Tag: China

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Time to Reset the Doomsday Clock of ‘Late Capitalism’

 

The famous Doomsday Clock — it’s a key visual motif in the Watchmen graphic novel and television miniseries — was created by Manhattan Project scientists as a metaphor to suggest how close mankind might be to global catastrophe, originally atomic war. And over the subsequent seven decades, it seems like we’ve typically been pretty close to disaster. The clock was set at seven minutes to midnight in 1947, and it’s averaged between five and six for more than 20 years. Midnight always looms.

Similarly, so does the end of capitalism. It’s always quite late, apparently. The sun is always setting. German economist Werner Sombart coined the phrase in the early 20th century, and European socialists popularized it during the Great Depression when it probably seemed about 30 seconds to midnight for capitalism. But things were darkest before the dawn. Capitalism survived, flourished, and spread across the globe. And even small doses generated near wondrous improvement.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Medicine: Made in the USA

 
Joanie at her latest open-heart surgery

“The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.” –Sun Tzu

I am blessed to have four of the brightest, cutest, most fun-loving nieces God had the mercy to bestow upon me. But one – I’ll call her Joanie – holds a particularly special spot in my life. Joanie was born with a genetic defect that affects her heart. My brother and his wife knew before her birth she had a very serious heart defect. She had a faulty valve and a hole in her heart’s wall that required surgery immediately following birth.

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Join us for three Iran-related martinis for you today. First, Jim and Greg are glad to see the likes of Russia and China offering nothing but word salad as no nation commits arms or manpower to Iran in the wake of the Soleimani strike. They also cringe as the Pentagon has to walk back a […]

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It’s finally Friday! Yes, we are fully aware of the impeachment votes in the House Judiciary Committee but Jim sums up his analysis in roughly two seconds as we begin today’s podcast. After that Jim and Greg celebrate the big win for the Conservative Party in the UK and are thrilled to report the political […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Real Leadership, Real Statesmanship: President Trump at NATO

 

Trump and StoltenbergWhile lots of us engage in the guilty pleasure of watching selective clips of our favorite Congressional actors in the latest kabuki theater, we might profit more from considering some of the sights and sounds coming from the NATO 70th anniversary meeting of heads of state. I especially invite your attention to two official videos, one of President Trump meeting before the press with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg, and the other of the “2 Percenters” lunch meeting. Relevant excerpts from the transcripts appear below.*

Watch two mature adults have a real discussion before a real press corps. Notice that President Trump is defending NATO as a useful vehicle for the mutual defense of nations’ interests. Consider that Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg is the former Prime Minister of Norway, not a career eurocrat. Listen to both men deal carefully with both the nature of threats and the natural disagreements even among friendly nations, where each nation operates from its own interests. President Trump says: “I love that you say that NATO is changing as the world is changing.” See Stoltenberg emphasis that NATO members have (under pressure from President Trump) made over 100 billion dollars worth of increases in military defense spending. Watch both men address the challenges of both China and Islamist terrorism.

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Despite having been involved in dozens of kinetic conflicts over the past three-quarters of a century, the United States has not actually declared war on another nation since 1942, and it seems entirely possible we shall never do so again. Some combination of residual horror over the World Wars of the twentieth century; the realization […]

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Melissa Chen (NY Editor, Spectator US) stops by for a brilliant chat that covers a lot of ground. She describes growing up in Singapore in a “benevolent authoritarian state,” feeling liberated in the US, the fact that most Americans take the first amendment for granted, being on the forefront of human genome research, the Pandora’s […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Nixing Huawei

 

The Trump administration has announced that it will move to prevent federal tax money already earmarked for rural 5G high-speed wireless services from being spent on equipment from the Chinese company Huawei.

I advocate free trade, and see trade restrictions as a tool that should be used sparingly, deliberately, and as briefly as practical.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. It’s a Strange Time for the West to Panic About China’s Supposed Supereconomy

 

Chinese Finance Minister Liu Kun speaks to Governor of People’s Bank of China Yi Gang and National Development and Reform Commission Vice Chairman Ning Jizhe at a conference on China’s economic development ahead of the 70th anniversary.
China’s high rate of (reported) economic growth tempts its depiction as a supereconomy that’s figured out a successful alternative to Western-style capitalism. Its ascent to 21st century global economic and technological leadership may by unstoppable, according to this view. A New Cold War is America’s best option to slow that advance, although it probably won’t work. Delay, maybe. Defeat? Good luck.

Yet to quote economist Herbert Stein, “If something cannot go on forever, it will stop.” And maybe that pithy saying offers some insight into China’s future. For instance: A new Bloomberg Businessweek story tells how “mounting discontent among tech workers could hamper the industry’s growth, creating yet another headache for the government.” With the Chinese tech sector slumping, more and more workers are less willing to tolerate “996” shift schedule of 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., six days a week, plus overtime.

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Jim Geraghty is back and firing on all cylinders for three big stories today! First, he and Greg poster dunk on LeBron James for calling Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey “uneducated” for his tweet urging people to stand up for freedom in Hong Kong and suggesting such speech can be very harmful – to […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Let’s Troll the Chinese

 

On opening day for the NBA season, a surprisingly large number of people show up with t-shirts with Asian writing on them. Chinese, Korean, Japanese. Maybe even other Asian languages like Thai or Burmese, even though they appear nothing like Chinese; to the average security guard, all Asian languages look the same. When translated, the slogans are innocuous: “Wang Family reunion 2018,” “East Bay High School Dolphins,” “Golden State® Rocks,” “All your base are belong to us.” Some may be complete gibberish, like the random Chinese symbols tattooed on the bicep of your average bodybuilder. Everyone will be let in. After all, who’s going to hassle a cute girl with a t-shirt bearing a Hello Kitty® logo and “Why can’t we be friends” in Japanese?

And nothing happens for the first half of the game. Maybe the cameras will focus on the cute girl with the Hello Kitty® t-shirt during lulls in the game. Everything’s cool.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. ‘1636: The China Venture’ Delivers Another Great Adventure

 

Eric Flint’s standalone time-transposition novel “1632” proved so popular it metastasized into a series of some 30 novels and 12 collections of short stories.

The premise is a small town in West Virginia gets transposed in time and space with a similar volume from 17th century Thuringia in Germany. At the height of the Thirty Years War.

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Chad Benson, host of “The Chad Benson Show,” and Greg Corombos of Radio America serve up your Columbus Day martinis while Jim is away basking in a New York Jets victory. They start by getting a kick out of Bernie Sanders once again trying to drag Democrats to the left by telling ABC News the […]

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Happy Friday! We’re finally back to our usual format today, so join Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America to wrap up the week in style. First, they nod along as Vice President Mike Pence asks the media why they suddenly don’t care about foreign meddling in the 2016 campaign now […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. ESPN and ‘The Map’

 

The other morning, ESPN was reporting on the Chinese/NBA flap and used a map that shows nine dotted lines that encompass Taiwan and other territorial claims of the Communist Chinese that no other nation recognizes.

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It’s one thing to keep politics out of games, which I am still a proponent of doing. It’s another to unfairly and harshly punish voices that speak out against corruption, against abuses of human rights, and freedom…. But enough is enough. I stand with Hong Kong, and I oppose Blizzard’s obvious and laughably transparent fear […]

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Hey, we finally we have a good martini and it only took us until Thursday! Today, Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America appreciate a bipartisan group of lawmakers blasting the NBA for kowtowing to China. They also slam the Biden campaign for whining that the New York Times is making […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Is Free Speech Compatible with Free Trade in China?

 

American populists already blame free trade for costing their country jobs and industrial might. Now they blame it for curtailing freedom of speech. The argument: If the US and Chinese economies weren’t so intertwined, then China couldn’t “export” its authoritarian values by using its huge market power to strong–arm American companies.

Populists correctly note that the NBA’s rebuke of a Houston Rockets official’s pro-Hong Kong democracy tweet is hardly the first instance of Beijing trying to use its financial influence on foreign companies to shape global opinion — especially regarding Hong Kong, Taiwan, and its Uighur reeducation camps. As one China expert told The Washington Post, the Chinese communists don’t tolerate dissent on these issues inside China, “and increasingly they are not tolerating dissent on these issues outside China.”

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Bring signs to games? Make comments on NBA teams social media pages? Freedom or wokeness?  More

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