Tag: Classic Literature

Why We Need Shakespeare Now More than Ever

 

Yes, the War Against Shakespeare has been going on for years now. But the Woke Supremacists in universities are stepping up the volume, because, you know, Shakespeare is not relevant today. It’s not just because he represents white-supremacy, racism, anti-Semitism, sexism, and all other -isms. No. He’s not relevant.

What can Shakespeare possibly have to say to today’s youth, or today’s young adults, or even today’s old adults? How can Shakespeare possibly be relevant to them? Let’s take a moment to imagine…

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A Tale of Two Cities is one of my favorite books. If you’ve never read it, I highly suggest adding it to your list, and pronto. Some of you may know that my wife is a writer and author of eight books. While serving as my editor pro bono she’s also a writing coach, ministry […]

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Wisdom and the Book of Job

 

What follows are some thoughts from a recently completed re-reading of the Book of Job.

To set the stage: Job tells the story of a righteous man who endures incredible suffering, all under the sovereign oversight of Almighty God. The narrative follows a series of long poetic dialogs between Job and the friends who have come to mourn with him and comfort him, all concerning the nature of man and his relationship to God. Job’s friends argue that Job must have sinned greatly to have merited such punishment from God. Job counters that he has lived a just life, and that the miseries visited upon him are unjust. Ultimately, Job is vindicated and restored by God, but in the telling, it is made clear to Job that he is not owed an answer or justification by God. Rather Job comes to recognize that the Lord’s power and authority are beyond human accountability.

The Proletariat Is Getting Counter-Revolutionary

 

This piece in the Atlantic is a very good read. Reed College, in Portland, OR, has endured 13 months of outrage over Humanities 110, the college’s signature humanities course. In the course, students are trained to engage in critical reading of various ancient works from the perspective of different disciplines. A group of snowflakes formed themselves into “Reedies against Racism” in response to a call to protest police violence against blacks. Of the list of demands, one was reforming Hum 110.

But for RAR, Hum 110 is all about oppression. “We believe that the first lesson that freshmen should learn about Hum 110 is that it perpetuates white supremacy—by centering ‘whiteness’ as the only required class at Reed,” according to a RAR statement delivered to all new freshmen. The texts that make up the Hum 110 syllabus—from the ancient Mediterranean, Mesopotamia, Persia, and Egypt regions—are “Eurocentric,” “Caucasoid,” and thus “oppressive,” RAR leaders have stated. Hum 110 “feels like a cruel test for students of color,” one leader remarked on public radio. “It traumatized my peers.”

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Classic fiction crackles with descriptions of fire and heat. Consuming flame offers not only dramatic potential, but also powerful symbolic value. Passions smolder, infernos destroy, and embers warm. Even novels from the outwardly prim and virtuous Victorian Age seethed with fiery symbolism. Consider these closing passages from an essay on Jane Eyre and fire:  When left unchecked and uncontrolled, the very […]

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