Tag: civil rights

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Devery Anderson, the author of Emmett Till: The Murder That Shocked the World and Propelled the Civil Rights Movement. Today, August 28th, marks the 65th anniversary of the brutal murder of 14-year old Emmett Till, a story which is central to understanding America’s ongoing struggle for civil rights and racial justice. Devery recounts the events at Bryant’s Grocery & Meat Market in Money, Mississippi, which led to the horrific tragedy, and places it in the wider historical context of the Jim Crow South. They discuss Mamie Till-Mobley’s bold decision to make Emmett’s funeral public, with an open casket, and how the event impacted the Civil Rights Movement and its important figures, from Rosa Parks to the late Congressman John Lewis. They also delve into Till’s murderers, their acquittal and later confession, and their fate. The interview concludes with a reading from The Death of Innocence, the heart-wrenching memoir authored by Emmett Till’s courageous mother.

Stories of the Week: Writing in the USA Today, co-host Gerard Robinson explores new poll results on attitudes toward police officers among Black residents in fragile communities. Offering inspiration to millions of young women in STEM fields, a female MIT professor originally from Maine solved a mathematics problem that had stumped experts for half a century. Education insiders are speculating over who would replace USED Secretary Betsy DeVos should she depart after the presidential election.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Dr. Sephira Shuttlesworth, a retired teacher and charter school leader, and the widow of the late Birmingham, Alabama, civil rights leader, the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth. Dr. Shuttlesworth shares her and her siblings’ experience attending a poor-quality segregated school in Tennessee, and how it motivated them to integrate an all-white elementary school in the 1960s. She also discusses her late husband’s central role in the Civil Rights Movement, bringing the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to Birmingham, as well as voter registration, and reforms to law enforcement and the legal system. She explores what inspired her to become a teacher and charter school leader, and why educational opportunity is so critical to fulfilling the vision of equality that civil rights leaders like the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth articulated.

Stories of the Week: What will the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in the Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue case mean for our neediest families? The Wall Street Journal reports that some affluent parents, concerned about school reopening plans this fall, are turning to alternatives, such as online classes, outdoor programs, or joining other households to create micro-schools. But would these same parents support school choice programs for other, less fortunate families?

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Virtual Learning Violates the Civil Rights of Special Education Students

 

Late last night, the Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) Board of Directors voted 7-2 in favor of a three-phase reopening plan that will begin the 2020-2021 school year with 100 percent virtual learning. I woke up to this news and, while I am no longer an MPS family (more on that in a bit), I am a resident and taxpaying citizen, and I have thoughts.

A Choice Based on Fear, Not Logic

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Dr. Charles Glenn, Professor Emeritus of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at Boston University. Dr. Glenn shares his early experiences as an inner city minister involved in the Civil Rights movement in Massachusetts and the South, the METCO voluntary desegregation program, and the expansion of school choice in several districts beyond Boston. He also discusses his support in the 1990s for bringing the charter school concept to Massachusetts. His work was cited in Justice Alito’s concurring opinion in the Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue case, and he shares thoughts on the recent decision’s potential impact on racial justice and religious liberty. He discusses findings from his decades of research on international education systems, where there is no controversy about government support for faith-based schools, and the lessons for America, where a legacy of anti-Catholicism has impeded school choice. Dr. Glenn concludes with analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of schools of education in preparing effective teachers.

Stories of the Week: Some states such as Florida are grappling with a surge in COVID cases, leaving plans for an August reopening in flux. How should school leaders address questions about virtual learning, outdoor classrooms, and mask and quarantine protocols? Gerard and Cara talked about Dr. Thomas Sowell, the noted Hoover Institution economist, and his recent book, Charter Schools and Their Enemies, on the success and challenges faced by New York City’s charter schools.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard mark the Juneteenth commemoration
of the end of slavery with an episode devoted to Civil Rights history. They are joined by Diane McWhorter, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Carry Me Home: Birmingham, Alabama: The Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution. They explore the parallels between the current civil unrest and racial injustice the country is witnessing and what took place in 1963 in Birmingham, Alabama, including police brutality then and now, and the ongoing connection between race, economics, and political pressure. They discuss the Civil Rights Movement’s success with shifting public opinion, through nonviolent protests and indelible iconography, and whether strong statements and product name changes issued by so many corporations today are likely to lead to genuine structural change. They also delve into the role played by women in the Civil Rights Movement. Diane concludes with a reading from the epilogue of her book, Carry Me Home.

Stories of the Week: In England, the government will be funding tutoring programs to bridge learning gaps as a result of COVID school closures, targeted to disadvantaged communities. Is this a model worth exploring here? New York’s wealthy families have fled Manhattan due to COVID – will they return to those elite schools if remote learning continues in the fall, or shift to the suburbs?

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. One Week from Now: Law and Order Polling at All-time High

 

In a remarkable turnaround from just a week ago when concepts such as law and order were deemed less popular than the coronavirus, pollsters across the country are now reporting that lawfulness has reached a record high approval rating, particularly among minorities.

As sociologists struggled to explain what could be motivating an unprecedented number of Americans of all backgrounds to support peaceful protesters over violent mobs, firemen over arsonists and the police over looters, public officials at every level of government scrambled to signal to their constituents their support for the rule of law.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Sheriffs Have Discretion, Too, and It’s Going Viral

 

If you elect a sheriff, they get to play the independent mandate “I’m a check against tyranny” card like every other elected government officeholder. And some are (from the Greenwich Times):

In Snohomish County, Washington, Sheriff Adam Fortney is refusing to enforce the governor’s stay-at-home order. He claims the order “intrudes on our right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” On April 22, he told constituents via a Facebook post that “along with other elected Sheriffs around our state, the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office will not be enforcing an order preventing religious freedoms or constitutional rights.”

Member Post

 

In most jurisdictions, police officers involved in the fatal shooting of civilian get a “cooling off” period before they have to tell investigators what happened. This time for cooling-off gives the police officers an opportunity to collect their thoughts and present their positions after their emotions have had an opportunity to cool down. Why shouldn’t […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Autumn Colors: The Color of Law, an in-depth review

 

When people are free to associate as they please, we can’t be surprised if they sometimes self-segregate. People self-sort along many affinities, including ethnic affinities. This is what lawyers call de facto segregation, and it’s none of the law’s business. De jure segregation — segregation imposed by law, including segregation promoted by public policy — is, on the other hand, very much the law’s business.

In 1866, Congress passed a Civil Rights Act (the 1866 CRA) asserting the equal rights of blacks before the law, including property rights, and real-estate rights in particular. The 1866 CRA warned

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Sign of our Times: A Culture of Fear

 

Robby Soave: “On Monday, the boys were forced to meet with an assistant principal and an anti-bullying specialist, who quickly decided to punish them for clearly constitutionally-protected speech.”

Truly a sign of our times. Two boys go to a shooting range, train with legal firearms. Post some pictures and innocuous comments about their training and are immediately punished by their school because of the complaints of one panicked parent.

Member Post

 

Wisdom from America’s #2 spoiled brat, David Hogg: “In Florida, the number of African-Americans who can’t vote because of a previous conviction is 21%. In Kentucky, it is 26%. In Alabama, it is 15-16%. These are people of color who have been historically discriminated against and still are to this day.” Read More View Post

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Richard Epstein explores the Supreme Court’s ruling in the case of a Colorado baker who refused to make a cake for a gay marriage ceremony, critiques the judicial style of Anthony Kennedy, and explains how anti-discrimination laws have expanded beyond a useful scope.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

While the Left has been pre-occupied with giving rights to just about everyone else, Donald Trump decided to make a move that will finally protect our health care workers’ religious rights. : More than 300 individuals filed a complaint with the Health and Human Services (HHS) Department over the last month, saying that their religious or conscience rights […]

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Richard Epstein discusses the history behind America’s anti-discrimination laws and explains why they’re not well-suited for the modern economy

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. ACF#28 Roman J. Israel, Esq.

 

The Oscars are coming up and some of the movies in contention are both remarkable and obscure. My friend Carl Eric Scott and I offer you a conversation about the Dan Gilroy-Denzel Washington movie Roman J. Israel, Esq., a story about civil rights and the struggle for justice, dignity, and the human person in our times. Denzel was nominated for his remarkable role, which is itself the result of a remarkable process. Gilory, the writer-director, has said he wrote the script for Denzel and he trusted the actor to bring the character to life and fit him into the story, with great freedom to improvise and complete trust that the result would be memorable. This is the sort of movie the Oscars should reward and that audiences looking for stories made for adults should support.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review on Ricochet on the following Sunday. Read More View Post

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Max Eden joins Seth Barron to discuss student discipline and suspension policies, and how discipline “reform” has led to chaos in many classrooms.

In January 2014, in an attempt to reduce out-of-school suspensions, an Obama administration directive forced thousands of American schools to change their discipline policies. Proponents of the new discipline rules say that teachers and school administrators have been racially discriminatory in meting out punishments, creating a massive disparity in suspension rates between white and black students. Their claims, however, ignore the significant discrepancies in student behavior.

Member Post

 

Remember Jack Phillips, the Christian baker who has been ordered by the Colorado Civil Rights Commission to bake wedding cakes for same-sex couples — even though to do so would violate his personal religious convictions? He appealed the order and his appeal is soon to be heard by the Supreme Court. So naturally, and just […]

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Victor Davis Hanson looks at the hobby horse issues of various identity politics groups—Black Lives Matter, LGBT advocates, modern feminists, and Hispanic activists—and explains how each of them are overlooking more dire threats facing their communities.

Victor Davis Hanson critiques the recent wave of national anthem protests in the NFL, explains why the league’s activism can’t be squared with the way it actually does business, and considers the importance of politics-free zones in American life.