Tag: civil war

Such Was the Fidelity of a Dog: Mousel, the Mascot of the 8th Illinois Infantry

 
Civil War Period Illustration of a Soldier with his dog. (Peterson’s Magazine, October 1863)

Civil War soldiers faced the dangers of the battlefield with great valor, but they also had to come to terms with the boredom and loneliness that was part and parcel of army life. To help cope with the stresses of military service, many soldiers adopted pets or mascots that traveled with their owners on the march and in battle. One of the most famous Civil War mascots was “Old Abe,” the eagle mascot of the 8th Wisconsin Infantry, but all manner of creatures served as mascots. Probably the most common mascot was the dog, and they came in a wonderful variety of breeds and sizes. The importance of these canine companions to the soldiers they followed should not be underestimated; the following story, published in the Vicksburg Daily Herald, on July 21, 1864, illustrates this fact.

A DOG ON THE BATTLEFIELD – A TRUE STORY

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Quote of the Day: Abraham Lincoln and his Religiosity

 

Lincoln grew into an intensely religious man, although we rarely hear him described in those terms nowadays. His religious faith became fundamental to his thinking and decision-making during the Civil War; we rarely hear that either. When he assumed the enormous burden of the presidency with war approaching, his faith grew deeper. When his beloved young son Willie died in early 1862, it deepened again—and seemed to continue growing deeper until his death. In the end Lincoln should almost certainly be remembered as the most important religious figure America has ever produced. I don’t mean he was a theologian. But Amos, Isaiah, and Jeremiah weren’t theologians either.

– David Gelernter, The Fourth Great Western Religion

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Angel of the Battlefield: An Unexpected Gift

 

As a child, I was addicted to a series of biographies written for children. They were undersized volumes, with a textured blue cover and the name of the featured person written in a kind of script. One of those books told the story of Clara Barton. Her courage, determination, and devotion to the soldiers of the Civil War have stayed with me all these years.

Clara Barton, 1905

When many people think of Clara Barton, they may think of the American Red Cross, which she founded. But the actions that motivated her to pursue that establishment were amazing and admirable. I’d like to share some of that story, especially the unexpected gift she became to the American soldiers of the Civil War and their families.

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But How Will You Pay For It?

 

This post stems out of a conversation at the work lunch table. Someone brought up that Brooklyn Bug-Eye’s economic illiteracy. “We’ve chased Amazon away! That’s three billion in tax incentives that we can spend elsewhere!” Not quite how that works. The discussion moved on to banning cow farts and air travel and so forth. I’ll spare you the details, you’ve heard ’em all before. The problem is that by the time you get to how you’re going to pay for such a thing you’ve already lost the argument.

Here, let’s have Rachael Carson tell it.

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Member Post

 

In the spring of 2008, when the term was still new, I posted a survey regarding the notion of the Cold Civil War on a now-closed group blog, WindsofChange.Net. Its few questions were an attempted reality check on the sundering of personal, business, and political relationships that would presumably accompany any move towards “politics by […]

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Codevilla and Our Revolutionary Spiral

 

Angelo Codevilla isn’t as prolific as, say, Victor Davis Hanson, but when he drops one it’s time to pay attention. The latest is no exception: Our Revolution’s Logic.

His main thesis is that a spiral has begun, away from the American system of resolving political differences, and into a tit-for-tat of using power, fair and foul, not just to be left alone, but to force the other party to conform. Trump, the Resistance, and Kavanaugh all play starring roles. Read the whole thing.

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The overcast sky rested heavily on the landscape on the day we visited Valley Forge. Few people were there on that day, as if they were avoiding a reminder of the chilly autumn season that lay ahead and the brutal memories long past. An admirer of General George Washington during the Revolutionary War, I wanted […]

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Will of the Wisp

 

will-o’-the-wisp: noun

  1. (Also called: friar’s lantern, ignis fatuus, jack-o’-lantern) A pale flame or phosphorescence sometimes seen over marshy ground at night. It is believed to be due to the spontaneous combustion of methane or other hydrocarbons originating from decomposing organic matter
  2. A person or thing that is elusive or allures and misleads

There are probably few ship types surrounded by as much romance as the Civil War blockade runner. It was risky, but not illegal. It was not smuggling. Rather, it was an attempt to circumvent a wartime blockade – a blockade that was legal only in so far as it could stop neutrals from entering or exiting a port declared blockaded.

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Issued by General Gordon Granger “19th of June”, 1865 Galveston, TX, General Order #3 “The people are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property, between former masters and slaves, and the connection […]

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Quote of the Day: Savoring the Enemy’s Losses

 

“Grant had captured an army of at least 13,000 men, a record of the North American continent. He showed mercy toward the conquered force, giving them food and letting them keep their side arms. Avoiding any show of celebration, he refused to shame soldiers and vetoed any ceremony in which they marched. ‘Why should we go through with vain forms and mortify and injure the spirit of brave men, who, after all, are our own countrymen,’ he asked.” — from Grant, by Ron Chernow

“If your enemy falls, do not exult; if he trips, let your heart not rejoice, lest the Lord see it and be displeased, and avert his wrath from him.” —Proverbs, 24: 17-18

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I have not been around as much as I would have liked lately. That is partly due to the fact that I have a new job that is keeping me very busy. As part of that job I have been doing a podcast. In this episode of the podcast I speak with Lisa Bradley who […]

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A New Book to Be Read and Treasured

 

Twenty-five years ago, I published a massive tome, 1,200 pages in length, titled Republics Ancient and Modern: Classical Republicanism and the American Revolution. It sold out within 13 months. It was picked up by the History Book Club, then reprinted in 1994 in three paperback volumes; and it is still in print and was recently released on Kindle.

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It seems to be my lot to point out flaws in Professor Epstein’s reasoning. In the 100th podcast of Law Talk, he repeated his contention that the Roman law of partnership should be viewed as the model for the relationship of the States to the Federal government. Under Roman law, and English and U.S. common […]

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Was Slavery the Cause of the Civil War?

 

The great American tragedy is raising its ugly head once more, as it does occasionally. People on both sides are viciously accused by people on opposite sides, sometimes justly, sometimes not, as America divides along fault lines remarkably similar to the one that ruptured in 1861. My contention is that the horrible war could only be justified by the victorious side by making it a moral war. Was it?

In GFHandle’s piece, “Should We Honor Lee?,” several of us discussed that question, i.e., whether slavery was the cause. I contend that, in fact, the American Civil War was a cultural war, a refight of the English Civil War of the 1630s. Members of each side fled England to escape the other during the seventeenth century, one side to Massachusetts to seed northern culture, the other to Virginia to seed southern culture — and maintained both their cultures and their animosities to such an extent that they would fight again in the 1860s.

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In the wake of violent protests in Charlottesville, Richard Epstein looks at the limits on government power to restrict inflammatory speech, considers Donald Trump’s rhetorical response to the protests, and weighs in on whether confederate monuments should start coming down. More

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A Confederacy of Dunces

 

I absolutely despise “alternative history” fiction. The distortion of real history is bad enough.

Enter David Benioff, D.B. Weiss, and executives at HBO. Time-Warner’s pay channel has commissioned the creators of “Game of Thrones” to create “Confederate,” an alt-history series where the American Civil War ended in a stalemate and the Confederacy is now a 21st Century nation with institutionalized slavery. This is, as liberals would say, “problematic.”

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Daniel Greenfield on Communism, America’s New Civil War, Democrats, Israel, and Iran

 

Daniel Greenfield, a frequent contributor to FrontPageMag.com and Shillman Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center runs the best-named blog on the internet: SultanKnish where his articles and investigative pieces have been cited by Rush Limbaugh, John Podhoretz, and Michelle Malkin, to name a few. In today’s Whiskey Politics Podcast we discuss the Left’s nostalgia for Communism, America’s new civil war, culture, education, the GOP budget, Democrats treatment of Israel, the Iran Deal, North Korea and much more.

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Member Post

 

I had originally signed up for the April 12th quote of the day. I decided to take a social media and most of net break during Holy Week, so I missed the 12th. So here is the quote that I was going to share. More

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Member Post

 

Mr. Lincoln’s T-Mails was on sale for Kindle recently, and I’m sorry I didn’t announce it when it was $1.99. Although the writing is a bit repetitious (the author keeps spiraling back to ideas already stated), this is so far an engaging read with many satisfying “huh!” moments. They are savory enough that I re-read […]

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