Tag: citizenship

Member Post

 

After decades of voting faithfully and without fail, I am not voting this November. As with most such decisions, there are several reasons, some specific to my circumstances and some more general. The main reasons can be grouped into two categories: Game theory: One person’s vote almost never matters. Voting doesn’t pay, in the rigorous […]

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How Much Is Your Vote Worth?

 

shutterstock_162124301In a recent, brilliant column Thomas Sowell argued something I’ve felt for awhile: that we should encourage people who feel they’re getting a bum rap in our society to leave.

[Leftist academics] teach minorities born with an incredibly valuable windfall gain — American citizenship — that they are victims who have a grievance against people today who have done nothing to them, because of what other people did in other times. If those individuals who feel aggrieved could sell their American citizenship to eager buyers from around the world and leave, everybody would probably be better off. Those who leave would get not only a substantial sum of money — probably $100,000 or more — they would also get a valuable dose of reality elsewhere.

Dr. Sowell’s market-based approach has the advantage of replacing American malcontents with resourceful immigrants, but I’d go a step further and allow people to permanently expatriate themselves in exchange for a “severance package” of $100,000 and a plane ticket to their destination of choice. Who could ask for anything more? It certainly beats 40 acres and a mule, which implies a lot of hard work.

I’m Happier When I Don’t Read the News. Now What?

 

7866309682_4165b0bcd9_zI’ve been trying it as an experiment: not reading the news, at all. I didn’t really think it would make that much difference. The experiment is now going on Day 10, and the results are so dramatic that — were this a formal protocol — I’d be morally obliged to halt the experiment, take the control group off the placebo, and give them the no-news treatment.

The change is not — I repeat, not — a minor effect; and every bit of intuition (for what that’s worth) tells me that neither is it merely the result of expecting to feel better and therefore feeling better. I’m sleeping better. I’m waking up more refreshed. I’m enjoying every moment of my life more. I have more energy. I’m more patient with everyone around me. The effect is comparable to, say, getting regular physical exercise (as opposed to sitting on my rump all day), or to my change in mood when spring finally arrives after a long, cold and gloomy winter. I’m not so somatically self-involved that I take regular measurements of these things, but I’d be curious to know if I’ve experienced a change in blood pressure, resting heart rate, cortisol levels, and so forth. From the way I feel, I’d be unsurprised to learn that I have.

It makes sense, I suppose: the news is unremittingly bleak. I’m a fairly sensitive person. Of course I feel better when I don’t know what’s happening beyond my lovely and peaceful neighborhood. I’m sure it’s better for my mental and physical health to be cheerfully oblivious. But there’s only one problem: it’s wrong.

Member Post

 

According to Global News, there are so many Americans trying to renounce their US citizenship at the Toronto Consulate that there’s a waiting list stretching to January 2015. How convenient for the US government that it can prevent Americans from renouncing their citizenship simply by throwing red tape and bureaucracy at them. Preview Open

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