Tag: Cities

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Forsaking the City

 

I’m trapped, for the time being, in a city. It’s a vivacious and proud city — arguably the state’s cultural capital; a place seemingly immune to economic malaise; a place teeming with little shops and well-manicured 19th-century neighborhoods. It appears on all the usual “best” lists — as the nth best place to raise a family, the nth most educated city in America, the nth greatest place for young professionals. It has much to offer … if you fancy yoga and craft beer and vegan cuisine.

If you’d care to join the Rudolf Steiner Anthroposophy Study Group, or the Astrology Circle, or the Lesbian Coffee House, or the Shamanic Journey Group. If you’d like to hear the local priest sermonize about social justice, then indulge in a little Catholic yoga afterward. If you’re interested in discussing “Cat Person” at the local library, or you enjoy the idea of perusing the city art museum’s collection of #Resistance artwork (which, when I last visited, included droopy hand-knit rifles with the name “Trump” stitched into them).

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John Tierney joins City Journal assistant editor Charles McElwee to discuss Pittsburgh’s recent resurgence. “If you want to see how to revive a city—and how not to,” John Tierney writes, “go to Pittsburgh.” Pittsburgh has transformed itself from the Steel City to western Pennsylvania’s hub of “eds” and “meds.” But before that could happen, the city nearly destroyed itself under various […]

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Edward L. Glaeser discusses how the proliferation of unfair laws and regulations is walling off opportunity in America’s greatest cities at the Manhattan Institute’s 2019 James Q. Wilson Lecture. We like to think of American cities as incubators of opportunity, and this has often been true—but today’s successful city-dwellers are making it harder for others to follow […]

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Steven Malanga and Rafael Mangual join Seth Barron to discuss concerns that lawlessness is returning to American cities, a theme that Malanga and Mangual explore in separate feature stories in the Summer 2019 Issue of City Journal. Memories of the urban chaos and disorder of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s have faded, and many local leaders today have forgotten the lessons […]

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Urbanist Alain Bertaud joins Michael Hendrix to discuss how urban planners and economists can improve city management. Bertaud’s book Order without Design: How Markets Shape Cities argues that markets provide the indispensable mechanism for cities’ growth. The book is a summation of what Bertaud has learned in a lifetime spent as an urban planner, including a stint at the […]

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review here on the following Sunday. More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Are Conservatives Fresh Out of Ideas for Cities?

 

In the conservative state of Texas, the largest city that regularly elects a conservative mayor is Fort Worth. Across the nation, it is uncommon for midsize and large cities to elect right-of-center mayors. The notable exception would be New York City, which has elected Rudolph Giuliani and Michael Bloomberg in recent memory.

Why do conservatives struggle to win elections in big cities? Do conservatives have any policy solutions that appeal to urban dwellers? Do city residents reluctantly turn to conservative candidates to address hard issues like rampant crime or budget crises, or after preferred candidates face personal corruption scandals?

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Oriana Schwindt joins City Journal contributing editor Aaron Renn to discuss Schwindt’s seven-month-long journey to municipalities near the geographic center of every U.S. state, and what she found there: the curious “sameness” of American cities. Schwindt chronicled her travels in a recent article for New York. In gentrifying neighborhoods across the country, visitors are practically guaranteed to find high-end bars with […]

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Mick Cornett joins Aaron Renn to discuss Cornett’s time as mayor of Oklahoma City (2004-2018) and his new book The Next American City: The Big Promise of Our Midsize Metros. America is full of midsize cities that have prospered through smart governance, including Charleston, Des Moines, Indianapolis, Sacramento—and Oklahoma City. Over the last decade-plus, elected officials and community leaders have made real progress on […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review here on the following Sunday. More

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This week on Banter, Ed Glaeser explained how entrepreneurship helps America’s cities to thrive as well as options to make housing in these prosperous cities more affordable. Glaeser, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University where […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Portland’s Trouble with Homelessness

 

Michael Totten joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss the issue of homelessness in his hometown of Portland, Oregon.

Portland is often called the “City of Bridges” for the many structures that cross the city’s two rivers. Underneath many of those bridges are homeless encampments complete with tents, plastic tarps, shopping carts — and people.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. This is What the Trump Trap Looks Like

 

The long-awaited Ricochet Harvard Lunch Club mug is here!

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for February 1, 2017, it’s the This is What the Trump Trap Looks Like  edition of the podcast. We are brought to you this week by Patriot Mobile. Do you want a portion of every dollar you pay for mobile phone service to go to left wing causes? That may be happening, but there is an answer: Patriot Mobile. And we are also brought to you by SimpliSafe. Protect your home the smart way without the expensive long-term contracts using Simply Safe home security. Visit Simply Safe-dot-com-slash-RICOCHET. That’s spelled S-I-M-P-L-I-S-A-F-E dot com slash Ricochet.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Ryan Keeps Earmarks Dead, Dem Sanctuary City Posturing, What’s Fake News?

 

Greg Corombos of Radio America and Ian Tuttle of National Review applaud House Speaker Paul Ryan for quashing an attempt by some Republicans to bring back earmarks. They also slam the defiant Democratic mayors who insist illegal immigrants will be fully protected from deportation in their cities. And they discuss the social media crackdown on fake news and what passes for journalism on the left these days.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. City Hall Republicans

 

City Journal editor Brian Anderson and senior editor Steve Malanga discuss the GOP’s new generation of pragmatic, problem-solving mayors that have helped turn around some of America’s struggling cities.

City Journal is a magazine of urban affairs, published by the Manhattan Institute.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. City Journal’s 10 Blocks: How Open Data Revolutionizes Urban Life

 

In this episode of the 10 Blocks podcast, City Journal editor Brian Anderson interviews Nicole Gelinas, author of the recent City Journal article “The Fourth Urban Revolution,” about the role of big data in effective urban planning.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. City Journal’s 10 Blocks: Revolutionizing City Streets

 

In this episode of the 10 Blocks podcast, City Journal contributing editor Nicole Gelinas interviews Janette Sadik-Khan, former New York City Transportation Commissioner, about her new book, Streetfight: Handbook for an Urban Revolution.

 

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. From Startups to Jobs, America’s Lopsided Economic Recovery

 

twenty20_0c8ba4f6-db4c-4006-b0f8-ec1a4aa7dc73_startups_office_work-e1464018155556A new report from the Economic Innovation Group, “The New Map of Economic Growth and Recovery,” examines America’s startup scarcity in the 2010s. As the report explains, “New businesses play a disproportionate role in commercializing innovations, stoking competition, and driving productivity growth. They also create the bulk of the nation’s net new jobs and provide the extra demand that is critical to achieving wage-boosting full employment.”

And the numbers are distressing. Looking at other recent recoveries, the EIG report notes the 1990s saw a net increase of nearly 421,000 business establishments, and 405,000 in the 2000s. By contrast, over the first five years of the 2010s recovery, the number of business establishments increased by only 166,500.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Texas the Best State to Start a Career, California the Worst

 

Best Cities CareerWalletHub recently did a study showing graduating college students the 10 best and 10 worst places to start a career. To create the lists, the financial site reviewed the number of entry-level jobs, median starting salary, and housing affordability, then tossed it to their roomful of abacus jockeys to add up the results.

First for the best cities: Unsurprisingly, four of the top 10 are located in Texas, and nine are west of the Mississippi. Salt Lake City took the top spot.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. More on Housing, Inequality, and Economic Growth

 

twenty20_ed1a3b03-c953-4f77-ae69-d5b73c72acc8-e1460750194459As I wrote in my latest The Week column, inequality worriers should take a hard look at what’s happening in US cities. Turns out poorer Americans who live in some of the country’s most unequal places, such as New York and San Francisco, have some of the best longevity outcomes.

Researchers speculate that “low-income individuals who live in high-income areas may also be influenced by living in the vicinity of other individuals who behave in healthier ways.” Behaviors were found to correlate more closely with longevity than access to health insurance. As I also noted, “Economists on the left and right have begun to deeply examine how zoning regulations and other regulatory barriers artificially inflate home prices in some high-income cities.” Including such as New York and San Francisco.

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