Tag: Cities

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Steven Malanga and Rafael Mangual join Seth Barron to discuss concerns that lawlessness is returning to American cities, a theme that Malanga and Mangual explore in separate feature stories in the Summer 2019 Issue of City Journal. Memories of the urban chaos and disorder of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s have faded, and many local leaders today have forgotten the lessons […]

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Urbanist Alain Bertaud joins Michael Hendrix to discuss how urban planners and economists can improve city management. Bertaud’s book Order without Design: How Markets Shape Cities argues that markets provide the indispensable mechanism for cities’ growth. The book is a summation of what Bertaud has learned in a lifetime spent as an urban planner, including a stint at the […]

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review here on the following Sunday. More

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Are Conservatives Fresh Out of Ideas for Cities?

 

In the conservative state of Texas, the largest city that regularly elects a conservative mayor is Fort Worth. Across the nation, it is uncommon for midsize and large cities to elect right-of-center mayors. The notable exception would be New York City, which has elected Rudolph Giuliani and Michael Bloomberg in recent memory.

Why do conservatives struggle to win elections in big cities? Do conservatives have any policy solutions that appeal to urban dwellers? Do city residents reluctantly turn to conservative candidates to address hard issues like rampant crime or budget crises, or after preferred candidates face personal corruption scandals?

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Oriana Schwindt joins City Journal contributing editor Aaron Renn to discuss Schwindt’s seven-month-long journey to municipalities near the geographic center of every U.S. state, and what she found there: the curious “sameness” of American cities. Schwindt chronicled her travels in a recent article for New York. In gentrifying neighborhoods across the country, visitors are practically guaranteed to find high-end bars with […]

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Mick Cornett joins Aaron Renn to discuss Cornett’s time as mayor of Oklahoma City (2004-2018) and his new book The Next American City: The Big Promise of Our Midsize Metros. America is full of midsize cities that have prospered through smart governance, including Charleston, Des Moines, Indianapolis, Sacramento—and Oklahoma City. Over the last decade-plus, elected officials and community leaders have made real progress on […]

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review here on the following Sunday. More

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This week on Banter, Ed Glaeser explained how entrepreneurship helps America’s cities to thrive as well as options to make housing in these prosperous cities more affordable. Glaeser, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University where […]

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Portland’s Trouble with Homelessness

 

Michael Totten joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss the issue of homelessness in his hometown of Portland, Oregon.

Portland is often called the “City of Bridges” for the many structures that cross the city’s two rivers. Underneath many of those bridges are homeless encampments complete with tents, plastic tarps, shopping carts — and people.

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This is What the Trump Trap Looks Like

 

The long-awaited Ricochet Harvard Lunch Club mug is here!

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for February 1, 2017, it’s the This is What the Trump Trap Looks Like  edition of the podcast. We are brought to you this week by Patriot Mobile. Do you want a portion of every dollar you pay for mobile phone service to go to left wing causes? That may be happening, but there is an answer: Patriot Mobile. And we are also brought to you by SimpliSafe. Protect your home the smart way without the expensive long-term contracts using Simply Safe home security. Visit Simply Safe-dot-com-slash-RICOCHET. That’s spelled S-I-M-P-L-I-S-A-F-E dot com slash Ricochet.

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Ryan Keeps Earmarks Dead, Dem Sanctuary City Posturing, What’s Fake News?

 

Greg Corombos of Radio America and Ian Tuttle of National Review applaud House Speaker Paul Ryan for quashing an attempt by some Republicans to bring back earmarks. They also slam the defiant Democratic mayors who insist illegal immigrants will be fully protected from deportation in their cities. And they discuss the social media crackdown on fake news and what passes for journalism on the left these days.

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From Startups to Jobs, America’s Lopsided Economic Recovery

 

twenty20_0c8ba4f6-db4c-4006-b0f8-ec1a4aa7dc73_startups_office_work-e1464018155556A new report from the Economic Innovation Group, “The New Map of Economic Growth and Recovery,” examines America’s startup scarcity in the 2010s. As the report explains, “New businesses play a disproportionate role in commercializing innovations, stoking competition, and driving productivity growth. They also create the bulk of the nation’s net new jobs and provide the extra demand that is critical to achieving wage-boosting full employment.”

And the numbers are distressing. Looking at other recent recoveries, the EIG report notes the 1990s saw a net increase of nearly 421,000 business establishments, and 405,000 in the 2000s. By contrast, over the first five years of the 2010s recovery, the number of business establishments increased by only 166,500.

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Texas the Best State to Start a Career, California the Worst

 

Best Cities CareerWalletHub recently did a study showing graduating college students the 10 best and 10 worst places to start a career. To create the lists, the financial site reviewed the number of entry-level jobs, median starting salary, and housing affordability, then tossed it to their roomful of abacus jockeys to add up the results.

First for the best cities: Unsurprisingly, four of the top 10 are located in Texas, and nine are west of the Mississippi. Salt Lake City took the top spot.

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More on Housing, Inequality, and Economic Growth

 

twenty20_ed1a3b03-c953-4f77-ae69-d5b73c72acc8-e1460750194459As I wrote in my latest The Week column, inequality worriers should take a hard look at what’s happening in US cities. Turns out poorer Americans who live in some of the country’s most unequal places, such as New York and San Francisco, have some of the best longevity outcomes.

Researchers speculate that “low-income individuals who live in high-income areas may also be influenced by living in the vicinity of other individuals who behave in healthier ways.” Behaviors were found to correlate more closely with longevity than access to health insurance. As I also noted, “Economists on the left and right have begun to deeply examine how zoning regulations and other regulatory barriers artificially inflate home prices in some high-income cities.” Including such as New York and San Francisco.

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If this was how Republicans argued in televised interviews, they wouldn’t always be stuck defending themselves against Democrats’ lies. Instead of investing in fleeting individual campaigns, the Republican party should invest in promotion of videos and arguments such as this. More

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Losing the Cities

 

shutterstock_363188468I live in Chicago. It’s a very progressive town. Most of my friends and acquaintances are progressive. I work with a graying pony-tailed and bearded fellow who assertively wears his Bernie Sanders t-shirt at least once a week. I myself read The New Yorker, go to theater as much as possible, and even had a play recently produced by a local theater group. I am a devoted fan of WFMT which is simply the greatest classical music radio station in the world and a bastion of tasteful urban liberalism. When finances permit I go to orchestra concerts and even the opera.

I don’t own a car — I get around by bike or take public transportation. I get depressed whenever I have to journey to vast exurban wasteland that surrounds my city. In other words, though I live 700 miles to the west of Gotham, I live in accord with New York values, at least as far as lifestyle and culture is concerned.

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A Tale of Two Cities…Washington and New York

 

If Chicago’s the Third City, New York is the first to be sure. So where does that leave Washington, D.C.? Without it, what would we be? But we’re not so concerned with prestige on this particular program as we are with what events, characters, considerations and compromises gave birth to these two superpowers of influence and, being based in Chicago as we are, naturally our own city is the measuring stick for comparing them both.

In hour one we are joined by Tom Lewis, professor emeritus, English at Skidmore College. He’s written extensively on the mid-Atlantic states and, for an aside, an absolutely superb history of our business of radio. In Washington: A History of Our National City, we learn of just what Washington the man had to overcome to give us a seat of government.

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