Tag: citizenship

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Don’t Know Much About History: Veterans Day Edition

 

This is page one of the “Intermediate Level U.S. History since 1900” workbook, used to prepare for the citizenship exam. What, if anything, do you think current 8th-12th graders and college students would put down in each block, before peeking or asking Siri or Alexa? If you let either of those spirits into your home, what do they say about these wars?

Citizenship Study Guide page

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Roberts Robs Citizens of Crucial Information

 

There has been plenty of commentary, on Ricochet and elsewhere (see first and especially Amy Howe’s analysis), about the decision penned by Chief Justice John Roberts, joined by the four consistent leftists in relevant parts on Department of Commerce v. New York. One issue, and important consequence, seems unaddressed. By sending the matter back to the Federal District courts, without imposing a very accelerated calendar and requiring a decision back to the Supreme Court by the end of the summer, Roberts has effectively pushed back any actual count of the illegal alien population by a decade! He has kept the political process uninformed, except by competing guesses, presented as statistical models and sample data. This is the point on which President Trump should be hammering daily.

Roberts did not rule that a citizenship question is unconstitutional, but he did not need to, as his opinion, as written, runs out the clock nicely. Instead, he relied on insinuations that Wilbur Ross had racist motives and had lied to cover up these racist motives. By entertaining this smear job by the lower courts, Roberts diverted the conversation from the ultimate bipartisan elite goal, perpetuating their numbers racket.

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You get the political genie arising from the very bottle of ink with which the Constitution was scribed. You get three wishes consistent with the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, and you get them forever if you want, what would they be? What are the two or three things that […]

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This week on Banter, Michael Strain and Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach joined the show to discuss the importance of the 2020 census and the challenges to its implementation, including a lack of funding and a controversial proposal to include a question on US citizenship. Dr. Strain is the John G. Searle Scholar and director of economic […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Hyperbole at Its Finest

 

This showed up on my Facebook newsfeed this afternoon. I have probably lost a friend over my reply:

Stunning perhaps, but not accurate. In 1937, the German Jews who were detained were sent to work camps and death camps. That is the first difference. Neither of those happen to those detained by ICE. The German government turned on its own citizens. Their German citizenship counted for nothing. Every single country in the world has citizenship requirements, including Canada and Mexico—the two countries that border us.

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This AEI Events Podcast features the address by Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks delivered during AEI’s 2017 Annual Dinner at which he was awarded AEI’s Irving Kristol Award. To hear introductory remarks from Arthur Brooks, Robert P. George, or Bill Kristol, visit the event video here. More

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Though it is commonly believed today that civilizational changes are moved primarily by introduction of ideological insights, I believe history is moved mainly by introduction of technologies. Thus, where others cite “the” Scientific Method and “Enlightenment” philosophies as ideas which birthed the modern age, I have argued that communications, transportation, and production technologies were more […]

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You want federalism? This is federalism! Left-wing Dutch vegan who moved to Switzerland is denied a Swiss passport because she is too annoying More

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Opening, Closing, or Losing an American Mind?

 

The-Righteous-Mind-Cover1I joined Ricochet as part of a personal, spiritual project—-though a liberal, I had come to see political polarization as an obstacle to what I believe to be not only my calling but the highest human calling: love one another.

Jonathan Haidt’s book, The Righteous Mind, had convinced me that liberals have to talk to conservatives and conservatives have to converse with liberals, or the country as a whole will become stupider and uglier. This makes civil dialogue between liberals and conservatives (and everyone in between) into a serious patriotic duty. Indeed, since I am unlikely to be asked to defend my country by force of arms, engaging in such dialogue may be the sole contribution I can make to the great American experiment.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Terrorism is the New Treason

 

349px-Pasaporte-euaJoining a terrorist organization is illegal on several levels, as is waging war against the United States or murdering and maiming its citizens in the name of jihad (or any other cause). If you don’t believe me, here’s a list of 77 people — mostly US citizens — who’ve been charged in connection with joining the Islamic State. If that’s not convincing, I’d recommend a field trip to ADX Florence, where you can ask to speak with any of the dozen or so convicted jihadis living there, including American citizens Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Faisal Shahzad, and Ahmed Omar Abu Ali. It probably won’t work, but it may be instructive and I gather the area’s pretty.

Whether we are enforcing these laws adequately, doing our best to catch and deter terrorists before they commit criminal acts, or whether any of these laws require reform are all worthy topics, but we seem to have no shortage of means of prosecuting suspected terrorists (nor should we). That’s why it’s so indefensible for Sen. Ted Cruz to champion a bill that, on top of all this, makes it far easier for the federal government to strip terror suspects of their citizenship. As Cruz put it in one of the debates last month:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Libertarian Podcast with Richard Epstein: “Citizenship and the Presidency”

 

Richard Epstein examines the legal issues underpinning Donald Trump’s argument that Ted Cruz may be constitutionally ineligible to be president.

Listen in above or by subscribing to The Libertarian through iTunes.

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The conversation you will find below started in Mr. Aaron Miller’s fun discussion of games & therefore I felt it should be taken out, because it’s ugly stuff. The book is, I believe, a must-read for people interested in American war & modern warfare. I expect more than a few people here on Ricochet have read […]

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This should shake things up a little… More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

[Coulter]’s from Connecticut, & she’s very upset about immigrants. I’m willing to lend a sympathetic ear to people from Connecticut when it comes to immigrants — if they happen to own a tribal casino! My feeling is, unless you’re Native American, you should just shut up about this. ‘Cause you ain’t from here. That’s the […]

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Donald Trump has made public his policy proposals for immigration reform. I checked the websites of the other candidates, and his is the most detailed proposal on immigration so far. There are some items, such as e-verify, which I think most candidates would be in favor of. For the purpose of this post, I focused on those items that […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Calling John Walker, Or, Can Anyone Be a Citizen Anymore?

 

When he joined us for the Ricochet podcast last week, John Walker got me thinking. (To judge from the comments, he got a lot of us thinking.) One of John’s points: That as knowledge expands, each of us can know only a smaller and smaller portion of the whole. Computers, for example, used to be simple enough to enable John and a couple of his buddies to design them from scratch, then sell them. Today that would be impossible. Computers now rely on too many layers of software. John could still design a computer from scratch, of course, but it would seem so primitive, so much like a crude toy, that it would have no commercial value.

This brought to mind Jeffrey Hart, the professor who had a profound influence on me when I was an undergraduate at Dartmouth—and the professor who in turn had influenced him. Consider this passage from Professor Hart’s magnificent volume, Smiling Through the Cultural Catastrophe:

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After decades of voting faithfully and without fail, I am not voting this November. As with most such decisions, there are several reasons, some specific to my circumstances and some more general. The main reasons can be grouped into two categories: Game theory: One person’s vote almost never matters. Voting doesn’t pay, in the rigorous […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. How Much Is Your Vote Worth?

 

shutterstock_162124301In a recent, brilliant column Thomas Sowell argued something I’ve felt for awhile: that we should encourage people who feel they’re getting a bum rap in our society to leave.

[Leftist academics] teach minorities born with an incredibly valuable windfall gain — American citizenship — that they are victims who have a grievance against people today who have done nothing to them, because of what other people did in other times. If those individuals who feel aggrieved could sell their American citizenship to eager buyers from around the world and leave, everybody would probably be better off. Those who leave would get not only a substantial sum of money — probably $100,000 or more — they would also get a valuable dose of reality elsewhere.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. I’m Happier When I Don’t Read the News. Now What?

 

7866309682_4165b0bcd9_zI’ve been trying it as an experiment: not reading the news, at all. I didn’t really think it would make that much difference. The experiment is now going on Day 10, and the results are so dramatic that — were this a formal protocol — I’d be morally obliged to halt the experiment, take the control group off the placebo, and give them the no-news treatment.

The change is not — I repeat, not — a minor effect; and every bit of intuition (for what that’s worth) tells me that neither is it merely the result of expecting to feel better and therefore feeling better. I’m sleeping better. I’m waking up more refreshed. I’m enjoying every moment of my life more. I have more energy. I’m more patient with everyone around me. The effect is comparable to, say, getting regular physical exercise (as opposed to sitting on my rump all day), or to my change in mood when spring finally arrives after a long, cold and gloomy winter. I’m not so somatically self-involved that I take regular measurements of these things, but I’d be curious to know if I’ve experienced a change in blood pressure, resting heart rate, cortisol levels, and so forth. From the way I feel, I’d be unsurprised to learn that I have.

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