head of Energy and Environmental Policy at the Center for American Progress, and Tim Profeta, Director of Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. The committee contains no mainstream Republicans or market-oriented economists. Its orientation is captured by the repeated use of the words “crisis” or crises,” which appear fifteen times in its report’s summary alone, usually joined with the word “climate.”

Jack brings on Citizens’ Climate Lobby Conservative Fellow Nate Hochman to hear out Nate’s case for a conservative climate change agenda.

On today’s episode of Power Hungry, FREOPP Visiting Fellow Robert Bryce talks to California Assemblyman Jim Cooper, a Democrat, about a letter he wrote accusing the Sierra Club of fueling environmental racism. What’s going wrong with energy policy in California?

A Question for My Fellow Ricochetti

 

I’ve got a question I’m trying to answer, and it occurs to me that someone here might be able to help me. One of the things I like most about Ricochet is the thoughtfulness and intelligence of the members. Another thing that impresses me is the diversity of this crowd. So I’m going to toss this out there and see if anyone has any thoughts to offer.

I wrote a post not too long ago about the need for a civil dialog across the political divide. A fellow in New York City, one of these young, hyper-educated computer entrepreneur types, read it and invited me to participate in a new podcast he’s launching soon. He wants his first episode to feature someone from the left and someone from the right holding a civil discussion on matters about which they disagree.

On today’s episode of Power Hungry, FREOPP Visiting Fellow Robert Bryce talks to Michael Shellenberger, founder of Environmental Progress, about his new book Apocalypse Never. Is nuclear power our best hope for reducing carbon emissions? They discuss that and more!

http://robertbryce.com/

Michael Shellenberger joins Brian Anderson to discuss America’s nuclear industry, China’s deal with Saudi Arabia to produce uranium “yellowcake” from uranium ore, and Shellenberger’s new book, Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All.

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Denmark has discovered at least how to circumvent it (like the kids laws to ensure their futures): Make opposing climate change or failing goals so illegal that no government can exist unless it is committed to previously-set standards and goals. Try to avoid them and yer out! (No need to consult voters of course). https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200706-the-law-that-could-make-climate-change-illegal […]

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Bestselling author, journalist, and environmental activist Michael Shellenberger joined host Ben Domenech to discuss climate alarmism and how the left wing media and activists have distorted the urgency of climate change. Shellenberger just published his most recent book, “Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All,” this month.

Shellenberger condemned the left’s journalists, climate activists, and malthusian scientists for promoting climate alarmism. The radical left has taken an immoral position by denying vast, inexpensive energy sources to all people, he said, which they consider to be the moral center of apocalyptic environmentalism.

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https://dirt.asla.org/2020/05/26/suburban-sprawl-increases-the-risk-of-future-pandemics/ It’s odd how all the “new urbanism” defenders haven’t said following the virus: well yeah, the suburbs aren’t that bad after all. Nope, it’s like how climate people say whether it’s cold or it’s hot, they are always right about overall global warming. I read this article today in which the author said the […]

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Democrats and their ilk have already likened the threat of pandemics to the fanciful threat of “climate change”, presumably considering measures as bold as the current lockdowns to enforce counteraction. So let’s review why the term itself proves their climate concerns utterly ridiculous.  For years, “global warming” was their battle cry. Why? The argument was […]

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The Multi-Front Attack on Free Speech

 

Free speech…free expression generally…is under attack in America and throughout the Western world to a degree not seen in a long time. I think there are specific phenomena and (partially-overlapping) categories of people which are largely driving this attack, to wit:

The Thugs. As I pointed out in my post The United States of Weimar?, illegal actions against political opponents, ranging from theft of newspapers to direct assault and battery, have in recent decades become increasingly common on university campuses, and now are well on track to being normalized as aspects of American politics. Incidents of political thuggery are reported almost daily: just the other day, pro-Trump women at an upscale DC hotel were verbally attacked and apparently physically assaulted by members of a wedding party that was heavy on Democrat attendees; including, reportedly, some top officials from the DNC. A pro-free-speech film was reportedly interrupted by two men wearing masks. Interruption of movies they didn’t like was a tactic used by the Nazis prior to their obtaining official censorship powers. The film “All Quiet on the Western Front” was plagued by Nazi disruptions when released in Germany in 1930. And attempts to shut down dissident speakers on college campuses, such as this, have become so common as to now be almost the default expectation.