Tag: Climate Change

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“Meanwhile, the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act that Biden signed into law in November includes $7.5 billion to jump start the president’s goal of having 500,000 EV charging stations nationwide by 2030. ” – Epoch Times “How many gas stations are in the United States? The figure most experts estimate is about 111,000. The […]

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Rep. Jared Huffman, Democrat of California, joins “Plugged In”  hosts Josh Siegel and Neil Chatterjee to discuss a big week ahead in the House as it prepares to vote on the party’s climate and social spending bill.

He urges the Senate to keep intact the House’s version of the Build Back Better Act because, “we are late in the game and need to hurry up and get this over the finish line.”

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks to Prof. Roger Pielke, Jr., Professor of Climate Science at the University of Colorado, about the widening gap between the catastrophic predictions proffered at the COP26 Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, Scotland, and the less dire observations contained in the UN’s own recent IPCC report.

Guest:

Daniel Yergin, vice chairman of IHS Markit and Pulitzer Prize winning author of The New Map: Energy, Climate and the Clash of Nations, joins “Plugged In” hosts Josh Siegel and Neil Chatterjee to discuss the energy crisis occurring in Europe and Asia and how that should inform discussions at the U.N. climate summit in Glasgow.

 

Ayaan speaks with Michael Shellenberger about the drug addiction crisis taking over major U.S. cities. They also discuss the results of the Virginia elections, the potential of a political realignment and the COP26 conference.

Michael Shellenberger is the founder and president of Environmental Progress and is the author of Apocalypse Never and San Fransicko.

Former Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo of Florida, an original GOP climate champion, joins “Plugged In” hosts Josh Siegel and Neil Chatterjee to discuss his party’s “evolution” on climate change and why he thinks it can do more.

Curbelo also predicts a “big” policy solution on climate change will emerge in Florida, where residents are already “living” the effects of a warming planet.

GOP Rep. John Curtis of Utah, chairman of the Conservative Climate Caucus, joins “Plugged In” hosts Josh Siegel and Neil Chatterjee.

Curtis shares details on why he is joining a delegation of House Republicans visiting a major U.N. climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland.

West Virginia Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, the top Republican on the EPW Committee, joins “Plugged In” hosts Josh Siegel and Neil Chatterjee to talk about all things CEPP, coal, COP26, and climate change.

Capito predicts that Democrats can find a way to get her West Virginia colleague, Sen. Joe Manchin, to say “yes” on the CEPP program by being more lenient to natural gas. She also warns Democrats’ clean electricity performance program would accelerate the energy transition too fast, and eliminate coal in the state.

Why Do the Maldives Still Exist?

 

Climate science has long been consumed by the politics of climate, at least as far as any work in climate change or global warming is concerned.  All control of the project at the UN’s IPCC was put into the hands of activists and administrators in the 1980s,  The lead scientist at the UN in charge of the question of carbon dioxide at the time, Tom Wigley,  maintained that there was not yet sufficient evidence to show that man-made carbon dioxide was changing the climate, and it was unlikely to show up in the foreseeable future.  Activists in third-world countries led by Brazil got tired of waiting for this evidence and so moved to proclaim the guilt of man-made carbon dioxide by fiat.  The situation is detailed by Bernie Lewin in a chapter of the book “Climate Change: The Facts”.  Those scientists who enthusiastically prostitute themselves to the climate narrative have been richly rewarded, and any scientist who failed to toe the warmist line was ejected and de-funded.  In addition, a large number of low-level functionaries from third world countries were elevated to the status of “leading climate expert” and could therefore be counted on to give their unwavering support to the project.

The ability to predict future changes in the climate is, of course, the rai·son d’ê·tre of climate science, and it is remarkable how bad climate science is at doing that.  There is a very long list of wrong predictions with the prediction of global atmospheric temperatures leading the pack.  Environment Canada publishes its predictions about the climate every year.  By law they must include their previous predictions and their performance in each report, and each report therefore includes a long list of failures, in some cases with disastrous results.  But it doesn’t seem to matter.  They go along making predictions using the same flawed methods year after year confident that nobody in authority will hold them accountable.  The facts don’t matter.  Only the thermageddonist vision as laid down by the IPCC matters.

One climate science prediction that struck me as remarkable with regard to the stubbornness of the facts was about the Maldives.  The Maldives is a nation consisting of a group of islands in the Indian Ocean remarkable for the fact that none of them has an elevation of over 8 feet above sea level, and half of the 115 square miles of dry land that makes up the island nation is no more than 1 foot above sea level.  Yet the Maldives has existed as a place of human habitation for 2500 years.

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Hugh Hewitt, 65, hosts the second-longest-running radio talk show in the United States. With hundreds of affiliates in nearly every state, Hugh is also a former attorney, law professor, former Reagan Administration official, and perhaps the best interviewer in all media. I especially love how Hugh interviews journalists from the mainstream media and expertly schools […]

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The Other Shoe

 

Was COVID a black swan event?  Some say yes, but why?  A pandemic caused the entire world to shutter (and shudder), and new rules, regulations, and restrictions were imposed at a rapid rate.  This has never happened before.  Diseases have come and gone, but none have changed the world to this extent.  What’s next?

I heard a podcast by a regular Ricochet podcast contributor, finance guru Carol Roth, on Glenn Beck this week; give it a listen.  Everything circles back to The World Economic Forum.  It seems too coincidental how so many things are falling into place: social, political, financial, environmental, economical (stakeholder capitalism anyone?) nutritional (I know – but check out the WEF’s plans for food) educational, medical (medical passports – and finally, one governmental ID to buy, sell, enter events, travel, etc.), even spiritual changes (censorship) that line up with the plans of the WEF’s Great Reset.

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Pet adoptions or ownership in the United States grew somewhere upwards of 10% during 2020, especially during the pandemic. No surprise there. And pet ownership is huge: 85 million American households have at least one pet, some 67% of homes. Some 13% of people became first-time pet owners in 2020. Among those who adopted a […]

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Understand that to surrender even a tad of freedom, a touch of liberty, or a bit of property—whether to climate change, Covid, national security, the “common good” or “society’—based on the decree of a demented, illegitimate president, a narcissistic zealot like AOC, the descendant of a nepotistic lineage of privileged inbreds like Pelosi or Newsom, […]

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Deep (Freeze) in the Heart of Texas

 

The recent dramatic events in Texas are an early warning sign of the disasters that are likely to occur if the Biden administration continues its relentless effort to demonize the use of fossil fuels in the effort to combat climate change.

Assessing whether the climate is really changing requires looking at two numbers. The first is mean global temperatures across time. While that figure is increasing overall, it shows a complex up-down pattern that cannot be explained solely by the steady increase in carbon dioxide emissions. The higher the mean temperatures, the worse the supposed problem.

The second measure, though often neglected, is every bit as important: the variance in temperatures, whether measured in days, seasons, or years. A lower variance over a relevant time period means less stress on the power grid and other systems, even when the mean temperature increases. The general trend is that the variance in the temperature has gone down over time. Even today, for example, a large fraction of the record high temperatures in the United States took place in the 1930s—when carbon dioxide levels were far lower than they are today—with only three record highs after 2000.

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Mark Twain is credited with saying “history doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes”. In our modern political environment (especially on the left but not absent from the right), political ideas don’t rhyme but are often regurgitated.  One example is our “debate” over climate changed and the “solutions” to it. We all know the usual talking […]

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Here’s What’s Wrong with ‘Trust the Science’

 

Think about the times you’ve been told to “trust the science.” Two occasions should come to mind immediately: when discussing climate change and when talking about the Wuhan coronavirus.

There’s a lot of science being done on the subject of climate change. There’s a lot of science being done on the subject of the coronavirus. Let’s assume, for the sake of discussion, that the vast bulk of this is “good” science — that it’s being conducted by competent people acting in accordance with the techniques and standards of science. That’s almost certainly a safe assumption.

An Overambitious Climate Plan for Biden

 

President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team has made it clear that climate change will be a top policy priority for his incoming administration. In crafting its policies, the Biden administration may heavily rely upon a blueprint already created by former Obama administration officials and environmental experts. Known as the Climate 21 Project, the exhaustive transition memo seeks “to hit the ground running and effectively prioritize [Biden’s] climate response from Day One,” after which it hopes to implement major institutional changes within the first hundred days of the Biden presidency. The project’s recommendations involve eleven executive branch agencies, including the Departments of Energy, Interior, and Transportation, as well as the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, all of which are now actively involved in environmental policy. But the breadth of the Project 21 initiative is evident by its inclusion of State, Treasury, and Justice, too.

The project makes a grim assessment of the (unnamed) Trump administration. In speaking of the Environmental Protection Agency, it notes, without identifying any particulars, that it “has experienced a prolonged, systematic assault to disable effective capacities, demoralize its highly expert and dedicated staff, undercut its own legal authorities, and betray the EPA’s core mission to protect human health and the environment.” To reverse these trends, the Climate 21 Project is determined to shift the EPA’s focus “to climate change and clean energy,” an effort centered “around a deep decarbonization strategy.” The memo adds that the Interior Department must directly seize on “climate mitigation opportunities . . . in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil resources owned by the public and tribes, boosting renewable energy production on public lands and waters, [and] enhancing carbon sequestration on public lands.”

The project’s seventeen-person steering committee consists of many Obama administration officials and environmental activists. Its co-chairs are Christy Goldfuss, formerly a managing director at the White House Council of Environmental Quality and now the head of Energy and Environmental Policy at the Center for American Progress, and Tim Profeta, Director of Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. The committee contains no mainstream Republicans or market-oriented economists. Its orientation is captured by the repeated use of the words “crisis” or crises,” which appear fifteen times in its report’s summary alone, usually joined with the word “climate.”